Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
emsny

Hot bread and belly-aches

Recommended Posts

Over on the Restaurant Life forum the topic "Some thoughts on restaurant bread rituals" briefly touched on the question of why freshly baked bread gives you a belly ache if you eat it when it is still hot. Does anybody here in the Baking forum have an answer?


Edited by emsny (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hot bread is squishy, and extra tasty you can eat 1,000 times more voila! tummy ache.


does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My own reactions depend on the bread. Most white breads -- bagels, baguettes, Parker House rolls -- don't give me a belly-ache when eaten warm. Heavier breads based on whole wheat and rye flours, however, do.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never experienced or known of the phenomenon of hot bread bellyaches. And I've eaten a lot of hot bread in my day.

However........ :laugh:

I do know that raw bread dough gives you a heck of a tummy ache.

Think of all that yeast workin' in your stomach. Yeah baby.

Uh, not that I've actually eaten raw bread dough. :wink::laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still hot as in right out of the oven hot? One Mr Alton Brown mentions that you have to let bread rest one half hour before slicing so protein and starch structures have time to set. My guess would be there is some kind gas exchange thing going on which might carry over into your tummy. Just a guess though.

I'm also guessing most warm bread in a restaurant came out of a bread warmer and not an oven though. Kinda shoots my first theory straight to Hell huh?


"And in the meantime, listen to your appetite and play with your food."

Alton Brown, Good Eats

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

perhaps you're intolerant to yeast...like me :(


Pastry PRincess

a day without love, laughter or dessert is a day wasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

by the time bread comes out of the oven, the yeast is long dead...aside from alcohol and carbon dioxide (which should also have evaporated by then), what is residual in hot bread that wouldn't be there in cold bread?

i've never heard of this phenomenon and i've eaten a ton of hot bread in my life, either heated or fresh out of the oven.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

real bread-heads tell us that bread is best appreciated after it's cooled. but i remain a philistine and love nothing more than hot, fresh-baked bread ... cool enough to be done cooking in the middle, warm enough to melt butter. never had a belly ache, but might be able to blame a violent crime or two on it.

any thoughts on why bread is supposedly better cool?


Notes from the underbelly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
any thoughts on why bread is supposedly better cool?

Well I suppose the artisan bread maker will tell you that you can enjoy the crispiness of a properly baked loaf better when it's cool, and I do know that when you eat something that's fairly warm, you do miss out on subtle flavor nuances. I'm one of those people that likes to let my food cool down to nearly room temp before I eat it......it truly tastes better that way.

Except bread of course. I have been known to tear into a loaf like a caveman when it's hot out of the oven! :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
real bread-heads tell us that bread is best appreciated after it's cooled. but i remain a philistine and love nothing more than hot, fresh-baked bread ... cool enough to be done cooking in the middle, warm enough to melt butter. never had a belly ache, but might be able to blame a violent crime or two on it.

any thoughts on why bread is supposedly better cool?

to allow for final evaporation of moisture

finishing of starch gelatinization and protein coagulation...notice when you slice warm bread that it is a bit gummy? that's the starch and moisture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never experienced or known of the phenomenon of hot bread bellyaches. And I've eaten a lot of hot bread in my day.

However........ :laugh:

I do know that raw bread dough gives you a heck of a tummy ache.

Think of all that yeast workin' in your stomach. Yeah baby.

Uh, not that I've actually eaten raw bread dough. :wink:  :laugh:

There was an old episode of Adam-12 where they responded to a house where a man had eaten a loaf of raw bread dough and his stomach "Rised" and it was funny cause the fake tummy they gave him was a rectangle.


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There was an old episode of Adam-12 where they responded to a house where a man had eaten a loaf of raw bread dough and his stomach "Rised" and it was funny cause the fake tummy they gave him was a rectangle.

I saw this, and I'm sure it was "Emergency!" I never watched Adam-12. It actually made me try bread dough once, since apparently it was tasty. I didn't enjoy it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There was an old episode of Adam-12 where they responded to a house where a man had eaten a loaf of raw bread dough and his stomach "Rised" and it was funny cause the fake tummy they gave him was a rectangle.

If it were an Emergency!/Adam-12 episode made today, the belly shape they would have given him would have been probably a pain como or a baguette, complete with the slashes in the top of the loaf....... :laugh:

Back then, artisanal bread was Wonder Bread............. :wacko:


Edited by chefpeon (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There was an old episode of Adam-12 where they responded to a house where a man had eaten a loaf of raw bread dough and his stomach "Rised" and it was funny cause the fake tummy they gave him was a rectangle.

I saw this, and I'm sure it was "Emergency!" I never watched Adam-12. It actually made me try bread dough once, since apparently it was tasty. I didn't enjoy it.

You are correct!

Season 5, Episode 22: The Great Crash Diet

Original Air Date: 21 February 1976

Conducting a fire inspection, Roy and John rescue a diver in a fish tank. A birthday boy eats raw dough and gets a stomachache. An experiment in firefighter nutrition becomes an obsession for Chet. A woman goes into labor while her mother experiences chest pains. Capt. Stanley is severely injured when he gets an electric shock from a fallen power line.


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I began working in my mom's bakery when I was 15.

We used to unload the oven, knock the loaves of the pans and as soon as we finished the first batch, split a loaf lengthwise and slather on the butter (purchased in 30-pound tins - this was, after all, Wisconsin!) chop it into chunks with a dough knife and consume it while it was still hot.

I don't recall ever having a bellyache. Or gaining weight - I was about a size-seven at the time and remained so for the next 25 years. I still eat bread straight from the oven, or when it has cooled enough to pick up without burning my fingers.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with above-never heard the bellyache angle.

If it's hurting your stomach you didn't apply enough butter or jam! :raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Shakers, according to one source I read, allowed their bread to "season" for 24 hours after baking before eating it. No fresh hot bread for them. (They were strict believers in celibacy, also.)

I've noticed that hot bread offers more of the fresh wheat flavor, besides very pleasurable warm texture and softness, but cooled bread allows you to taste more of the quality of the fermentation in the bread.

I've never had a stomach ache just from eating hot bread. Tossing a bunch of hot loaves in the middle of a table, surrounded by friends, and eating half a loaf immediately, slathered with butter and jam, as my friends did the same--that's another story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Shakers, according to one source I read, allowed their bread to "season" for 24 hours after baking before eating it. No fresh hot bread for them. (They were strict believers in celibacy, also.)

there's a reason there aren't any more shakers...no hot bread! :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Pastrypastmidnight
      So I tried my hand at croissants for the first time in about 5 years. I used the recipe from the Bouchon Bakery cookbook. Despite the fact that I really struggled rolling them out (the dough was very stiff and resisted rolling), tore the dough layer in small patches quite a bit on the last turn, and probably took too long letting the butter get too warm, I got nice layers on the outside and on the interior and they did shatter nicely on the outside. I did not get that beautiful open honeycomb interior, however. 
       
      I’d love any tips or feedback or advice anyone could offer to do better next time—thanks!
       

    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

    • By Rene_lorraine
      I'm a pastry cook working in NYC. We have a seasonal bread that we do with chickpeas, garlic (fresh and confit) and pecorino. We drain and rinse the chickpeas and it was working for a while but it hasn't been consistent. Bread turns out flat. What is it in chickpeas that kills the yeast and how can we counteract the effect? I'm taking a long shot by posting but wanted to further educate myself and fellow team members. Thanks so much. 
    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By pastrygirl
      If so, what was it like?  Sounds similar to kouign-aman ... https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-44486529
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...