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Best orange liqueur for chocolates


Smiley Riley
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I like Cointreau, but wouldn't refuse Grand Marnier.  I think triple sec is a little sweeter, but honestly it's been awhile.  I use some orange zest or marmalade in combination with the alcohol.

Yeah, what she said.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I like Cointreau, but wouldn't refuse Grand Marnier.  I think triple sec is a little sweeter, but honestly it's been awhile.  I use some orange zest or marmalade in combination with the alcohol.

Definitely Grand Marnier plus orange zest for me...or at least the Grand Marnier. Once you have used it, you'll never us either Cointreau or Triple Sec again. IMHO! :rolleyes:

And the zest should be in miniscule bits.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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Thanks, i actually had grand marnier and used it in my caramel, it does taste good.

I hope i can get a good orange flavour in ganache with it, i will try orange zest also.

What effect does the zest have on AW value, and shelf life.

Do you think orange confit would have a similar taste effect in the ganache?

Thanks everyone

Peter

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Thanks, i actually had grand marnier and used it in my caramel, it does taste good.

I hope i can get a good orange flavour in ganache with it, i will try orange zest also.

What effect does the zest have on AW value, and shelf life.

Do you think orange confit would have a similar taste effect in the ganache?

Thanks everyone

Peter

Grand Marnier in caramel? Yummm. You didn't say you were using it in caramel. Must try that.

I know nothing of AW values and actually don't know what confit is either...back to Google. Learn, learn, learn.... :rolleyes:

Post Google: gotcha

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Grand Marnier is brandy based, so you have that added flavor note which is generally delicious, but not a pure orange flavor.

I can't imagine a little orange zest having an effect on water activity, but you can also steep it in the cream and strain it out if you are worried or want a perfectly smooth ganache. Candied zest has low enough water to keep on its own for months or years, so it should be safe in ganache, don't you think?

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Grand Marnier is brandy based, so you have that added flavor note which is generally delicious, but not a pure orange flavor.

Which liqueur is the purest orangest flavor?

I have long thought to trying to make liqueurs... :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Cointreau is more pure orange. I don't know how many people could tell the difference once in ganache, but I think of Grand Marnier as a little more caramelly. I only have Cointreau here so I haven't tasted them side by side for awhile. It helps to work in a restaurant with a full bar that they leave unlocked so you can sample everything before using. :raz: Or, if your liquor store has the little airline bottles, get the different oranges you can find and see if they seem different to you.

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There are less expensive taste-alike alternatives available for both Grand Marnier and Cointreau. Gran Gala is almost identical to Grand Marnier and for an application where no one is going to see the bottle (unlike my situation where it's displayed on the back bar) will work perfectly. Luxardo Triplum is a dead ringer for Cointreau at about $8-$10 less per bottle. I've actually done a side-by-side blind taste test with this against the Cointreau and liked it better.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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:smile: Wow! So much interesting information...and so little chance of testing it out :sad: .

We are currently in a small Utah town with FEW choices in liqueurs...and then we live in Ontario near a small city with not many more. I have never seen either Gran Gala or Luxardo Triplum. Perhaps they are available in a large center like Toronto. But I will soldier on and try....

Not to mention that the cost of alcoholic libations can be up to 4X more in Canada than in the USA...again... :sad::sad::sad:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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A true British marmalade, one made with sour Seville oranges, would make the ganache very happy. Use a 60% chocolate if you do, as you don't want the contrast of chocolate bitter with orange bitter...or do you? :)

Fooey's Flickr Food Fotography

Brünnhilde, so help me, if you don't get out of the oven and empty the dishwasher, you won't be allowed anywhere near the table when we're flambeéing the Cherries Jubilee.

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I've tried a bunch of orange liqueurs, Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec, and Curacao, but the one that I really like is Orangecello.

Someone gave me a bottle of Everclear a while back so I think I'm going to try to make my own orangecello by infusing orange zest and maybe a bit of Hawaiian vanilla bean for a few months. I'm trying to get some K'au oranges from the island of Hawaii to use so I can have a "Hawaiianized" version of orangecello. Several friends have tangerine trees and I always end up with loads of tangerine so I may try some "tangerinecello" as well.

Besides using orange-flavored liqueur, try finding the cheapest orange brandy you can get your hands on and use it. I read an article in Cook's Illustrated a while back on how to make the best Cherries Jubilee and they mentioned that using a cheap supermarket orange brandy gave the best flavor. Problem is that most supermarkets I shop at don't carry orange brandy any more. Even specialty liquor stores I tried don't stock it. I do have a couple of very old bottles of Hiram Walker orange brandy somewhere in my pantry. We had our house fumigated and we had to box everything up and leave all of the edibles outside while the house was tented. Now I have to go through the various boxes looking for all of my cooking/baking ingredients. Tha's how a stumble on the Everclear. Should have labeled the outside of each box, but when you're in a rush to pack up...

