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Found 957 results

  1. I'm asked about this all the time. I mean ALL the time by English and French speakers. (As if I'm reading Julia Childs or something. ) I have no idea what to recommend. I understand that English is lingua franca here, but I also need some French language books. Help!
  2. Greetings, I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly.
  3. I got Food52 Genius Recipes a couple weeks ago, and this is the first thing I've cooked from the print version... Marie-Hélène’s Apple Cake Dorie Greenspan Available here I think this recipe actually appears in Around my French Table, too. It's an excellent apple cake, particularly interesting in that it doesn't have any spices in it. It is dense with apples, with just enough cake batter to hold everything together. Aesthetically it's a challenge to slice when it's warm, so I suggest letting it cool, then slicing, then reheating if you want it warm.
  4. Slate article Marvelous article on the history leading up to today and describing some of the ways in which Gourmet Magazine has evolved. What a great read! And the cookbook is something I will definitely look at with an eye toward purchasing!
  5. The Dec. 20 edition of Hanamaru Market (Japanese only) featured vacuum cooking with a rice cooker with a keep warm function. I think I'll try this method to make roast beef as one of New Year dishes (osechi) and report on the outcome. In the meantime, anyone interested is encouraged to try this method before I do. The following are rough translations of two of the recipes presented in the TV show: 1. The simplest recipe: Ingredients: 200 g chicken Salt and pepper 1. Rinse chicken with water (or with sake (Japanese rice wine) to get rid of the smell). 2. Drain and cut into manageable chunks, then season with salt and pepper. 3. Put them in a Ziploc bag, put a straw in, and seal the bag. Suck air out of the bag. Remove the straw, taking care not to let air in, and seal the bag. 4. Put 2 cups (i.e., 400 cc) of hot water of 60 to 70 degrees centigrade (140 to 158 deg. Fahrenheit) in the rice cooker and put the bag in. 5. Put the lid on, press the keep warm button to heat for 50 minutes. 2. Roast beef Ingredients for 2 servings 200 g beef Black pepper Salt 1/2 clove garlic 1. Sprinkle salt and pepper on beef. 2. Put the beef in a Ziploc bag and add garlic. 3. Suck air out with a straw. 4. Put water of 60 to 70 degrees centigrade in the rice cooker, put the bag, and press the keep warm button. 5) Leave it for 40 to 50 minutes.
  6. Monica, Any suggestions on how I should work with your book? What do you think is best way of reading it, cooking with it? Do you have favorite recipes?
  7. Forget about which Food TV personality you are! This, I think, takes the (colored with saffron and stuffed with honey and dried figs) cake for cooking-related quizzes. I give you: Which Medieval or Renaissance Cookbook Are You? Me, I'm Platina's De Honesta Voluptate. Well, at least it's in Latin...
  8. and where should i store an opened bottle?
  9. I've been wanting this book for awhile, but I thought I'd ask if anyone has had any experiences (good or bad) with these recipes. The desserts look extraordinary, and I'm looking for book with desserts for special occassions.
  10. Thomas Keller's Bouchon just arrived in the mail after 4 weeks delay from Jessica's Biscuits. I'll be cooking from it over the next couple of weeks. Anyone out there care to trade notes on successes and failures? Leek and Potato soup tonight.
  11. First a little explanation... I keep all of my recipes in Word files. These are in a plain, utilitarian format. From time to time, I will print them out and put them in a plastic sleeve in a utilitarian 3-ring binder. That is handy, because I can remove the page and pin it with a magnet to some convenient place in the kitchen while I am cooking. Now to my problem... For Christmas, the kids are requesting such a thing for a gift. I really don't want to give them something entirely as bare bones as what I have. They do want a binder with the plastic sleeves. I have said that is probably more practical that I send them a CD from time to time because I update them regularly. Nope. They want a book. I have searched the Microsoft site for templates and find none for recipes. I may have to "upgrade" my Word skills to come up with a classy template, uh... geese with blue bows and grapevines need not apply. But, where do you find attractive binders? I know there is a world out there that is into scrapbooking and maybe that is a source for something interesting. I just don't know about it. Have any of you ever done something like this? Any ideas? Thanks... Frantic Mother
  12. Do any of you have the following Susan Purdy books: "Have Your Cake And Eat it Too," "Let Them Eat Cake," and "Perfect Cake" (used to be "Piece Of Cake.")? I'm thinking of ordering them, but would like your feedback. Thanks.
  13. I posted a similar request in the cooking section and thought I'd ask here as well. I'm looking for the ultimate, most complete, comprehensive and authentic cookbook for Indian cuisine to add to my library. What do you recommend? Thanks for your comments.
  14. I've noticed some really good deals via Amazon, Jessica Books, etc. I've been ordering things thru my friend in Seattle and he brings them to me so I can save on shipping and handling fees. I've not had it sent to my Vancouver address because I believe there are hidden costs. Has anyone ordered anything from the states? What were you charged as far as duty, taxes, etc? If I'm only saving a couple of dollars thru my friend, then I'll not trouble him and have it sent directly to me. BTW, books in Vancouver are so much more expensive...even if you have a Chapters card!
