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sagestrat

Rabbit

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Do your recipes have to be original? If not, there's a great braised rabbit dish in the first Inn at Little Washington cookbook. The key to keeping the rabbit moist was to remove the loins and cook them seperately: Basically, the thighs and saddle were braised in apple cider. The loins were given a quick sear, then finished in a hot oven until just done.

You could do a another braise using a similar method with the loins in what I like to call puttanesca ingredients: pitted black olives, tomatoes, onions and capers. (I'd leave out the olives and capers until about 15-20 minutes prior to completion.) Garnish with a little flat leaf parley.

Good luck and let us know how things turn out!

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Whenever I braise rabbit, I add cream to the braising liquid. The fat in the cream helps keep the meat more moist than it would be otherwise. Other things I have done are curing and then poaching in clarified butter or duck fat.

Good luck!

TA


Tonyy13

Owner, Big Wheel Provisions

tony_adams@mac.com

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I just wanted to add that I've re-read the rabbit article in AoE because a customer of mine came in yesterday to sell me some of her rabbit meat. (Universes aligning)

Because of the article I now know that the Silver Fox breed was the favorite in a tasting by Tami Lax on behalf of Slow Food. I also know that older rabbits are better tasting and have better texture. Rabbit stock is apparently increcible and requires very little seasoning.

Now I'm armed with useful info to talk to my new supplier of rabbit!

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I recently bought a whole (gutted) rabbit from Burrough Market in London and prepared it and cooked it - it was yum! I thought you might all like to see some photographs.

1. The shopping. All of this food was bought at Borough Market in London. It is all fresh from English farms. Yum yum. There is enough here to feed 3 of us for 1 week at £60.

shopping.jpg

2. The rabbit up close.

holding_up_rabbit.jpg

3. The rabbit skinned

ready_to_cook.jpg

4. The rabbit cooking

rabbit_cooking.jpg

5. Potatoes a la Lyonnaise to go with the rabbit

potatoes.jpg

6. French beans to go with the rabbit

beans.jpg

The rabbit was cooked in red wine, and port, with onions, fresh herbs, and pancetta (which you can see in the first photo).

It was yum! I will definitely be doing it again. Oh - and the rabbit only cost £4.


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Gorgeous photos.. Thanks for posting that.. Yeah, nothing scary about rabbit.. I have never gotten mine with the fur on.. I am assuming fur on helped with the price.. You should try making a terrine.

I have a question, in terms of butchering the rabbit, were you made aware of the glands on the back legs.. Rabbits use this glands to spray territory and whatever. If not removed, the meat tastes pretty awful.


Edited by Daniel (log)

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Gorgeous photos.. Thanks for posting that..  Yeah, nothing scary about rabbit.. I have never gotten mine with the fur on.. I am assuming fur on helped with the price.. You should try making a terrine.

I have a question, in terms of butchering the rabbit, were you made aware of the glands on the back legs.. Rabbits use this glands to spray territory and whatever. If not removed, the meat tastes pretty awful.

Daniel: I had no idea about the glands - I didn't remove any that I am aware of! I had better do a bit of research before doing that again :) I can't say I noticed any problem with the flavor of the rabbit. I will definitely do a terrine at some point!


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Sorry I'm only getting back to this thread. I'd bought my rabbits frozen for $3 each. Once defrosted I found why they were so inexpensive. There was an odd smell coming from them. Oh well.

jfrater- Your photos are fantastic! I really enjoyed them.

Can anyone tell me if Art of Eating is available online? I'd like to have a look at it.

Thanks,

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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£4......£4........ :angry: The most these are sold, in the fur as you bought yours, is £1-20, seriously this really hacks me off, all they have done is transport it and sell it on :angry::angry::angry:

I could understand £4 for a skinned and jointed bunny but in the fur GRRRrrrrrrrr!!

Try and find someone who shoots or better still ferrets and you will be supplied with succulent rabbit for very little if anything at all, shame I`m at the other end of the country :wink:

Soak the jointed meat in milk and you won`t get any taint, or better still check if it is a doe, as opposed to a buck and you won`t have the smell/taint especially from this time of the year until October(breeding season).


"It's true I crept the boards in my youth, but I never had it in my blood, and that's what so essential isn't it? The theatrical zeal in the veins. Alas, I have little more than vintage wine and memories." - Montague Withnail.

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I have a friend who raises rabbits (one of the benefits of living on the rural edge of suburbia). I nabbed two today. He gave me all the livers from the bunnies he killed yesterday. He said he doesn't think bunny liver makes for good pate, which was my first thought. I had planned to saute the two livers I expected from my two rabbits and eat them on a salad for lunch, but it seems like a waste to cook seven livers for eating on salads. Other ideas?

(The legs are curing for confit, and the saddles will be used in the excellent D'artagnan "Floppy-Eared Chicken" recipe. I have tarragon going bonkers in the garden just begging to season some bunnies.)

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I've recently found myself a regular supply of rabbit (farmed, but good quality). It comes both in the whole beast and jointed. I've made a couple of dishes (braised in red wine with wild mushrooms and later a sort of stir fry riff) with which I was reasonably happy, but wondered what else I can do with it. It is a meat I do like.

