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Colored Cocoa Butter: The Topic


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I was going to stock up on colored cocoa butter for holiday bonbons then remembered I have way too much plain cocoa butter on hand and should use it up, so I think I'm going to make the leap to powder color.  Between Power Flowers, Chef Rubber, and Roxy & Rich, Roxy & Rich are priced best and I've been happy with their already-mixed colors so will probably go with them.  Couple questions for powder color users before I order:

 

Do you find the primary colors (red, blue, yellow) sufficient for mixing all the other colors you might like, or should I go ahead and get purple and green for convenience?

 

How much extra white is needed for opaque colors? 

 

And have we figured out how to make jewel colors - do the dry sparkly powders still sparkle and how large of an airbrush nozzle is needed to spray them?

 

thanks!

 

 

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38 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

I was going to stock up on colored cocoa butter for holiday bonbons then remembered I have way too much plain cocoa butter on hand and should use it up, so I think I'm going to make the leap to powder color.  Between Power Flowers, Chef Rubber, and Roxy & Rich, Roxy & Rich are priced best and I've been happy with their already-mixed colors so will probably go with them.  Couple questions for powder color users before I order:

 

Do you find the primary colors (red, blue, yellow) sufficient for mixing all the other colors you might like, or should I go ahead and get purple and green for convenience?

 

How much extra white is needed for opaque colors? 

 

And have we figured out how to make jewel colors - do the dry sparkly powders still sparkle and how large of an airbrush nozzle is needed to spray them?

 

thanks!

 

 

Hi, I use Roxy & Rich and love their products though I gotta admit, working with their white powder is a pain in the ass. I feel like there's always some micro clumps left so I never use it. I think you can go a long way with red, blue and yellow AND black. if you want pinkish hues, i'd try their pink powder, really vibrant!

To make a colour opaque I think you'll need to add at least 2-3% of colour powder to your cocoa butter. (it depends of the colour)

 

As for the sparkling powder, make sure they're Hybrid Sparkle Dust and not lustre dust. The lustre dusts do not diffuse the light as much and it takes out some of shine, imo.

 

If I add around 0.5 - 1% sparkling powder, I'm able to spray with a 0.5 nozzle.

You'll alway need to back your sparkling powder with at least 2-3% regular colour powder. otherwise the brown of the chocolate will take over like this:

 

 

121092280_395717781441855_5160447918966284126_n.jpg

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Personally, I like to spray or paint a thin coat of somewhat translucent cocoa butter and then spray the sparkling powder (powder form) and then give a super thin coat of cocoa butter to seal the powder.  It gives a really nice finish!

 

 

120972031_784434112347949_5315450535329126450_n.jpg

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@Muscadelle thank you!  I don't use a lot of pink but will def get some black. 

 

Is the first photo CB with only sparkle powder and no additional color?  Do you have the 'snow white' titanium dioxide or the plain white?  https://www.chocolat-chocolat.com/home/c210060/c378157873/c378157875/index.html

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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1 minute ago, pastrygirl said:

@Muscadelle thank you!  I don't use a lot of pink but will def get some black. 

 

Is the photo CB with only sparkle powder and no additional color?  Do you have the 'snow white' titanium dioxide or the plain white?  https://www.chocolat-chocolat.com/home/c210060/c378157873/c378157875/index.html

I have a feeling they're the same colour just different weight (even though they wrote a different name on chocolat-chocolat website) because if you look at the fat soluble powder on Roxy and Rich website, there's only one white. https://www.roxyandrich.com/food-coloring/fat-dispersible-food-colouring

 

Only sparkling gold power, you can see that the result is mehh.

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@MuscadelleSince you seem to have some experience with Roxy and Rich colors, do they have a color wheel or similar guide for mixing different shades using the various color powders they have?  Or is it just experimentation?

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3 hours ago, Bentley said:

@MuscadelleSince you seem to have some experience with Roxy and Rich colors, do they have a color wheel or similar guide for mixing different shades using the various color powders they have?  Or is it just experimentation?


i don’t know if they have one, I simply follow my  instinct 😆

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Following up, I had put in a query to Roxy & Rich, this is their response on creating your own jewel colors:

 

Quote

To create the metallic effect, the best option would be the Pearl Hybrid Lustre Dust (the 8 colours at the bottom with the code that starts with “LP“. These are small enough the be used with an air brush, however the best trick is to use a large tip and to make sure to keep the gun warm at all times to avoid the cocoa butter solidifying in the gun.

