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Verjuice

eG Foodblog: Verjuice - Red, Green or Christmas?

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Wow, your picturs are sensational.  Tell us more about your camera and its settings.  It's really hard to do what you're doing, those extreme close ups.  I'm way impressed.  And the Tara's menu is thrilling.

Thanks for saying that! I own about forty old manual cameras and used to repair them when I was in college, but this is my first digital camera. I bought it last month so that I could do this blog, and pretty much learned to use it properly a day or two before starting. I had never even held one before I bought this one! :shock:

I made shopping for a digital camera into a project. I drew charts and tables of pros and cons, read every available review on a dozen websites, and narrowed it down to a few based on my needs. I wanted a great macro setting, excellent image quality, and some manual features for low light conditions.

I ended up with a Lumix DMC-TZ3 with a 28 mm wide angle Leica DC Vario-Elmar lens and 10x Optical IS Zoom. It wasn't in my top five but of my top ten choices it was the only one immediately available, and I knew I had to make a decision or else this quest for the perfect camera would never end.

I took the pictures of the rolls with the macro setting near a NE facing window.

Occasionally, I will use iPhoto to make a few cosmetic adjustments before posting, but I didn't think I needed to with of the above photos.

eta: I should probably mention that all of the pictures of the UAE were taken by my 16 year-old sister a few weeks ago while we traveled around the UAE, hitting up all those spots together. She asked me if I wanted to learn how to use her camera but I turned her down, then bought my own right after I got back to the U.S. She uploaded the pics to my Mac.


Edited by Verjuice (log)

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Maria's was a favorite spot, for fajitas. Is Molly's Mexican Kitchen still operating? Dave's Not Here?

Dave's is still there (or "here", I suppose. Never did figure out the name).

American culture trivia-geek popping up here to report that "Dave's Not Here" is a catch-phrase from an old Cheech and Chong stoner-comedy routine. Which causes me to assume the establishment bearing that name has (or had) some sort of counter-cultural quality? :cool:

But I'm already imagining thin lenthwise slices of the stuff lubed up with olive oil

Eeek, mizducky! I think I've just found another contribution to the thread about words/phrases that should never be used regarding food! :laugh:

Heh. I confess that word usage is not original to me; in fact, I think I picked it up from some poster or posters somewhere here on eGullet. :laugh:

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Thanks for saying that! I own about forty old manual cameras and used to repair them when I was in college, but this is my first digital camera. I bought it last month so that I could do this blog, and pretty much learned to use it properly a day or two before starting. I had never even held one before I bought this one!  :shock: 

Well I am shocked! Mainly because I've been working in midtown Manhattan for years and "would you take our picture?" is as common as "how do I get to ___". So ages before I owned a digital I had to learn how to use one.

It just goes to show that it's more important to have a good eye than a fancy camera. And you, lady, have a good eye :biggrin:


To hell with poverty! We'll get drunk on cheap wine - Gang of Four

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I own about forty old manual cameras and used to repair them when I was in college, but this is my first digital camera.

I made shopping for a digital camera into a project. I drew charts and tables of pros and cons, read every available review on a dozen websites, and narrowed it down to a few based on my needs. I wanted a great macro setting, excellent image quality, and some manual features for low light conditions.

I ended up with a Lumix DMC-TZ3 with a 28 mm wide angle Leica DC Vario-Elmar lens and 10x Optical IS Zoom. It wasn't in my top five but of my top ten choices it was the only one immediately available, and I knew I had to make a decision or else this quest for the perfect camera would never end.

If Chris were ever going to be interested in a younger woman---you'd have his full attention with all the old cameras. I can see about twenty of his on the shelf just above the computer desk. He's a list-maker and a pro/con graph fella, too, pondering all the advantages and perks, etc. before he buys. (And I love that I've "inherited" his next-oldest one for all my little snappings as I cook and serve).

"WE" photographed an East Indian wedding a few weeks ago, and I know the caterers were wondering about the crazy lady getting shot after shot along the buffet---probably not a customary wedding shot. It was all fabulous, and I got their recipe for cilantro chutney---HOTTT.

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"WE" photographed an East Indian wedding a few weeks ago, and I know the caterers were wondering about the crazy lady getting shot after shot along the buffet---probably not a customary wedding shot.  It was all fabulous, and I got their recipe for cilantro chutney---HOTTT.

Racheld, care to share that recipe? That sounds good. Thanks in advance.

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Good evening, everyone. I almost went to the Bobcat Bite today to show you guys the famous green chile cheeseburgers that get a fair amount of justifiable press, but then my out of town friend and lunch partner told me that he is avoiding red meat right now.

