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Fat Guy

Potato Puree, Mashed Potatoes, Pommes

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I've used the steeping in cream method as described in the Balatzar cook book and I really like the results. Basically bring milk or cream to a slow simmer and add some garlic cloves to steep in the milk and soften (a sprig of thyme is good - or a little dried thyme). Mash the garlic with the potatoes (I run everything through the ricer). It means that she does not have to turn on the oven - keeps everything on the stove top. I would say 4 or 5 cloves would be good for garlic beginners. :wink:


Edited by canucklehead (log)

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Or even simpler, toss the peeled cloves in with the potatoes to cook. I usually use a bit of milk in the cooking water.


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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I don't know the restaurant equivilent but I have a question for you - are you advising her to put fresh garlic in the potatoes or are you going to have her roast some garlic and then add it?

My thought would be to roast the garlic (cut the top off, put in shallow dish, fill with water to be level with garlic, cover with lid or foil and roast for 45 minutes or until soft at about 400)

Squoosh out the garlic cloves and mix/mash in with the mashed potatoes, butter, salt, pepper, cream - however she likes to make the potatoes.

I would advise two or three roasted cloves per potato when making the dish.

Then you can always add more if you want more garlic.

Any leftover? Spread on your bread!

Della...I so much appreciate your recipe for Garlic Mashed Potatoes. In fact, it's one of the best discovered on this end. I have made a print for imminent use. We will meticulously follow the script.

Many restaurants now have this item on their respective menus, a certain indicator that people are developing a taste for the dish.


Dr. Paul N. Gervais

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I would definitely recommend roasting the garlic too.  And - for sheer ease of use - I like those little ceramic garlic roasters.  They'll only take one head at a time - but they're cheap - and a whole head of garlic ought to be plenty unless she's cooking for a bunch of people.  Robyn

Now I need at least one of these things! Garlic roasters?


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I always do the simmering in cream method. IMHO, that gives the deepst, most evenly distributed garlic flavour.


PS: I am a guy.

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Or even simpler, toss the peeled cloves in with the potatoes to cook.  I usually use a bit of milk in the cooking water.

Yep. Throw in a 2-3 cloves for each potato. And if you use a food mill to purée, you don't even have to peel the garlic or the spuds. After puréeing, add butter or olive oil. Thin with warm milk or cream and/or the potato-garlic liqueur. The other suggested methods are fine in their own right, but this is the simplest and purest.


Edited by carswell (log)

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a librarian who doesn't know how to make garlic mash? :shock: check to see if she really has her mls.

would go with the simmer method. and make sure to check if she knows how to smash and peel the garlic.

hey, wait - she works in a library. she should be able to find the 641's (that's cookbooks for y'all). now i would really check to see if she has her degree. :hmmm:

Susan K. Simovich

MLS, SUNY Albany 1979


Edited by suzilightning (log)
  • Like 1

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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a librarian who doesn't know how to make garlic mash?  :shock:  check to see if she really has her mls.

would go with the simmer method.  and make sure to check if she knows how to smash and peel the garlic.

hey, wait - she works in a library.  she should be able to find the 641's (that's cookbooks for y'all).  now i would really check to see if she has her degree. :hmmm:

I was thinking the same thing, suzi. Mind you, I didn't want to act like some bibliographic bouncer.

I'd go with roasting the garlic heads in the oven, make the mashed potatoes, then add the garlic. There's a basic recipe in the All New All Purpose Joy of Cooking, p. 378 (roasted garlic) & 408 (mashed potatoes).

BTW, the call nos. for the Library of Congress Subject Heading Cookery (Potatoes) are: TX803.P8 (LC call no.) and 641.6/521 (Dewey call no.).

rjwong (MSLS, UNC-Chapel Hill, 1989)


Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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a librarian who doesn't know how to make garlic mash?  :shock:  check to see if she really has her mls.

would go with the simmer method.  and make sure to check if she knows how to smash and peel the garlic.

hey, wait - she works in a library.  she should be able to find the 641's (that's cookbooks for y'all).  now i would really check to see if she has her degree. :hmmm:

I was thinking the same thing, suzi. Mind you, I didn't want to act like some bibliographic bouncer.

I'd go with roasting the garlic heads in the oven, make the mashed potatoes, then add the garlic. There's a basic recipe in the All New All Purpose Joy of Cooking, p. 378 (roasted garlic) & 408 (mashed potatoes).

BTW, the call nos. for the Library of Congress Subject Heading Cookery (Potatoes) are: TX803.P8 (LC call no.) and 641.6/521 (Dewey call no.).

rjwong (MSLS, UNC-Chapel Hill, 1989)

:laugh:

I use the throw-it-in-the-pot method myself, and tried to describe it to her.

She has trouble taking the rubber bands off of stuff I've ordered through ILL (she once almost put out one of my eyes by accident), and can't work the computers to save her life.