 

I ordered their fat soluble colors and a couple of the sparkle dusts (not the pearl), and already have some Chef Rubber pearl powders, will play around.

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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

Following up, I had put in a query to Roxy & Rich, this is their response on creating your own jewel colors:

 

 

I ordered their fat soluble colors and a couple of the sparkle dusts (not the pearl), and already have some Chef Rubber pearl powders, will play around.

Yess, please post your experiments, would love to see the results!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all, SUPER useful thread and glad to see it's still alive after so many years. 1st post form me.

We have been experimenting lately with making our own CB colors with R&R powders - initially lot's of issues with transparency and peak through of the dark chocolate affecting the outcome. But adding TiO2 white powder to the colors seem to have helped a lot. And also adding a back coating of white as needed.

Next will be to add some hybrid sprakles dust and / or lustre powders we just purchased and see if we can recreate this "pearl" effect to the color. Need to make a new batch of Orange color so will try 100g CB + 10g Orange + 2g TiO2 + 1g sparkle super pearl dust and see what happens. The science of chocolate making is interesting to me and my wife is the artist so we are experimenting at this stage. We spray with a 0.5mm nozzle

This is the most recent creation of a mint bonbon with green emerald powder that had some TiO2 added to it so it sort of became a different green after the TiO2 was added. 

Does anyone have recommendations on using the lustre and sparkle dusts? 

 

image000000(3).thumb.jpg.9542d190e6abb76612558b1242dcf00c.jpg

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I am interested in the opacity issue and the use of titanium.  I use Chef Rubber's colors (already mixed).  The Ruby Red lists titanium as an ingredient, but the color is not opaque.  It turns into a muddy red brown when dark or milk chocolate are behind it.  Is one to conclude that Chef Rubber did not intend for it to be opaque, and I am expected to spray a layer of white behind it, or is the issue that more titanium is needed?  Kirsten Tibballs frequently calls for adding "titanium or white chocolate" to make colors opaque but doesn't mention proportions.  Some CR colors similar to red (such as yellow and orange) are closer to opaque, and with those one can make do without the white layer.  I was also interested in discovering last Christmas that, in the case of a transfer sheet from Chocotransfersheets.com containing green foliage and red berries, to my surprise the berries were closer to opaque.  But after much experimentation, I have concluded that if you really want the color to be what it originally is from the bottle, a white layer is required.

 

I am willing to try adding titanium to the CR colors but am not sure where to find it.  Amazon lists some for soap-making.  On a related issue, I know that many people are moving away from using titanium and that there are some manufacturers who are working on cocoa butter colors that don't use it but are opaque, but I'm not sure of the state of that research.

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9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Nice and close to me then 

Nice, just saw your also Ont, CA. Will be nice to meet some day once this Covid time passes.

Anywhere that you source powder colors / bonbon making supplies in the GTA? so far we have been getting it online from Qc stores, we know of signaturefinefoods but hard to get there during the week due to a full time non chocolate related job.

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I am wondering how to get a metallic/gold finish when spraying chocolate showpieces. When I mix gold powder with cocoa butter it looks amazing when melted, but when it crystalizes it seems like the gold disappears leaving a dull brown color. I am looking for a gold finish like Amaury Guichon on his telescope; 

 

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15 hours ago, Jpcaissy said:

Nice, just saw your also Ont, CA. Will be nice to meet some day once this Covid time passes.

Anywhere that you source powder colors / bonbon making supplies in the GTA? so far we have been getting it online from Qc stores, we know of signaturefinefoods but hard to get there during the week due to a full time non chocolate related job.

I get chocolate delivered from Sweet Market Distribution in east Toronto. But I will run to Signature or MVR but my non chocolate job used to give me lots of time mid week pre Covid. I do order a lot from QC - Chocolat-chocolat, occasionally DR.  Haven't needed powdered colour for a while - I have a bunch in the house already and most recently when I make colors I've been using the Power Flowers. 

