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  1. I bought a yogurt maker via Amazon the other day -- a cheap Salton jobbie that's really nothing but a warm womb to keep the mixture at temperature. (Many years ago, I wrapped the mixture in a bath towel and placed it on a steam radiator, but I'm lazier now than I was as a novice cook.) I spent the twenty bucks on the machine because I was cross at the price of yog, and the process has always seemed like magic to me. So: I can make a quart of yogurt a day, no sweat. But what to do with it, beyond the crunchy breakfasts, the tandoories, the cheese (love that!) the Jacques Pepin cake? The dips, the salad dressings, etc. It's good, it's easy, it's versatile, it's cheap. Care to share how you cook with yog?
  2. Has anyone ordered from this place (www.lepicerie.com)? I'm just curious how your experience was. Honestly, I thought maybe the man I dealt with was having a bad day, until I had to speak with him again in regard to my order. I had ordered a few items that you can't find everywhere (ie: trimoline...atomized glucose...). Not only did I NOT receive everything I ordered, the stuff I did get was shipped late. When I called to let them know the order had an item missing the manager accused me of trying to get the item for free and proceeded to insult me! Turns out this is a horrible company, with horrible customer service. I would not recommend them to anyone, but I am curious if anyone else has had issues with them.
  3. Has anyone used Walter's latest baking book and do you have an opinion on whether it is worth adding to an already extensive baking collection? Particularly interested in the yeasted bread sections--danish, etc. Thanks.
  4. Does anyone know the status of Trotter's new books that were suppose to come out last fall? I believe one was called: "Lessons in Wine Service" and the other was a wholesale re-write of his original cookbook.
  5. I received this book for christmas, having made some hints before. It is a monster book in coffe table format documenting the dishes in his three star flagship resturant in Royal Hospital Road, London. This is not "Gordon cooks at home" or something similar. This is a hardcore book that presents and explain the actual dishes served at the resturant. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Recipes-Star-Chef-...99651590&sr=8-3 (Note to editor: please feel free to eGullet-ize the link and/or add link to US Amazon) It only costs GBP 20, which is amazingly low considering the production values. The first half of the book is just photos of the various dishes and comments about them from (presumably) the man himself. The second half is the actual recipes. The presentation/photos of the dishes are absolutely stunning. Many of the dishes looks like work of art, especially in the pastry/desserts section. The recipes (at least some of them) actually looks doable, surprisingly enough. Only a very foolish or very experienced amateur cook would attempt to recreate an entire menu in a home kitchen, but borrowing a single dish (especially a main course) is definitely doable if you have reasonable experience and some time to devote. The recipes are very well written and some though has definitely gone into making them possible to execute in a home kitchen (no sous vide machinery...). My usual approach when attempting fine dining cooking is to simplify, like pair the protein and sauce in one dish with the (simpler) starch from somewhere else and/or remove some of the garnishes. This would work well with this book. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in fine dining. Either just as a documentation of dishes from one of the worlds top resturants or to actually try to cook from. Yesterdays Financial Times had an article where one of their writers tried to execute an entire three course menu from the book. To summarize, the main course was on the table three hours late, but the results were stunning. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2d21f2b0-ba6b-11...?nclick_check=1 Note: I haven't yet tried any of the recipes (but I'm definitely eyeing that foie gras filled pidgeon breast roulade with confited pigeon legs...) and I like fine dining cook books, mostly for inspiration, sometimes for actual cooking.
  6. I am looking to compile a list of dessert books that have their recipes written in metric. I am sick of converting from "housewife" measurements, and I know that metric recipes are more likely to turn out as the author intended.
  7. I'm interested in collecting books that feature good recipes for home style dishes from around the world. I have a fairly extensive collection, ranging from fairly broad Eastern European and South American books to region-specific titles such as The Illustrated Cape Malay Cookbook and Catalan Cuisine. I'm missing some, tho', and I'm looking for recommendations to fill the gaps. I'd like recommendations for ... Nordic (I have Noma, of course, but I'm after the sort of food normal people cook at home and traditional dishes) Hawaii and other Pacific islands Caribbean (all I can find at the moment are the Levi Roots books--and I'm not sure if a series of books by a very rich musician with a side line in hot sauce is what I'm after) African (I have a few African books, actually, mostly South African, and most of them are shit) Polish Indigenous Australian Irish (looking at the Coleman Andrews one at the moment--thoughts?) US--beyond New Orleans/Cajun/Creole (already have a couple of good books on that), ideally including something about the Texan/Mexican border area Mongolian Arab (think Saudi Arabia/Kuwait/Yemen as opposed to Lebanon/Syria/Israel) Croat/Serb/Bosnian Belgian Dutch Chinese Islamic Macanese
  8. The eminent cookbook author Bernard Clayton Jr. passed away recently. From the NY Times' obituary, Clayton's Complete Book of Breads was probably one of the first "bread" books I owned. It's practically encyclopedic. As are his Complete Book of Pastry and Complete Book of Soups and Stews. Well, at least encyclopedic for their respective times. Maybe not the first books I turn to now for technique, but always good for an inspiration or two. Do you have any of his books on your shelves?
