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Found 1,329 results

  1. MikeMac

    Getting the most out of spices.

    Ok I understand their are many ways to extract Flavor from spices. Some spices are best toasted dry some are best steeped in a bit of hot oil some reading I have done talks about fat soluble flavors others are water soluble. Any available reference material on this matter?
  2. Dear All, I'm looking for an alternative to Branson ultrasonic bath. For the moment I've found the JPL Sonic 2200: http://www.jpleurope.co.uk/professional-sonic-cleaners.html Any suggestion for some other brands/models? Thank You in advance, Paolo Michelotti
  3. I have a question-Alinea or Moto? Having trouble deciding. Taking my dad to Chicago in June, he's open to anything foodwise.
  4. Have a creamy vinaigrette recipe in which I'd like to replace an egg yolk. Is liquid soy lecithin the best substitute and if so what is the equivalent amount of LSL per yolk? Thanks.
  5. Anonymous Modernist 1187

    Health Department and cooking technique safety

    I am a small restaurant and wanted to try something new to my town, specifically cooking a steak sous vide, freezing it in liquid nitrogen, then deep frying it. However, my health department won't allow me to to keep the steak in at 131 degrees for more than 4 hours. My local inspector wrote the following: unless scientifically proven to be effective in preventing the growth of foodborne pathogens (lab testing). Those test results would have to be provided to our office for review and written approval. Thanks. I have not yet purchased the book....saving up for it, can someone send me in the correct direction for this, if it is contained in the book then please let me know, but I can't afford lab testing myself. Thanks a million Chris
  6. I'm planning on purchasing a Sous Vide Professional in the next month. Before Christmas Williams-Sonoma had a great sale price, around $600, but now everyone seems to be charging the same as Polyscience does on their site, $800. Has anyone found a better current price out there?
  7. Love the new book, but somewhat overwhelming. Looking to hear from others what they have cooked up so far that they really love. Especially those that do not require out of the ordinary equipment. Thanks in advance. Gary
  8. Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers? In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria. Ingredients All your meat leftovers Onion (compulsory) Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini) Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne) Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry) Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche) Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)' vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil) Mise en place cut your meat in small cubes or slices cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting) cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove Cooking in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end. in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3) in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1 Serving You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy. Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
  9. Borrowing a page from Modernist Cuisine, I put 500ml of whole milk and 70 grams cocoa nibs in an ISI container with two charges of NO2. Eight to twelve hours later I strained. The milk is white with a grains of cocoa (which fall out on their own), but tastes strongly of chocolate -- it's white chocolate milk. As a drink, with sweetener it's delicious. But baking with it the flavour evaporates. Why, and does anyone have a suggestion on how to keep the chocolate flavour? To be more specific, I used the white chocolate milk in place of milk in drop cookies and white cake batter. In the batter the flavour is noticeable, after baking, it's gone. Baking times were between 10 and 40 minutes. The only thing I can think to do is try the experiment again with heavy cream and see if the fat preserves the flavour. Any thoughts on this?
  10. Anonymous Modernist 17713

    Rib eye from specific retailer overcooked sous vide

    I've been cooking rib eye steaks sous vide for a few months now and for some reason whenever I buy rib eye from Trader Joe's, the meat comes out far more done looking than rib eye steaks cooked at the same temperature (133F) as steaks from other retailers, ranging from butcher shops to Safeway. It's extremely perplexing to me as it's the same cut of meat, and I'm finding it hard to believe that 133F would overcook a normal steak. I'm using an electric deep fryer at 375F for 2 minutes to get the final sear after sticking the steak in the freezer for 30 min.
  11. Anonymous Modernist 847

    Aluminum Foil

    I have always wondered if it makes a difference what side of the foil one uses when roasting/baking/braising in an oven. I would assume that having the shinier side face down (facing the food) would reflect the heat onto the food better and create a more stable cooking environment. Thoughts?
  12. southern girl