  15. I guess Suneeta has been working on her cookbook for upwards of 20 years. It is out now. I've done a bunch of recipes from it, and I know many of them from her cooking classes here in Houston. The book is excellent. I love the way the book is laid out, it is designed to make following the recipes fast and easy. There are three columns for each recipe, the left column has the measures listed in English units, the center column lists the ingredients, and the right column has the measures listed in metric units. The cooking instructions are excellent. The headnotes consist of information on the dish and tips for the dish. This is a cookbook by a teacher who knows how to put a recipe together. Here's the beauty of the book, by way of example. How many times have you seen a cookbook recipe that calls for, say, "1 onion chopped"? What size onion would that be, exactly? Here in Texas an onion can be pretty bid. In Europe, they aren't as big. What Suneeta has done is demystify the list of ingredients by using measures of cups, teaspoons, and tablespoons, or, metric weights. This is awesome! It makes the recipes foolproof. And it gives you a baseline for later changing the recipe up to suit personal tastes. I own 5 Indian cookbooks, and I have read quite a few more. But this is the one that I will default to. This book should be in every cook's collection. It is that good. I would recommend starting with the following: Chicken in Cashew Saffron Gravy North Indian Lamb Curry on Bread Whole Baked Masala Cauliflower Bell Peppers with Roasted Chickpea Flour Dhokla (a fast and easy recipe using cream of wheat that produces beautiful results) Split Yellow Peas with Tamarind Chutney Gena's Kababs (flavored with green onions, ginger, cilantro, crisp fried onions)
  16. A common request is to suggest a Indian cookbook. This compilation of links has most of the discussion which has happened on this topic. http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=41944 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=38550 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=40426 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=40158 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=35639 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=29928 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=34831 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=13852 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=28196 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=23402 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=9910 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=11649
  17. Elie Nassar (aka our own FoodMan) follows Walsh from Paris, France to Paris, Texas in pursuit of authentic food and the real history of "the ugly duckling of American regional cuisines." * * * Be sure to check The Daily Gullet home page daily for new articles (most every weekday), hot topics, site announcements, and more.
  18. It might seem ironic that with my current signature evangalizing the Meat book i would want to solicit the feedback on any interesting vegetarian ones. But it fact, the Meat book was one of the reasons for me to seriously reconsider my diet, in terms of meat sources and other related issues. Now, i still want to make delicious and interesting dishes, so here is my current list of books that live up to the idea: A Passion for Vegetables by Paul Gayler, a gem. Cafe Paradiso Seasons, delight to read: have yet to cook from it but recipes sound so good. The Gate Vegetarian Cookbook: Where Asia Meets the Mediterranean: i expected more from it considering a very favorable review in UK Telegraph, but i need more time to make sure. Vegetables by Guy Martin: breathtaking photography by Isabelle Rozenbaum, she worked on several book with Martin - i wish they were published in english, and in french they're damn expensive. Of course, Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is always used as a source for ideas. Honorary mention - Schneider's Vegetables Amaranth to Zucchini.
  19. Perusing the international cookbooks at my local Barnes & Noble today and what did I spy but the new cookbook by our own Suvir Saran, "Indian Home Cooking"! So of course I picked up a copy. It appears to be chock full of excellent and very approachable recipes, as well as Suvir's terrific notes and comments regarding his remembrances of each dish. Although I couldn't resist bringing it home from the B&N, I did check to see if it's available on Amazon through the eGullet link. It is, of course, and ten bucks cheaper. Congratulations, Suvir. Well done. I know you're proud and you should be.
  20. Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook: Stategies, Recipes, and Techniques of Classic Bistro Cooking.
  21. I'm a pretty good home baker (both sweets and breads) and I'm seriously considering going to culinary school. I'd like to go through an entire pastry book on my own before I apply though because it's a big decision (big job change for me!). My question is this - if I could choose between the following 3 books (I'm in the limiting goodcook.com club), which one would be best for learning classic French techniques? Lots of pictures would be a huge plus. - Professional Baking, 3rd Edition by Wayne Gisslen (I read in a previous thread that somebody didn't like this book, but I also heard good things too) - The Professional Pastry Chef, 4th edition by Bo Friberg - Sweet Miniatures by Flo Braker (not sure if this is a "teaching" book) Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!!
  22. I'm looking for recommendations for the best (and also the healthiest) cookbooks which are based on the cuisine of Alsace. Any advice please?
  23. My sister just discovered cooking last week. So far she has made stir fry and tried her own tomato sauce, which she burned. She has announced to our family that I am allowed to buy her one cookbook for Channukah and that is it. My question is, which book should it be? I am looking for a basic cookbook and am leaning towards Joy of Cooking. She needs a book that has the basics, like how to cook a potato, but has room to expand, should she feel so inclined. Thoughts, suggestions?
  24. at one point i heard of a liquor shot recipe that used as one of its ingredients man-seed. i think you know what i am talking about. do you have any what this recip eis?
  25. Does anyone have any recommendations or favorites from this book? It's a seriously huge book, and I'm a little perplexed trying to figure out what to try first. It's checked out through the 23rd, so it's got two weeks to convince me to buy it.
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