  9. Some context to get us started. We have Society member Nathan Myhrvold's epic Modernist Cuisine, which may well change the terrain of cooking as we know it. It's being self-published and costs more than a flight to Paris. (Mine's on order.) We have Society member Dorie Greenspan's Around My French Table. The genius behind several baking books reports that she still can't use weight in her recipes, just US volume. Four of the Amazon top ten cookbooks are diet books, one is about something called "cake pops," and Rocco DiSpirito sits in the top spot telling us to Now Eat This -- "this" being "America's Favorite Comfort Foods, All Under 350 Calories." (The cover features a cheeseburger and some mac & cheese -- at least, I think that "cheese" is the correct term....) What can we make of this and other cookbook publishing phenomena as we head into the end of 2010 and the big buying season? What other data points should we be using? Are you hopeful? Depressed? Jaded?
  10. What is the worst cookbook you have ever seen? Bonus points for example recipes... My nomination is the Blendtec Lifestyles Recipe Book: More than 300 delicious recipes made with one incredible machine (it came with the blender). A few example recipes... Please tell me this one is a joke. "Ice Cream" made with flavored non-dairy creamer? This is also an "ice cream" but apparently they didn't think Tang™ would appreciate the product placement. Have you ever read a normal pancakes recipe? You know, the ones that say "mix until just combined. Do not overmix!"? Then, there is this one. "Put it all in a blender an press 'destroy'."
  11. I'm surprised no-one has started a thread on this as yet, so here goes. There is a very new web site (so new it's still in Beta) that you can enter your cookbooks into to create an on-line bookshelf. This is the slow and tedious part of the process (particularly if you have as many cookbooks as I do). What comes next is the neat part. A lot of books have been indexed, with all the recipes and their respective ingredients. Want to search through your books for a recipe using lobster and vanilla? Enter the ingredients into the advanced search engine and up pops all of the recipes from indexed books in your own library that contain these two ingredients. They also give the rest of the ingredients and allow you to add these to your shopping list, which is categorised by type of produce so you can order your shopping around the store. I'm not sure how many books have been indexed so far and not all of my books were on there but I do know that from today I have indexed 176 cookbooks and can search through 12,022 recipes. No more simply going to old standby cookbooks. I'm sure I'll get more use out of my library as a cooking resource using this website. The web site is called eat your books. At present the site is in beta but is accepting subscriptions (current price is $25 per annum or $50 as a limited offer for lifetime membership). It's an idea that I wish I'd thought of but am really pleased to be able to use.
  12. Hi guys, I read about some bakers (most notably Japanese ones) who don't use additives in their baking. I have heard of cases where baking soda, baking powder, gelatin and artificial flavorings are avoided. Just want to know what you guys think about it and whether it is something which is commonly practiced by other pastry chefs.
  13. I'm been interested in Latin American cooking lately. This has been prompted by watching Rick Bayless and enjoying a variety of really good food from the street food scene. I want to pick up several solid cookbooks and maybe some good books about ingredients. I'm more interested in traditional recipes/cooking methods. I'm a pretty good cook but I am new to cooking this type of food at home. I like to have books that include the following: *Cooking meats like al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, etc. *Soups and stews *Different types moles, salsas and other sauces *Empanadas *Pupusas *Tamales - love to learn the different types *Alfajores Thanks!
  14. My chef posted on CIA's allumni site to see if anyone had an extra copy, but I will try here as well. It should look like a spiral-bound stack of papers, but I am looking for a copy of this. After several discussions of knife shapening techniques and philosophies I am intrigued to read this. If anyone can help, thank you in advance.
  15. I would like to begin Vietnamese cooking- I would like titles of good cookbooks, etc.
  16. Hello all- Is anyone aware of an online nutrition calculator that home cooks can use? I would like to enter all of my ingredients and get the nutrition information for the dish I am cooking. More importantly, I would like to be able to play with the amounts of ingredients in order to serve a healthier dish. For example, cutting the butter in 1/2 for sauteing onions may make a minimal change in taste, but a substantial change in calories. It could mean the difference between someone being able to have a serving of something they really miss or not. Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
  17. Good Meat by Deborah Krasner caught my eye this morning and so I looked thru it. It looks great and has my interest but before I shell out $40, I thought I'd see if anybody has an opinion.
  18. So, I've got a boatload of cookbooks. Some I cook from, some I cook with, some I read, some I don't. What cookbooks do you have that you won't be using as recipe guides, but that you like to read and/or look at the pictures? I'll start with a newer addition to my collection: NOMA Time and Place in Nordic Cuisine. It's a stunning book, but I think I might have trouble finding many of the ingredients being used.