I didn't think she would be able to roast it, so didn't try to describe that, though I've had good results with that before, myself. That turns out so very mellow that you almost CAN'T have too much garlic.


Edited by crinoidgirl (log)

V

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Or even simpler, toss the peeled cloves in with the potatoes to cook.

That's what I do as well. Seems to add a nice, mild garlic flavor. If the librarian is a garlic novice, this is what I would recommend. Definitely the easiest thing to do.

I would definitely recommend roasting the garlic too.  And - for sheer ease of use - I like those little ceramic garlic roasters.

Now I need at least one of these things! Garlic roasters?

Eh. I used to have one but eventually got rid of it. There's nothing simpler than just plopping a head (or several heads, or a handful of peeled garlic) onto a sheet of heavy aluminum foil, drizzling on a little evoo and sea salt, bunching the whole thing up and tossing it in the oven for half an hour. Nothing to clean afterwards, scalable from one clove to several heads of garlic simultaneously, no storage issues.


--

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I think with the garlic cloves in the cooking water, you throw away more flavor than you get in your potatoes.

Another thing to do, if you don't want to oven roast garlic, is just to peel, halve, and simmer it in a small pot on top of the stove in the milk, (cream, chicken stock, butter, olive oil, whatever,) you are going to add to your potatoes. Garlic also typically takes longer to cook to tender than potatoes do, so you want to start it simmering, (or roasting,) a bit before you start your potatoes.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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FWIW, Cooks Illustrated has a smoked paprika and garlic mashed potatoe recipe that includes 3 smashed cloves to 2lbs russet potatoes. The garlic is sauteed in 4oz butter over low heat for 12-14 minutes. With this recipe, you could add the garlic butter bit-by-bit to suit your taste, but since there is only 1.5 cloves per lb of potatoes, I'm sure you would use it all and maybe a bit more.

PS - Love your user name, crinoidgirl. I used to collect crinoids and other marine fossils near my old house.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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OK, here is what i do when I am fixing a quick garlic mash.

"micorwave oven in use"

I place 2-3 cloves of garlic per person (can use more or less) into a micorwave safe coffee cup, cover with milk, zap for approx. 60 secs. Don't have to peel, the peel with slip right off once they are cooked.

Boil potatoes (or sometimes I will even zap them also - less nutrient loss?)

add garlic milk, garlic, and butter to potatoes.

Mash,

S and P to tast.

This is a quick way to make mashed, I can have them on the table before the garlic butter above would be cooked. Not that those don't sound yummy.

Roasted garlic is great, sometimes even a little too sweet. This is more gently and you dont loose any of the flavor in the cooking.

I will also milk zap garlic for dishes such as cilantro-parsley pesto. Takes just a little of the raw bite away for the people that are more sensitive.

Paul

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I would definitely recommend roasting the garlic too.  And - for sheer ease of use - I like those little ceramic garlic roasters.
Eh.  I used to have one but eventually got rid of it.  There's nothing simpler than just plopping a head (or several heads, or a handful of peeled garlic) onto a sheet of heavy aluminum foil, drizzling on a little evoo and sea salt, bunching the whole thing up and tossing it in the oven for half an hour.  Nothing to clean afterwards, scalable from one clove to several heads of garlic simultaneously, no storage issues.

You New Yorkers never do have enough closet space :smile: . Your way probably works fine. The little garlic roaster (which I won at a tennis party grab bag) works fine too. By the way - it's no problem at all in terms of cleaning. Robyn


Edited by robyn (log)

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Hi,

I am looking for the a good garlic mash potato recipe for my pre-thanksgiving dinner my wife and i are having this saturday. Is this what most places use? Can anyone post a recipe with quantities of each ingredient? my favorite garlic mash potatoes are from that restaurant carrabas.

OK, here is what i do when I am fixing a quick garlic mash.

"micorwave oven in use"

I place 2-3 cloves of garlic per person (can use more or less) into a micorwave safe coffee cup, cover with milk, zap for approx. 60 secs.  Don't have to peel, the peel with slip right off once they are cooked.

Boil potatoes (or sometimes I will even zap them also - less nutrient loss?)

add garlic milk, garlic, and butter to potatoes.

Mash,

S and P to tast.

This is a quick way to make mashed, I can have them on the table before the garlic butter above would be cooked.  Not that those don't sound yummy.

Roasted garlic is great, sometimes even a little too sweet.  This is more gently and you dont loose any of the flavor in the cooking.

I will also milk zap garlic for dishes such as cilantro-parsley pesto.  Takes just a little of the raw bite away for the people that are more sensitive.

Paul

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Here's the recipe I use, adapted from Cook's Illustrated. Adjust

2lbs russet potatoes

3cloves/1.5t garlic, or to taste.

1 stick/8T butter (salted or unsalted)

1C half/half, warmed

S&P to taste

Cut up the potatoes and boil them till tender, 20-30 minutes. Mash them up a bit.