    Keller To Lv

    I arrived home to a message from a local foodie insider...Thomas Keller will be opening a restaurant here in Las Vegas in the Venetian in April. I don't have any details yet...but will be at a Beard dinner here Monday night (and am sitting with some other restaunateurs from the Venetian)...I am sure that will be a topic of conversation!
  13. Anonymous Modernist 3207

    Game Meat and Mushiness in Sous Vide

    I have been flipping through the book looking for a discussion and understanding of the issue with low temp game cookery and the science behind the issues. I use a fair amount of both farmed and wild game meat (including some rather odd ones) and have been both disappointed and amazed with the results, but never sure how and why, and more importantly how to replicate them. I made a balontine of rabbit for a our menu recently and poached it sous vide. I cooked it to 60 degrees in a 64 degree bath and it was perfect. I cooked the same one the next week with fresher rabbits to 60 degrees in a 60 degree bath to pasturize and all the loin meat went mushy. I have also had this happen with lamb leg (not sure if it was just a bit to old or the acidic marinade did it but 24 hours later it was trash.
  14. I am trying to make a reverse spherification using a recipe (http://www.molecularmixology.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=26) that utilizes calcium lactate. I don't have calcium lactate but I do have Texturas Gluco (calcium gluconate and calcium lactate). Can I substitute the Gluco for the calcium lactate? What ratio should I use? Thank you! wayne314
  15. Hi All, I'm new to the site and new to incorporating modernist techniques and ingredients into my culinary repertoire, but I like to think that I've cooked food in every other conceivable way short of a fusion reactor. When purchasing chemicals such as carrageenan, calcium chloride, sodium acetate, etc., what sort of shelf life should I expect? I'm reticent to purchase large amounts if they aren't well suited for storage, but I also don't want to purchase very small quantities if it isn't necessary for quality control. I know there are so many other "molecular" additives I've omitted from my example, but a rough generalization would be very helpful. Thanks very much.
  16. Pierogi

    Jose Andres on PBS

    The post about Jose Andres appearing on Conan O'Brien's show sparked my rapidly fading memory button, and I remembered that I wanted to post this last weekend as a head's up ! PBS, at least in the Los Angeles market, is running a new cooking series with Jose Andres called "Made in Spain". The first show was run last Saturday, on two of the four stations in the market. It was quite excellent. I fell in love with Jose Andres when he was on Mark Bittman's show about Spain. He's a natural in front of a camera, and very charming. If the first episode is representative of the quality of the rest of the series, it should be a fun ride.
  17. Anonymous Modernist 18203

    [Modernist Cuisine at Home] Microwave

    I just bought the "home edition" and read it with interest. Particularly the microwave section. It explains it all, but I never did much with mine but melt chocolate. I am a caterer and do my bit of cooking but never enjoyed my micro to do it. Why I don't know. I also take nutrition classes and comments on microwaves are such: The micro destroys all nutrients. The micros are banned in Russia. The plastics are dangerous (I know this has been explained here and I am just quoting here what's floating around). And obviously cooking in a micro per se has not caught on or else there would be far more generally published recipes as there are. So, my question is where do I find objective research on microwaves?
  18. morda

    In search of Blais...

    Hi everyone... So I missed Blais at Blais, and I guess I've missed Blais at Bazzaar. Anyone know what he's up to at the moment? Or is there anything else in Atlanta at the moment that is Not-to-be-missed? I have a night or two in Atlanta next week and I'd like to do some culinary exploration. I'm also interested in some inexpensive places for our other meals (2 lunches and a dinner), so any suggestions are appreciated. I think we may be staying in the Buckhead area, if that makes a difference. TIA, morda Edited because it's spelled Bazzaar and not Blazaar
  19. Sharp has introduced several models of consumer counter-top steam ovens that combine pure steam (low temperature and high temperature) with microwave and convection capabilities. They also have a feature called "super steam" where they claim steam temperatures aboe 100C (upto 300C). Examples include AX1200, AX1300 and AX1500 available in different countries. In addition there is a considerably cheaper AX1100 model that has pure steam and microwave without the said "super steam" capability. The super steam feature (except in AX1100) is supposed to enable steam frying of French fries and other items. Any experience with these
  20. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/sfgate/indexn?blogid=26 An interesting article in the SF Chronicle. The question of legality vs. ethics continues. Not quite the same as what happened at Interlude in Melbourne, however it makes me wonder if the chef is passing off other's writing as his own, what's going on in the kitchen?
  21. Anonymous Modernist 2308