It turned out for the best. I realized that I hadn't yet taken you to the Plaza, and it seemed high time for a visit to Pasqual's.

The Lensic on San Francisco:

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Water St.:

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Home of the first Frito pie:

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Edited by Verjuice (log)

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The Plaza:

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St. Francis Cathedral:

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Ristras drying in the sun:

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I had never been inside The Chile Shop before, but we were waiting for a table at Pasqual's and it was right next door. It was fun seeing Santa Fe with fresh eyes like a tourist. I'd never even photographed the Plaza before today, but I enjoyed myself very much.

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This is for Abra, with humble respects:

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Pasqual's:

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The interior is decorated with prayer flags that remind me of the Day of the Dead color scheme, along with other random paraphernalia:

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We were freezing cold when we were seated, so we both warmed our hand on mugs of hot tea. Mint for him, Ceylon Breakfast for me.

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He had mole enchiladas with Rosie's free-range chicken, hold the dairy. Cilantro rice and corn tortilla on the side:

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I ended up ordering something that wouldn't normally leap off the page at me but today was exactly what I wanted. Baked mac and cheese with poblanos, spinach and turkey bacon. The salad had kumquats, candied garlic, pomegranate seeds, radishes and Maytag blue cheese. It was excellent.

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I did myself proud, as always:

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Edited by Verjuice (log)

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Uhm- if you are not gonna finish that last gooey crunchy thing at the top of the plate please send it my way...Really enjoying the tour of the town. I have never had any inclination to visit Santa Fe but it is now on my hit parade.

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For dinner, I met up with my friend Brandon at the new Coyote Cafe. I never liked this place when it was owned by Mark Miller, however it was bought a few weeks ago by Eric DeStefano of Geronimo and partners. Chef DeStefano brought his signature elk dish from Geronimo to Coyote Cafe with him, and it was difficult not to order it because I love it so much. Sorry about the picture quality; it was dark.

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Cocktail menu:

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Edited by Verjuice (log)

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By "Living Butter Lettuce" I assume they mean the Boston lettuce that's hydroponically grown and sold with the root system attached? Does this place grow its own?


Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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OMG! It all looks so delicious, I'm ready to pack up and head for Santa Fe. That mac & cheese looks just too good.

Love the idea of the shortstack, too.

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Interestingly enough there's a place in Southern NM that is within days of becoming the largest organic, hydroponic farm in the country. Its being paired with what is already considered the largest, pure-strain tilapia farm in the country. The tilapia farm used to only do fingerlings, but has in the past year upgraded to full size for market, and will be (I guess) using the fish poop to help grow the plants. The farm isn't operational yet, so this lettuce came from somewhere else.

My connection is that a friend is the computer guy behind the whole operation and I've been talking to him about growing micro greens for me to use and sell.

Even more interesting is this is all being financed by the Chinese since they're looking for investments with the dollar being so low.

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Interestingly enough there's a place in Southern NM that is within days of becoming the largest organic, hydroponic farm in the country.  Its being paired with what is already considered the largest, pure-strain tilapia farm in the country.  The tilapia farm used to only do fingerlings, but has in the past year upgraded to full size for market, and will be (I guess) using the fish poop to help grow the plants.  The farm isn't operational yet, so this lettuce came from somewhere else.

My connection is that a friend is the computer guy behind the whole operation and I've been talking to him about growing micro greens for me to use and sell.

Even more interesting is this is all being financed by the Chinese since they're looking for investments with the dollar being so low.

That's fascinating. I had no idea.

Oh, and I keep meaning to ask- did you make it to to the Hatch Chile Festival this year?

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I was salivating reading the Coyote Cafe menu, even before seeing your pictures. I did notice a lot of seafood (crabcakes, scallops, lobster, sea bass) – how well does seafood survive the trip to NM?

I am not even going to cut and paste pictures of those cruelly delicious cinnamon rolls, because it will just make me hungry again. I have a particular thing for ultracinnamony cinnamon rolls with not-too-sweet cream cheese icing.

Ristras drying in the sun:

gallery_11735_5545_432617.jpg

I would love to live somewhere with enough rain to garden without irrigation, yet low enough humidity to dry chile ristras outside. Probably no such place on earth, unfortunately. Here, ristras would rot outdoors so we need to dry chiles with a dehydrator.

He had mole enchiladas with Rosie's free-range chicken, hold the dairy. Cilantro rice and corn tortilla on the side:

gallery_11735_5545_564513.jpg

I ended up ordering something that wouldn't normally leap off the page at me but today was exactly what I wanted. Baked mac and cheese with poblanos, spinach and turkey bacon. The salad had kumquats, candied garlic, pomegranate seeds, radishes and Maytag blue cheese. It was excellent.

gallery_11735_5545_355448.jpg

Whoa, now that is what I’m talking about.