Melt butter in small pan over low heat. Add garlic. Cook for about 10-12 minutes, until garlic just starts to brown. Let cool a few minutes, then strain out the garlic bits.

Add garlic butter and half and half to potatoes, and S&P to taste, and mix til combined. Top wservings with garlic bits.

Hi,

I am looking for the a good garlic mash potato recipe for my pre-thanksgiving dinner my wife and i are having this saturday. Is this what most places use? Can anyone post a recipe with quantities of each ingredient? my favorite garlic mash potatoes are from that restaurant carrabas.

OK, here is what i do when I am fixing a quick garlic mash.

"micorwave oven in use"

I place 2-3 cloves of garlic per person (can use more or less) into a micorwave safe coffee cup, cover with milk, zap for approx. 60 secs.  Don't have to peel, the peel with slip right off once they are cooked.

Boil potatoes (or sometimes I will even zap them also - less nutrient loss?)

add garlic milk, garlic, and butter to potatoes.

Mash,

S and P to tast.

This is a quick way to make mashed, I can have them on the table before the garlic butter above would be cooked.  Not that those don't sound yummy.

Roasted garlic is great, sometimes even a little too sweet.  This is more gently and you dont loose any of the flavor in the cooking.

I will also milk zap garlic for dishes such as cilantro-parsley pesto.  Takes just a little of the raw bite away for the people that are more sensitive.

Paul


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Of course, these are all vastly different flavors: Roast garlic, sauteed garlic, and boiled garlic are three separate animals. IMX, the Italian restaurant standard (and the more popular generally) is roasted garlic mashed potatoes, due in no small part to the fact that roasted garlic is easy, uses no burner space, is a common by-product of other premade roasted products (tomatoes, for instance), and keeps forever. I'd recommend the roasting option to your friend, since it's probably the flavor that she remembers from the restaurants.


Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"

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Ka-BUMBPT.

I had to make Thanksgiving dinner early this year, and went super-trad: turkey, squash, dressing, gravy, cranberry sauce, brussels sprouts. Since it was going to be the basics, I wanted to do them very well, and thus turned to Shirley Corriher's mashed potato recipe (based on Jeffrey Steingarten's version). Basically, you slice taters in 1/3" slices, simmer at precisely 160F for 20 minutes, cool down immediately in running water, and then finish with a quick five minute boil, mashing/ricing, butter, pepper, etc.

Did the first steps using yukon golds through the cooling, and I'm here to tell you that the water was at 160.0F precisely. Roasted some garlic and heated cream, mashed garlic, salt and pepper on stove. When I was just about ready to serve everything, I put the potatoes back on the stove, brought plenty of water to the boil, and set the timer for five minutes. Beep. Not done, no problems, it's all good.

Few more minutes. Beep. Still not done. (Sliced turkey now cooling on the sideboard.)

Five more. Beep. Beep. Not done. (Family drooling.)

Ten more. Beep. Beep. Beep. Beep. Not done. (Family toying with knives at table.)

Screwed, I drained them, mashed them, added the cream, and served them. 1/3 of the mess consisted of little nubs of uncooked potato.

What the hell happened? Any tuber technicians out there?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I think its 170F not 160 F to fix the starch, but it won't matter. Its the cooling that is important.

Afterwards cook them just like normal potato. That is more like 20 mins after coming to the boil, rather then 5. Then you can mash them or evn use a hand blender.

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Without ever trying this method, my first reaction would be they won't get done at that temperature. That's more a hot water bath than a cooking temperature.

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I think its 170F not 160 F to fix the starch, but it won't matter. Its the cooling that is important.

Afterwards cook them just like normal potato. That is more like 20 mins after coming to the boil, rather then 5.  Then you can mash them or evn use a hand blender.

Weird. Corriher states that the temp should be 140-160F. Where did you get 170F, Jack? She also says 5 min, not 20. And, I gotta tell you, I cooked them for close to 30 and there were particles of uncooked potato. I was afraid of waterlogging them.

Without ever trying this method, my first reaction would be they won't get done at that temperature. That's more a hot water bath than a cooking temperature.

As Jack points out, it's not to cook them but to "retrograde" the starch, preventing it from releasing when you mash, preventing gluey taters.

edited to clarify references -- ca


Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Hmm..probably my confusion and conversion from 60C-70C. (e.g McGee 2nd edition p458).

I meant after cooling reboil the potatos for the normal length of time - say 20 mins.

Potato starch retrogration is discussed in many food science papers since its an important step in making dried potato flakes, and many snack foods.

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I'll try it again with a longer second boil and report back. This time, however, no turkey cooling while impatient loved ones linger. :hmmm:

Question: can water quality (soft-/hardness, etc.) have an effect?

edited to add question -- ca


Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Nope water quality has very little effect. Most add some salt to the water the potatoes are boiled in, but I think this has marginal effect, as little is retained compared to the amount of salt you add when mashing.

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