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:smile: Wow!  So much interesting information...and so little chance of testing it out :sad: .

We are currently in a small Utah town with FEW choices in liqueurs...and then we live in Ontario near a small city with not many more. I have never seen either Gran Gala or Luxardo Triplum.  Perhaps they are available in a large center like Toronto.  But I will soldier on and try....

Not to mention that the cost of alcoholic libations can be up to 4X more in Canada than in the USA...again... :sad:  :sad:  :sad:

Neither is listed on the LCBO website so I am guessing NOT in Ontario! No surprise there.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Neither is listed on the LCBO website so I am guessing NOT in Ontario!  No surprise there.

Thanks, Anna N.

We went to the local liquor outlet and found the Grand Gala and it was $14.00 cheaper than the Grand Marnier. Did not buy any...have Grand Marnier already. Found another called Grand Monarch, $6 dollars less than the Grand Gala. Anyone know anything about it?

Then looked at the raspberry list. Chambord, which we have, and another called Chateau Monet. The Chambord is $19.99 for 375 ml and the Monet is $5.99 for 750 ml. Anyone know the Monet? or any other raspberry liqueur?

Thanks. What an extremely delicious topic. :wub::wub::wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Cointreau seems to have a punchier orange flavor than Grand Marnier to me. I find that it cuts through better in a 70% bittersweet ganache. (Also, it tastes better in margaritas where it creates an orange layer just beneath the lime flavor and just above the tequila.)

Grand Marnier is great but has more of a brandy flavor with a hint of orange...depends on your usage.

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A dash of orange juice concentrate - the frozen kind - might also be a good addition to intensify the orange flavor without adding the bitterness or chunks of zest/marmalade.

The Chateau Monet raspberry is decent. I think most of the not-the-top-shelf-brand-names but not-the-super-cheap-bottom-shelf-plastic-bottle stuff is generally decent, especially if you are using another form of the flavor as another layer, like a jam or puree or infusion along with the alcohol. You need a close friend who flies a lot and can get you everything duty free! My pilot brother keeps the whole family stocked for cocktails (best brother ever!).

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I've tried a bunch of orange liqueurs, Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec, and Curacao, but the one that I really like is Orangecello.

Someone gave me a bottle of Everclear a while back so I think I'm going to try to make my own orangecello by infusing orange zest and maybe a bit of Hawaiian vanilla bean for a few months.  I'm trying to get some K'au oranges from the island of Hawaii to use so I can have a "Hawaiianized" version of orangecello.  Several friends have tangerine trees and I always end up with loads of tangerine so I may try some "tangerinecello" as well.

Besides using orange-flavored liqueur, try finding the cheapest orange brandy you can get your hands on and use it.  I read an article in Cook's Illustrated a while back on how to make the best Cherries Jubilee and they mentioned that using a cheap supermarket orange brandy gave the best flavor.  Problem is that most supermarkets I shop at don't carry orange brandy any more.  Even specialty liquor stores I tried don't stock it.  I do have a couple of very old bottles of Hiram Walker orange brandy somewhere in my pantry.  We had our house fumigated and we had to box everything up and leave all of the edibles outside while the house was tented.  Now I have to go through the various boxes looking for all of my cooking/baking ingredients.  Tha's how a stumble on the Everclear.  Should have labeled the outside of each box, but when you're in a rush to pack up...

Thanks for your detailed information. It's all unfamiliar stuff to me and I doubt that Ontario liquor stores carry Orangecello, Everclear, K'au oranges, etc. :wink:

But I am going to chase it up when I get back home....

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Thanks for all the interesting information on orange and raspberry liqueurs. I am going to look it all up when I get back to Canada. And then I am going to return to my intention to make some liqueuers of my own. Yes, I am on an orange and raspberry kick. Mixed with chocolate. Of course. :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Thanks for all the interesting information on orange and raspberry liqueurs.  I am going to look it all up when I get back to Canada. 

. . .

Why wait! You can do it now: LCBO

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Why wait!  You can do it now:  LCBO

And so I did. Thanks. :smile: And was astounded at the number of alcoholic beverages which contain orange, raspberry and black raspberry.

Alas, I live near a smallish city which does not carry a lot of them. Still, I soldier on and make do with Chambord and Grand Marnier. Oh, the price.... :raz:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Just last week I had occasion to taste a chocolate sauce flavored with orange. The chef used orange oil, and I believe it was Boyajian. (Forgive my spelling if it's wrong.) It had a clear, intense orange flavor, and he said you don't need much at all. This might be something to consider as an option to orange liquors.

"Fat is money." (Per a cracklings maker shown on Dirty Jobs.)
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Darienne, when you are coming back across the border, stop at the duty free and pick up a couple of bottles of the 95% Everclear. It's about $15/liter.

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