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Fat Guy

Potato Puree, Mashed Potatoes, Pommes

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The advantage of fries in such situations is that they lend themselves so perfectly to getting their second dip in the oil just before being plated.

Agreed, and a gratin can be timed to come out of the oven and hang out on the stove top for a few while you plate everthing else. Its just those darned mashers . . .

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You might try this to hold the mashers until served:

Add a little extra cream, then put the bowl over a pot of barely simmering water. Cover flush with plastic wrap and a tight lid. They will purportedly keep for up to 2 hours. I have my doubts but it may very well do for the 20 minutes or so you need to finish up the rest of the meal.


--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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if you need them to hold for 20 minutes, maybe take them off the heat and put them back on when you only have ~10 minutes left... I can make them hold by putting them on super low heat and stirring every now & then. They don't last long this way though, so i like the idea of adding a bit of cream or butter just before serving.

maybe could even add fresh chopped herbs at this last minute too. Thyme is one of my faves in mashers.


Born Free, Now Expensive

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I agree with Huevos. Hold them on a bain marie (but not over an hour), monte au beurre before serving.

Or just time them to finish while the steaks rests (ten minutes minimum, but I never go less than twenty).


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Agreed. It's standard restaurant technique and seems to work brilliantly for mashed potatoes that have sufficient fat. It also happens to work well when entertaining at home. Typically a restaurant keeps a big pot going and takes some out and heats it in a small saucepan with additional fat. Me, I make my mashed potatoes with cream, butter, and olive oil (plus salt and white pepper of course). (!) I use a little less than I want and then add the final dosage over heat right before serving.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Me, I make my mashed potatoes with cream, butter, and olive oil (plus salt and white pepper of course). (!) I use a little less than I want and then add the final dosage over heat right before serving.

What kind of OO do you use? Is the point more fat, or if you use EVOO, does that add a layer of flavor or what....??

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I use super-premium EVOO (once I finish up the bottle of Don Alfonso I got from Jim Dixon's realgoodfood.com supply I'm going to bust open a bottle of Santi Santamaria's stuff), because the idea is to add another flavor rather than just more fat (the cream and butter are fine on their own for providing silkiness and lusciousness). I just happen to like the combination of the three. This is one of many examples of how I'm an American cook because I don't really care if there isn't a tradition supporting the combination of these fats in mashed potatoes -- I think the more the merrier (up to a point).


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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(!) I use a little less than I want and then add the final dosage over heat right before serving.

fat guy,

are you making mashed potatoes or sparkling wine? :smile:


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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I'm actually a total freak for the pairing of mashed potatoes and rose Champagne. That's a whole meal for me.

Now that's intersting!

What do you find so attractive pairing spuds and sparkling wine?


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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i gotta figure that restaurants aren't making mashed potatoes to order. after i realized this, i figured it's just a matter of extra milk/cream at cooking time. i often let them cool, and reheat, with a little extra milk or cream before serving. it seems too simple, but sometimes the most clever things are. i also eat them the day after, without much deterioration in quality (although i wouldn't serve the leftover version to guests)

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I'm actually a total freak for the pairing of mashed potatoes and rose Champagne. That's a whole meal for me.

Steven I hope you are serious. Chuck makes mashed potatoes... and in them he adds Champagne. They are quite tasty. One of the better savory things he can make.

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Sugar and fat, Cape. That's what it's all about.

Must be the Mid-Westerner in him craving the Sugar and Fat. That makes sense now.

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I love the Bengali version of mashed potatoes. ALoo Bharta.

In this they add Mustard Oil, finely chopped green chiles and very finely minced cilantro greens. It is amazing.

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Sugar and fat, Cape. That's what it's all about.

So are you using a sweet rose? I assume so if this is where the sugar comes from.


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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as suvir suggests, mashed potatoes have been just sitting there waiting for something really incredible to happen to them (although in their most simple form, they are near perfect). although not on topic, i would love to persue discussion on this.

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as suvir suggests, mashed potatoes have been just sitting there waiting for something really incredible to happen to them (although in their most simple form, they are near perfect).  although not on topic, i would love to persue discussion on this.

Tommy, mashed potatoes are the one dish in the whole wide world, that I would not eat very happily. I find no magic in it, whatsoever. And I love simple foods cooked well.

I have been taken by foodies to several places where they swore I would once and for all understand t his dish, but nope, nothing changed. I came back finding it the same mediocre dish I consider it to be. And yet, I am fully aware of how strongly so many people feel about it.

The only way I can eat mashed potatoes, are the Bengali way.

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And yes I did seem to enjoy the Mashed Potatoes with Champagne that I ate last. Chuck makes these and they are always great. There was something nicer about them than even the sinfully truffled mashed potatoes I ate a couple of years ago when a restaurant owner was trying desperately to charm me and convert me into a mashed potato believer.

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Billecart Salmon NV is my house-label rose and I don't think it's all that sweet. But it's got enough of the sugary/fruity thing balanced with enough crisp acidity to work beautifully with the creaminess of mashed potatoes. It's actually a creamy wine itself, but in this instance I think the textural similarity is reinforcing rather than dull.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Tommy, mashed potatoes are the one dish in the whole wide world, that I would not eat very happily.  I find no magic in it, whatsoever.  And I love simple foods cooked well. 

ok, now i'm back to not liking you very much again. :unsure:

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Tommy, mashed potatoes are the one dish in the whole wide world, that I would not eat very happily.  I find no magic in it, whatsoever.  And I love simple foods cooked well.  

ok, now i'm back to not liking you very much again. :unsure:

SHould I be worried? I never thought you liked me in the first place. :shock:

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Tommy, mashed potatoes are the one dish in the whole wide world, that I would not eat very happily.  I find no magic in it, whatsoever.  And I love simple foods cooked well.  

ok, now i'm back to not liking you very much again. :unsure:

Maybe for one of the eGullet events, you can make your favorite recipe for mashed potatoes, bring them with you, make me taste them, and who knows, I may change my mind.

I would love to learn to how enjoy them. I have the desire... Now all I need is to taste a great version.... and I am sure I will be converted for life.

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Suvir, you're eating the mashed potatoes? No, no, no silly man. You're supposed to smear them all over your body and run around while drinking Champagne. Nobody eats them.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I would love to learn to how enjoy them.  I have the desire... Now all I need is to taste a great version.... and I am sure I will be converted for life.

butter. salt. cream. i mean, what's there not to like?

roasted garlic? c'mon! chives? cilantro? basil? chopmeat? au jus? rosemary? all at once for that matter. :wacko:

thai curry paste? curry powder?

it's a clean slate. have your way with it, and get back to me. :smile:

edit: somehow my post seems less effective with the image of fat guy's suggestion racing through my head.

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