Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
sagestrat

Rabbit

Recommended Posts

Make "coniglio in fricò."

Cu the rabbit up into parts and brown it thoroughly in a heavy pot over high heat. Then throw in some whole cloves of garlic, several sprigs of rosemary and a bunch of juniper berries. Then pour in a thin layer of dry white wine and slap a lid on the pot. Every so often, add a little big more wine to keep a shallow layer of furiously boiling liquid on the bottom of the pan. When the bottle is empty and the last of the wine evaporated, the rabbit is done.


--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rabbit Cacciatore

Cut the rabbit up into parts, season with salt and pepper and brown the pieces in a large pan. Remove the pieces and add a pinch (or more) of red pepper flakes and chopped onions, celery and carrots. Add mushrooms and sliced garlic. Deglaze with a little wine, add some chicken stock and canned tomatos and bring all to a simmer. Return the rabbit and braise for about 20 - 30 minutes. If the sauce hasn't thickened, reduce it some more. Finish with salt, pepper, thyme and parlsey and serve with creamy polenta, mashed potatos or rice.

This of course works well with chicken as well. I find the thighs and legs are better as the white meat tends to dry out a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, I spent forever trying to figure out how to debone/cut up a rabbit. It wasn't rocket science, and I did okay on my own, but when I finally discovered a how-to, I felt much better about the whole process. If you have time and a library, or time, money, and a bookstore nearby, both The CIA's The Professional Chef and Jame's Peterson's The Essentials of Cooking discuss and illustrate rabbit anatomy 101. I think the latter's book about French Cooking also goes into how to de-wascal your wabbit, but check before you buy it.

I mention this because I've always had luck treating the rabbit's saddle and his legs as two separate meats. My best rabbit meals have involved braising the two hind legs in wine and stock, pan-frying the loins, and simmering the front legs and everything else for stock and/or shredded meat for pasta sauce.

edit: anamtomy? DOH!


Edited by fimbul (log)

A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I mention this because I've always had luck treating the rabbit's saddle and his legs as two separate meats. My best rabbit meals have involved braising the two hind legs in wine and stock, pan-frying the loins, and simmering the front legs and everything else for stock and/or shredded meat for pasta sauce.

That is absolutely the way to go. At the present moment I am in the process of braising rabbit legs. In Charlie Palmer's newly published "Art of Aureole" there is a recipe for "Rabbit four ways" with recipes for each part. Each segment can be prepared independently and it is a very useful guide. I cut up all my birds for cooking as well and never cook chicken or duck breasts along with the legs.


Ruth Friedman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That is absolutely the way to go. At the present moment I am in the process of braising rabbit legs. In Charlie Palmer's newly published "Art of Aureole" there is a recipe for "Rabbit four ways" with recipes for each part. Each segment can be prepared independently and it is a very useful guide. I cut up all my birds for cooking as well and never cook chicken or duck breasts along with the legs.

I rarely roast a bird whole myself. I make exceptions for chicken and quail, but duck, guinea hen, pheasant, etc. all get divvied up into tough and tender.

Is the Charlie Palmer book worthwhile? What are his four methods for bunny?


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patricia Wells At Home in Provence has a killer recipe for rabbit that is a basic brown-in-olive-oil-then-braise with preserved lemon, white wine, several heads of garlic and a bouquet garnis. I do it often with chicken thighs as well.

BTW, I highly recommend the book. Lots of great and accessible recipes.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll second that recommendation. It's a fine book.

Most of the rabbit recipes I've seen say to make sure not to cook the rabbit too long, as it will dry out easily, even in a braise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've taken to boning out the rabbit for a boneless saddle stuffed with the legmeat and whatever else you want to add. the bones are then used to make a stock for reduction with the liver. It's a little time consuming and requires precise knife technique as well as sharp knives but makes a nice presentation. WE won't have any tomorrow as our rabbit hunt came up empty handed today! -Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stewed bunny, with lots of herbs (got to give them something good to eat)

Fried bunny (does NOT taste like chicken); how come that bird had 4 legs??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is the Charlie Palmer book worthwhile? What are his four methods for bunny?