  19. I'd like a copy of Apicius. I'd like an English translation and I'd prefer--really prefer--it to have no substitutes for ingredients. Or, if it does include substitutes, to also mention what the original ingredient was. I've looked at a couple of online versions and found it doesn't tell you what the original item was. What's the best and most reliable hardcopy translation?
  20. Raw Tuscan Kale Salad with Chiles and Pecorino p.63 I found myself a few minutes from the Farmer's Market that was sure to have Tuscan Kale so I decided to take the plunge. The kale ($1.50) was lovely. The recipe calls for the dressing to be made separately in a bowl but I made it directly in the large bowl I was going to toss the kale in so as not to lose any bits and to even further simplify things. I did not have pecorino so I did sub a nutty asiago. After letting it rest the requisite initial 5 minutes I sampled directly from the bowl. Verdict: really good - I could have put a serious dent in the huge bowl but I wanted to give it some more resting time. An hour later I sampled again and realized that the cold had muted the flavors. After letting it come to room temp, it was even better for its rest. The recipe calls for the salad to be served with toasted bread crumbs, preferably from whole wheat or rye. I had no bread in the house, so taking a cue from her raw brussels sprouts variation I toasted a few walnuts, smashed them with my handy kitchen brick, and tossed them over for an experiment. They were mildly interesting but I preferred the simpler form. I might try it next time with the bread crumbs, or using pecorino versus the asiago, but I really like it as is.
  21. The Country Cooking of Ireland was named Cookbook of the Year by The James Beard Foundation. I have not heard of this book and have found no mention of it on this site. I was wondering who has it and your thoughts about it. Dan
  22. It's All American Food I just ordered this from Amazon. Looks like an older book, out of print. Is anyone familiar with it? Here is some of the book on GOOGLE Book Search I enjoy Rosengarten's "goofy prose" (to quote a review) and wish Taste were on again Anyway, for $5 how bad can it be? ETA: links/clarification
  23. A friend and I found a fabulous wine shop yesterday, and she kept saying, "This one is supposed to be quite good," while we were checking out the wines. I finally asked her, "How do you know?" and she replied, "It was in my comic book." In Japan, where I am, there is a manga called "Kami no Shizuku" aka "Drops of God" and it's all about wine. Always wanting to learn more about wine (because I know nothing), I'm looking for an English version. I know it has been translated into Korean, but I have not yet found any info on an English version. Do you oenophiles think there might be a market for a comic about wine? I think there might be a bit of a snob appeal to wine in the English-speaking world that might preclude an English-version of a wine comic book, but I'm hopeful for a translation of the original. And if I can't find one, I guess it's a good reason for me to practise reading Japanese... By the way, at this wine shop a '03 (I think) bottle of Stag's Leap (I can't remember the grape) was going for Y25000 (just over US$200)...or maybe it was Y32000 (about US$270). Edited to add: if you're interested in seeing what the comic looks like, this blog is a diary of the wines mentioned in the comic. Scroll down for pics of some of the covers. (the site is in Japanese) You can also see pictures of the wines, if you're interested.
  24. I came across this list of cookbook shops on the web: Cookboook shops around the world I don't know how comprehensive it is, or whether it is completely out of date. For example, I'm Canadian, and I know it is missing at least 2 Canadian cookbook shops. But, I've never seen such a list before, so I thought I'd share. If anyone can contribute additions or deletions to the list, please do. Here's a couple of Canadian ones they missed: Montreal Cookbook store Vancouver Cookbook Store Cheers, Geoff Ruby
  25. Hi all, I've just started teaching a friend how to cook (my first long-term student!) for the specific purpose of altering her diet so that she can lose a fairly substantial amount of weight (she is also starting an exercise plan). I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on a cookbook at beginner level that features mainly healthy, quick recipes that tend to feature lean proteins, lots of fiber and veggies, whole grains, no processed foods, and very little refined sugar or flour (this is my approach to maintaining my weight, and I'm hoping it will work for her--a self-described sugar and pasta addict). She does not want to spend a ton of time cooking or cleaning up lots of pots and pans, so I'm hoping for something that features a number of "one pan" type meals. Her typical dinner consists of turkey hot dogs and boxed mac 'n' cheese, and I don't want to leap too far, too fast from this (I figure, baby steps...we've committed a year to the weight loss goal). Tonight I taught her how to cook mustard baked catfish, rice pilaf, and sautéed swiss chard dressed with a balsamic vinaigrette (a veggie she had never eaten before and liked--in fact she loved the whole meal, and it was all completed in 40 minutes which should've been 30, but I was talking a lot and trying to teach about timing and knife skills and the like). Despite my enormous cookbook collection, I don't really have much in the way of basic besides Joy of Cooking, How to Cook Everything, and an old Betty Crocker (this last one certainly does not fit the bill). I tend toward very specialized and/or advanced tomes. I'd appreciate any suggestions on her behalf! PS--she does not often eat pork or beef, preferring chicken, turkey, and fish.
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