Short Stack:

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And that. Yum. Sorry to ask another question way at the end of a long post, but do you cook much New Mexican-style food yourself, or do you usually take advantage of its availability and cook other types of food at home?

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I was salivating reading the Coyote Cafe menu, even before seeing your pictures. I did notice a lot of seafood (crabcakes, scallops, lobster, sea bass) – how well does seafood survive the trip to NM?

Depends on the restaurant. I have never experienced (or heard of) any reputable place here serving anything less than stellar fish; it's a tough restaurant town and diners tend to be quite discriminating. Whole Foods and Wild Oats have fresh fish coming in constantly (at an elevated price).

We have a superb Japanese restaurant here named Shohko, and I know that their fish is shipped is shipped fresh every other day. I have had a lot of lackluster sushi in coastal towns, including a very disappointing recent experience at a highly lauded Japanese restaurant in Seattle, where I had high expectations of the meal. We are fortunate to have Shohko in our little mountain enclave; because of the owners' high standards and work ethic, I believe it would be a successful addition to any restaurant community. I will probably eat there more often now that the fabulous izakaya Kasasoba (formerly my favorite restaurant in town) is gone.

I am not even going to cut and paste pictures of those cruelly delicious cinnamon rolls, because it will just make me hungry again. I have a particular thing for ultracinnamony cinnamon rolls with not-too-sweet cream cheese icing.

They are truly sensational.

I would love to live somewhere with enough rain to garden without irrigation, yet low enough humidity to dry chile ristras outside. Probably no such place on earth, unfortunately. Here, ristras would rot outdoors so we need to dry chiles with a dehydrator.

This has been the wettest year ever for Santa Fe. Nobody can remember a time before this year when we weren't in a drought. It's been a blissful approximation of the heaven that you described above!

Sorry to ask another question way at the end of a long post, but do you cook much New Mexican-style food yourself, or do you usually take advantage of its availability and cook other types of food at home?

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I just took this photo of roasted green chiles for you, to demonstrate the success of my ongoing quest to bring more local ingredients into my kitchen. This happens every year; my sincerest intentions end up bagged, frozen and forgotten about until the following year. :unsure:

When I crave Northern New Mexican food, which isn't often, it's so much more fun to go out and get the whole nine yards; sopaipillas, margaritas, red and green chile, freshly fried tortillas.

It probably doesn't help my half-hearted mission that I live within a stone's throw of about ten places that do it really well.

I know I haven't shown you much cooking in this blog, but I'm hoping for a radical turnaround before it ends tomorrow night.


Edited by Verjuice (log)

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I'm loving this blog! What a great way to learn more about my new home. We've never been to Cloud Cliff Bakery, Tara's or Chocolate Smith. They are all on the list for must try places. Cafe Pasqual's is a favorite. The atmosphere and food are always great. In spite of some so-so reviews of Coyote Cafe under its previous ownership, we had an absolutely wonderful meal there back in May. Glad to hear good things about the new owners. We too have roasted green chiles - a whole bushel! We started off using them quite often, but we've gotten lazy lately. Finally gave away some to a neighbor in an effort to get a little extra room back in the freezer. Totally understand why you prefer to get your "christmas" out rather than get it all together at home. My favorite meals to go out for are breakfast and lunch. I love it that there are so many places that provide wonderful breakfast burritos most of the day. Especially like the potatoes that come with them at The Pantry. Keep up the great work!


KathyM

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I couldn't quite cope with the thought of going to Whole Foods and picking up a few things to make breakfast with at home, and I wanted a cup of coffee and the Sunday paper, so I headed for The Chocolate Maven. I got there the moment they opened, so thankfully there was no wait for a table. The wait was getting crazy by the time I left, thirty minutes later.

These guys do a huge wholesale business, selling their pastries at various retail outlets, coffee shops, and the indomitable Whole Foods. Personally, I prefer the savory food at the cafe to any of their baked goods. High-altitude baking is not something that everyone in town does well.

The Chocolate Maven is located inconspicuously at the back of this alley behind a auto repair shop. It may look a little dubious on the outside, but once you step inside, it's wonderfully warm and charming.

They hang banners of their accolades on the corrugated aluminum siding just outside. As you can see, they are a local favorite for breakfast and brunch:

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Just inside the cafe is a newly renovated bakery for retail:

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The open pastry kitchen was quiet this early on a Sunday, but is normally raging.

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The hot chocolate menu:

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Their word of honor:

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