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There is always the old German standby for that wascally wabbit called Hasempfeffer. I like and there is also rabbit fricassee. Farm raised rabbit is young and tender. These two are braised recipes for older rabbits hunted in the wild but the recipes are still good for younger ones too. this didn't work a minute ago. Trying again http://honest-food.net/2012/12/04/hasenpfeffer-recipe-dumplings/


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)

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I cook rabbit very often. I have my usual recipe that, every time I try something different, people in the house rebel: coniglio alla bergamasca, to eat with polenta.

Brown the rabbit in pieces in some oil and butter, with rosemary, cloves (about 10), when has a nice color, deglaze with some wine (I prefer white), salt of course, and add some warm water to keep it moist. Cook with a lid ajar for about one hour. I add liver toward the end.

Another way is to cook "alla monferrina" basically you boil the rabbit with flavorings (carrot, celery, onion, sage, etc, cloves, some white wine), let it cool in the water and then remove the meat from the bones in chunks. Make layers in a terrine of meat, salt, garlic, pepper and sage, cover with oil, repeat. Let it rest some days before consuming. This is the traditional recipe and it's fairly good but I don't like it because of botulism concerns. If I could find a way to prepare safely it's a nice dish to keep in hot weather. You add a salad and it's a very good meal.

I also like to use heads and liver for a traditional sauce for pasta from Tuscany.

Garlic, onion, celery, a small carrot, parsley, peeled tomatoes, lemon rind, some rosemary, bay leaves, mixed spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, juniper) a small piece of dark chocolate, a tablespoon of pine nuts, some soaked sultanas, a glass of red wine, some oil, salt and pepper.


Cut the vegetables with the herbs (except the bay leaf that you add whole, afterwards) and soften in oil. Add the cleaned head, brown and deglaze with wine, add tomatoes, sultanas, the spices, chocolate and lemon peel, bay leaf, add some salt, some water and cook about an hour and half. Toward the end you add the liver in pieces. When it's cooked you remove the meat from the bones, and add back to the sauce, remove the lemon peel and the bay leaf. Cook some penne al dente and add to the sauce.

I also like it breaded and fried.


Edited by Franci (log)
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Lapin a la Moutarde/a la diable (rabbit with mustard) is what my mom used to make when I was little. It's a nice braise with Dijon mustard, white wine (I believe) and crème fraîche. It is really delicious because it has a lot of flavor (rabbit on its own does not usually have much), and the rabbit stays very moist. I think I attempted it only once on my own, but did not have a clue about how to properly break down a rabbit at the time (I could only find it whole and it did not occur to me to ask my butcher to do it for me). I want to try this again soon.

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Lapin a la Moutarde/a la diable (rabbit with mustard)

That's definitely going on my list. I remember the first time I ate it - in a restaurant in Putney, London. It was one of those never-to-be-forgotten dishes. It was superb.

Only hope I can do it justice.

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Recently I ate a restaurant meal of deep-fried rabbit over a melange of braised shell beans (black, white, and lima green beans) and fresh cherry tomatoes. The rabbit was boned, dipped in flour or a tempura batter, and deep-fried. It was served piping hot. The beans may have been each cooked separately, to hold their color and shape, then tossed together with some braising liquid, then some halved cherry tomatoes. Sorta like a warm bean salad with the savory braising liquid as a "dressing." Very good!

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I hate to be a naysayer, but I think domestic rabbit isn't worth bothering with. Stringy, little flavour and relatively expensive.

Give me a nice free range chicken any day.

Any recipe that one can do with rabbit can be done equally well if not better with chicken. I suppose the opposite is also true, but why bother.

Wild rabbit & hare is a different story. Those have some taste to them without having be gussied up with every herb & spice in the pantry.

Sorry guys, but I'll take chicken.

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Stringy, little flavour and relatively expensive.

I think you need to change your butcher. The rabbit I buy is neither stringy, flavourless or particularly expensive (it's cheaper than the chicken).

I'll grant you that wild rabbit is different - not necessarily better. Ditto, hare.

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Here is one I made earlier. Well, today.

Leg of rabbit, slow braised (about 8 hours) in red wine with onions, garlic, a basic bouquet garni and a shake of dried chilli flakes; fresh straw mushrooms; rice.

Not a string in sight; full of flavour and cheap.

rabbit in red wine with straw mushrroms.jpg

Edited by liuzhou (log)

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Rabbit shoulders have little meat, but it is some of the best meat around. The livers and kidneys are also wonderful. The legs are OK and the saddles almost not worth eating. Rabbit rillettes with a lot of rosemary are quite nice.

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liuzhou Your rabbit look good and I'm sure tastes good. But I have to ask is the flavour much different from the of a 'cuisse' of chicken or better yet duck?

Here the rabbit is relatively expensive compared to free range chicken. I find it relatively tasteless (unless really sauced up). Perhaps the stringiness comes from eating the wrong part of the rabbit.

Also, maybe I'm over reacting to being served some really really bad rabbit just the other day. With honey no less.

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Bone out the loin and fry....very delicious.

A typical Cajun treatment is rabbit sauce piquante; rabbit is braised in a spicy, highly seasoned tomato gravy. Sauce piquante is used to tenderize and tame gamy meats like wild rabbit, squirrel, alligator, and turtle. John Folses version herehttp://www.jfolse.com/recipes/game/rabbit03.htm

And Marcelle Bienvenues recent here: http://blog.nola.com/recipes/2007/11/rabbit_sauce_piquante.html

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