    Errata in the 2nd printing

    I just had a look at the errata page and noticed that it was dated April 26, 2011.Are there plans for similar list for the second printing? I assume that while most of the errors on the list will have been corrected (I haven't checked yet), some new ones might have crept in?
  22. Wolfville

    Clermont-Ferrand

    This is my first post! My husband and I are travelling to France from Canada for the first time in November. Our best friends have just moved to Clermont-Ferrand (he works for Michelin). I have found one post recommending a restaurant in Clermont - are there others? All four of us consider fine dining and wine our only leisure pursuit! Unique cuisine, an guided wine list and exceptional service make the experience for us. Looking forward to seeking more advice as we plan our trip. Cheers!
  23. I've just noticed a new show to FoodTV Canada. Heston Blumenthal's "In Search of Perfection" from the BBC. In this episode he is taking Black Forest Gateau and creating the molecular gastronomy equivalent. Right now he has taken melted chocolate, aerated it with a cream siphon then put it in a vacuum chamber and evacuated it to create large bubbles in the chocolate. He then figured out how to do it at home with a vacuum cleaner. I think I'm going to enjoy watching this show. Here is a link to a topic about the show.
  24. Anonymous Modernist 738

    Infrared/Catalytic Char-broilers

    In MC, I wassurprisedto see the only mention of catalytic technique inchar-broilersas: "(charcoal) radiates heat with an intensity much greater than can be mustered by all but a few exotic catalytic gas grills." p.2-10, ...especially considering a main focus of the book is on 'exotic' methods and modern equipment! Does anyone have a review of current commercial grade catalytic charbroilers? TEC has even produced them domestically in South Carolina since 2006, and recently sold the technology to ITW/Vulcan -so we may see a new line out of Vulcan soon. I've been looking into the Rankin Delux TurboBroiler TB-3 or TB-8 series, and the TEC Searmaster II specifically. Any other brand name review and model is welcomed as well, those are the two i have found most interesting, reasonably priced, and available. Charcoal is a difficult proposition in my commercial kitchen, and indoors in general. I would like to hear from anyone who has experience with this type of charbroiler. It becomes difficult at first to give credibility to these devices when claims of "searing in juices" and juice meters are plastered all over theiradvertising, however I would also like to see if anyone has discussion on the different effects of dehydration that wouldoccurbetween this type, gas burner with radiant element/lava rock, and charcoal charbroiler. with the radiant catalytic element type, there is significantly less convection around the product being cooked -which keeps me interested in them. Does anyone have any relevant input?
  25. Sorry if i've missed this somewhere, but was wondering if anyone was going to this event? Store Event Where: Washington, DC Event: An evening with Thomas Keller Date: 11/17/04 Time: 7pm-9pm Cost: $35.00/person Contact: (202) 237-0375 Details: Join America's Top Chef, Thomas Keller, owner of The French Laundry in Yountville, Bouchon in Yountville, and Per Se in New York City for a reception and book signing to benefit the National Capitol Chapter of the American Institute of Wine and Food. Thomas will be joined by Bouchon’s executive chef, Jeff Cerciello, to discuss classic bistro dishes from their new book, Bouchon. Chef Jeff Heineman of the Grapeseed American Bistro and Wine Bar will prepare the evening’s food; wine will be provided by Michel-Schlumberger. Book signings are limited to books purchased at Sur La Table. Please bring your receipt for books purchased prior to the event. Ticket sales will benefit the AIWF.
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