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sagestrat

Rabbit

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I think with any of the organs, you're talking about getting many many bunny parts before you have much of anything worth cooking.

I bet cooked rabbit livers would make a great amuse-bouche in any number of incarnations...canapes, pureed and stuffed into mushrooms, made as a single ravioli served on a soup spoon for each diner.

Oddly enough, the last two rabbit I cooked had livers of a size nearly equal to their loins. Is this an oddity? Did I have heavy drinking rabbits? :blink:

At any rate, from two rabbits I got two large livers, 3 kidneys the size of gizzards from a 3.5lb. chicken, and two hearts a tad smaller than those. I ended up using the hearts in the stockpot, the livers for my (spoiled) cat, and the kidneys in a sauce, but I'd think, given the richness of organ meats, that you could make a meal for two from two or three bunnies.

Am I nuts?


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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To be honest, I've not seen bunny innards. I just made an assumption based on the size of bunny bodies. I guess I was wrong. Thanks for correcting me!

Eh, who knows. My rabbits might have been from Perigord. :biggrin:


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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I was in Slovakia for Christmas 2001 and I was fortunate enough to be taken out shooting on the 26th - many hare met their match in a slivovitz-fuelled (yet very well run) shoot.

The hearts, liver, lung and kindeys were sauteed with onions, tomatoes, garlic and paprika, then finished with sour cream - really nice with some dense chewy local bread.

I imagine the same would work for rabbit.


Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."

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I made rabbit stew for dinner tonight.

Yesterday, at the market, I bought a whole rabbit. It was sitting in the display case, butterflied and with the head attached. The butcher was kind enough to cut it up for me, and to remove the head. (First the fishmonger offered to remove the fish heads for us, and then the butcher offered to remove the rabbit head for us. Head removal: the sign of good customer service.) I also bought some potatoes, leeks, mushrooms, and tomatoes. All good stew options, I thought.

Back home, I looked over my rabbit. There were a bunch of good looking pieces, and several pieces that were obviously more bone and gristle than meat: sections of the rib cage, for example. I decided to stew them all, figuring that the non-eating pieces would give the stew flavor. I washed the rabbit, and removed the various organs that were still there. (It was great fun pretending I knew what the hell I was doing.)

Never having cooked a rabbit before, I turned to Julia Child's recipe in "The Way to Cook." She suggested marinating the rabbit for 24-48 hours before cooking it. This was perfect, as I didn't want to cook the rabbit until today anyway. I made a marinate from olive oil, the juice and zest from a lemon, some soy sauce, pepper, a handful of dried herb mix, and chopped onions, garlic, and carrots. The pot wouldn't fit in the refrigerator, so I put it in the back of the cave. Every eight hours or so, I stirred the rabbit around in the marinade.

Today I drained the rabbit, dried the pieces off, dredged them in flour, and browned them. Then I cooked the marinade bits, and another cup of chopped onion, in the remaining oil. I deglazed the pan with vermouth, and threw everything into the stew pot. I added a couple of carrots, some potatoes, more vermouth, and the remaining stock. (This is all pretty much according to Julia Child, except for the carrots and potatoes.) I set the whole thing on the stove to simmer for an hour. Near the end I fiddled with the spices, and served it.

It was delicious. The rabbit was tasty and tender. The liquid was delicious. The carrots and tomatoes added. Everything worked.

The only problem is that rabbit is much too much for two people; we had over half the meat left after dinner. I'm definitely making this when guests come to visit.

Bruce

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The only problem is that rabbit is much too much for two people; we had over half the meat left after dinner.

Leftover rabbit is great in a salad of frisee and mache with some crumbled bleu cheese (I like Stilton) and rosemary.

And shredded sundries are wonderful in a risotto.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I used to raise rabbits for dinner, long time ago.

When the does got too old to be productive, they were butchered, boned and the meat put into the pressure cooker. Served with some barbecue sauce on buns, we called the dish "Hoppy Joes".


sparrowgrass

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rabbit is probably one of my favourite animals to cook - if you can get your hands on some wild rabbit, the difference in flavor is a substantial improvement.

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I used to raise rabbits for dinner, long time ago. 

When the does got too old to be productive, they were butchered, boned and the meat put into the pressure cooker.  Served with some barbecue sauce on buns, we called the dish "Hoppy Joes".

Priceless. Where, but on eGullet?


Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

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This is a xpost from the SE restaurant board.

I find the trick to a good rabbit is that it be juicy and taste like rabbit. This sounds simple, but often it is overcooked and has no real distinguisable taste, the whole tastes like chicken thing. The kidneys are also a true treat. The saddle and loin are the most tender and the hind quarters are a tad darker and more flavorful. Rabbits are lean and need to be cooked gently.

Wild rabbit can be very gamey. I am told it often has to do with the way it is butchered (glans or someting like that) and hung to drain the blood. I dont really hunt, but welcome any game to cook, and look forward to learning the proper technique.

I have had Fearringtons braised version and it is very good, but in a sence could be the same using duck, chicken or a game bird using the same spices and cooking technique.

If you ever run across a hopper in the store fresh or frozen I reccomend the following fool proof techinque I got from Jean Georges "Simple to Spectacular"

Butcher rabbit into 5-7 pieces

Submerge in olive oil (not EVOO) with a few cloves of crushed garlic and some thyme

Bake open in the over on 250 for a couple hours.

serve with a bitter green dressed with EVOO salt and lemon juice

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Like several others, I always bone out the loins from the saddle.

Legs. Braise in white wine; braise in red wine; confit in duck fat.

Saddle. Simply roast to medium rare; wrap in bacon and roast; stuff, wrap in bacon and roast; stuff, wrap in caul fat and roast; stuff, wrap in foil and confit.