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On 10/20/2020 at 7:53 AM, Kerry Beal said:

I get chocolate delivered from Sweet Market Distribution in east Toronto. But I will run to Signature or MVR but my non chocolate job used to give me lots of time mid week pre Covid. I do order a lot from QC - Chocolat-chocolat, occasionally DR.  Haven't needed powdered colour for a while - I have a bunch in the house already and most recently when I make colors I've been using the Power Flowers. 

Sweet Market distribution? nerver heard of these guys, do you have a website or contact info for them we would love to check them out. Can't seem to find them via the good old google search!

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4 hours ago, Jpcaissy said:

Sweet Market distribution? nerver heard of these guys, do you have a website or contact info for them we would love to check them out. Can't seem to find them via the good old google search!

Name has changed recently - previously Savourez Fine Foods. 

 

I think I can safely share the e-mail I got 

 

Hello
 
I hope you are all doing well in this unprecedented time in our life.
We are proud to let you know that Savourez fine foods have changed during Covid for the better.
Savourez is now Sweet Market Distribution inc.
Our goal with Sweet Market distribution inc is to give you the best service possible so it will start with next day delivery service. Starting August 4th we will be able to deliver you the same day or next day depending on what time you send your order.
Knowing the situation everyone is in we Covid, we are also working very hard on our side to find the best deals on the market for all the products we are distributing. To reach this goal we are now importing a lot of products directly which will help us to bring you the best prices possible. 
With Savourez we tried to give you a good service, now with Sweet Market Distribution we will give you the best service.
During the Month of August, I will come to see you in order to present you all new products and prices and to organize the coming fall and winter seasons.
 
Here are all contact information Starting August 1rst
 
Laurent : cell 647-248-7526  laurent@sweetmarketdistribution.com
orders : all orders have to be sent to order@sweetmarketdistribution.com
            or call Emily 647-905-8321
 
 
Every order received before 8:30am will be delivered the same day. After 8:30am it will be next day delivery. Our driver will wear a mask and gloves for everyone's safety.
 
Looking forward to working with you under our new flag.
Do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

 

 

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Hi guys, as a follow up to my above post, we made the orange CB this weekend, here is the result product (pumpkin spice flavor in a pumpkin or nipple design- you choose) , I find the 1g of hybrid sparkle dust (mica) did not give add much sparkle to the end product but you see it's in there.

 

PXL_20201026_144923486.thumb.jpg.c63173df638dfe01cae9313daca7ea5e.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

any of you guys ever used the hybrid dust alone to color cocoa butter? How much of that powder ratio wise would need to be used? I need to make copper color. The hybrid dust copper color is a lot more expensive then the normal food colors and only come in 25g containers. 

Is it still the same 10% ratio? Therefore 25g of powder would only yield 250g of copper cocoa butter which then makes no financial sense and I would be better off just buying the already made bottle of copper color?

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Savour school just did a video about this.

 

She uses gold metallic powder mixed with 100% alcohol to spray the mold. Then she sprays a thin layer of cocao butter once the alcohol has evaporated.

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I have a general question for you guys. Is there a minimum waiting time before you pour the chocolate after painting your molds? In fact I'll go ahead and ask: What are the general waiting times in between steps for you. Do you follow a precise guideline? 

 

Personally, I know you have to wait 12 hours for fillings to crystallize and maybe 1 hour before unmolding, but I've never really though about how long I have to wait after painting or how long I have to wait before filling the shells.

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41 minutes ago, Muscadelle said:

I have a general question for you guys. Is there a minimum waiting time before you pour the chocolate after painting your molds? In fact I'll go ahead and ask: What are the general waiting times in between steps for you. Do you follow a precise guideline? 

 

Personally, I know you have to wait 12 hours for fillings to crystallize and maybe 1 hour before unmolding, but I've never really though about how long I have to wait after painting or how long I have to wait before filling the shells.

For me it depends on the room temp. If I remember your comment correctly, you keep a cold room like me (no higher than 20ºC). That means my color is set quickly so by the time I'm done painting/spraying I'm good to go on shelling - 5-10 minutes max.

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