For stuffing. Use meat from the forequarter and make a farce with egg, cream, herbs, salt and pepper. Puree and pass. Make sure that your loins have the rib flap attached. Spread stuffing on flap and roll.

Remainder of forequarter. Use for stock with loin bones.

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Hassenpfeffer and my favorite recipe is

This one

That has been in several of Sylvia Bashline's cookbooks, including the first which I think was published in the early 80s as that is how long I have been preparing rabbit (or hare) this way.

I also make jugged hare, which is very similar to duck confit, in principal.

I should add that I usually triple or quadruple this recipe and cook it in an electric roaster for parties. People especially love the gravy.

Besides the wild rabbits I get, there is a local (to me) farmer who raises several breeds of rabbit and also Belgian hare, which are much larger than our domestic rabbits. One of these will easily feed six or more.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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A few weeks ago, I made the "Braised Rabbit in Balsamic Sauce" from Lidia's Italian Table (Bastianich, if she needs further identification). Contrary to her suggestions, I just chopped the whole thing into pieces, including all the bony parts and the thin layer of rib meat. So one bunny was two full meals for two people.

It was one of the rare times I actually followed a recipe, and it was excellent. Even made the suggested accompaniment of Swiss Chard and Potatoes -- yummmmmmmm.

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I have been thinking about the sorts of things I might cook over Easter weekend, and rabbit is something that seemed just perfect, in a perverse sort of way (don't hit me!). I had a poke around some recipe books to see what I could see; and nothing I saw was compelling.

I thought some more. Stroked my chin; and pondered. Then it struck me: I could prepare rabbit loins using a tried and true method that I devised for chicken!

First: Create a marinade using a combination of verjus and honey with salt, and marinate the loins for an hour or so, stirring occasionally. I used two heaped teaspoons of honey and about 1/4 c of verjus making this dish for two people; but by all means vary this as you see fit.

Second: After the loins have finished marinading, heat up a cast iron fry pan. Once the pan is hot, take each of the loins out of the marinade, and place in the pan. Hold on to the rest of the marinade! Brown each of the loins.

Then: Once all of the loins are nice and brown; and the honey is starting to caramelise, add the rest of the marinade back into the pan, and continue to cook until the marinade is all caramelised and the rabbit is coated in a delicious sticky glaze.

That, is all there is to it.

Of course, every dish needs a name. With this dish, however, the name came first. This, will be forever known as....

Honey Bunny.

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I have been thinking about the sorts of things I might cook over Easter weekend,  and rabbit is something that seemed just perfect, in a perverse sort of way (don't hit me!).  I had a poke around some recipe books to see what I could see;  and nothing I saw was compelling.

I thought some more.  Stroked my chin;  and pondered.  Then it struck me:  I could prepare rabbit loins using a tried and true method that I devised for chicken!

First:  Create a marinade using a combination of verjus and honey with salt,  and marinate the loins for an hour or so,  stirring occasionally.  I used two heaped teaspoons of honey and about 1/4 c of verjus making this dish for two people;  but by all means vary this as you see fit.

Second:  After the loins have finished marinading,  heat up a cast iron fry pan.  Once the pan is hot,  take each of the loins out of the marinade,  and place in the pan.  Hold on to the rest of the marinade!  Brown each of the loins.

Then:  Once all of the loins are nice and brown;  and the honey is starting to caramelise,  add the rest of the marinade back into the pan,  and continue to cook until the marinade is all caramelised and the rabbit is coated in a delicious sticky glaze.

That, is all there is to it.

Of course,  every dish needs a name.  With this dish, however, the name came first.  This, will be forever known as....

Honey Bunny.

Very nice.


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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I have a whole rabbit in my fridge that needs to be cut up for a recipe tonight. I thought one of my Time-Life Good Cook books had a butchering diagram, but alas, no.

Any cutting tips or a cookbook you could recommend that has good pictures?


Diana Burrell, freelance writer/author

The Renegade Writer's Query Letters That Rock (Marion Street Press, Nov. 2006)

DianaCooks.com

My eGullet blog

The Renegade Writer Blog

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Also if you have a copy of The Zuni Cafe Cookbook, pages 411 - 413 describe how to cut up a rabbit. She (Judy Rodgers) also describes how to cook each of the pieces (i.e. braise the legs, grill the loin).


Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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When I made it, I first took off the hind legs, disjointing them much like you would chicken legs. I then removed the cylindrical loin section, using a flexible boning knife to keep it nice and close to the bone. The rest was chopped up and used in a stew or you could make rabbit stock/demi-glace out of it.


PS: I am a guy.

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I ended up doing an okay job of it, although I suspect I'd flunk on the loin section cuts. The meat was very tasty, but there wasn't much of it. It was either a slender rabbit, or we need to cook two (or more) for dinner next time.


Diana Burrell, freelance writer/author

The Renegade Writer's Query Letters That Rock (Marion Street Press, Nov. 2006)

DianaCooks.com

My eGullet blog

The Renegade Writer Blog

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Most rabbits are very slender. At the Bohemian Cafe in Omaha, I think they serve rabbit halves as a dinner, to give others an idea.

Great place, and great dish, but expecting one rabbit to feed four requires many sides.


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Also, theres no real easy way to portion a rabbit easily for 4 unless your doing a stew. Much easier to serve 2 incomplete rabbits for 4 and then do something else with the leftovers.


PS: I am a guy.

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To me, there's just no getting around the fact that the rib section and the front legs are basically good for the stock pot and not much else. Rabbit does make a lovely stock, though. I cut the hind legs off, and then cut the loin section in two cross-wise, which gives me four serving pieces, or two servings--a leg and a piece of the loin each. For four people, I'd need two rabbits, and would get a beautiful stock to boot.

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