He does a crisply breaded flank with citrus vinaigrette, braised legs with lavender scented sauce and saffron risotto, confit rack (in duck fat) and sautéed loin.

I used thyme rather than lavender because my husband didn't like the idea of the lavender.

There are a lot of great recipes in the book and most are easy to break down into components. His salmon confit in duck fat was the best piece of salmon I ever prepared.

There is a porcini dusted monkfish with caramelized fennel. I have not yet done the monkfish but the caramelized fennel was superb and would work with any fish or meat dish for the matter.

I have the book only for a couple of weeks and there are a lot more dishes I want to try. It is not a book for the timid as the recipes require time, effort and some experience but I love it and am already planning his "Port-glazed foie gras and tuna terrine" for my next dinner party.


Ruth Friedman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know how to prepare rabbit so that the saddle doesn't dry out? Seems to me that the saddle must be cooked separately. Does brining help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, need to know the source of your rabbit. If frozen from China, then you are already behind the 8 ball. If fresh or a hunted wild rabbit, then you should debone the saddle and stuff it with the tenderloins and deboned meat from the legs. Use the carcass to make stock along with the liver for a sauce eventually. Stuff the saddle with the meat and whatever suits you. Tie it all up, sear in a fry pan and then into the oven until rare which depends on how big your rabbit is. They can rnage from a # or two to 5 for large domestics. Let rest for 5-10 minutes again depending on the size. Serve with the sauce and whatever vegatables you want. Keys are fresh rabbit, boned and rare. -Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cooked a couple of young rabbits, each about three and a half pounds.

I brined in salt and sugar solution for twelve hours. After searing I braised them low and slow for three hours. Result was falling off the bone tender.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way I have always baked a rabbit without any drying effect is to stuff the rabbit with a stuffing made of day old bread, minced and add onions and mixed herbs etc. Sew the opening up. Not too fancy. Bake in moderate oven. The stuffing retains the moisture Many older people wrap the rabbit in brown paper once stuffed, and remove to brown it, pre oil the rabbit first. Or bake in a dish with fats, and cover entirely with brown paper. (Good sturdy paper such as supermarket bags are great)

I have never felt the need to remove any of the flesh or bones.

hmmm have not had a good rabbit for a long time, now I am wishing I had some now! hahahhaa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any time you have the oppurtunity to cook a protien on the bone, do so.

This is where much of your flavor comes from, it also promotes even cooking.

I prepare saddle in a # of ways, but technique is what is important.

You can confit the thighs and legs a few days in advance, then season your saddle,sear and place in a very hot oven for 15/20 minutes.

Remove the saddle and put foil over it (tightly, not as a tent) this will help to hold the heat and help the blood rest.

I love glazed parsnips and Charintias carrots (in season) and fresh hearts of palm with rabbit.


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend has access to whole rabbits, all organs intact. I was wondering if anyone had any good ideas for preparing rabbit organ meats. I know it would require a substantial amount of rabbits to make anything with say, livers or kidneys, but any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's probably pretty obvious, but I should think the livers and/or kidneys of two rabbits would make a great pasta sauce. This is off the top of my head, but my ideas are running in this direction:

Saute them until just pink, remove from pan. Add fennel, garlic, and thyme to the pan, then deglaze with rabbit or chicken stock and white wine. Reduce to desired consistency. Chop up the organs, return them to the pan with the liquid for a second, then pour over pasta.

I, uh, cooked a lot of rabbit this weekend. :rolleyes:


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

where are you guys that you can get whole rabbits? I want some...preferably with some of their blood too.


"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in Alexandria/Arlington, VA. The local Whole Foods sells whole bunnies, though they come sans blood.


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think with any of the organs, you're talking about getting many many bunny parts before you have much of anything worth cooking.

I bet cooked rabbit livers would make a great amuse-bouche in any number of incarnations...canapes, pureed and stuffed into mushrooms, made as a single ravioli served on a soup spoon for each diner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You asked for innard-specific recipes, but if that leaves you with a whole bunch of rabbits left over....

Check out the Zuni Cafe Cookbook for the rabbit mixed grill recipe towards the back: I think Judy Rogers wrote it specifically to address the problem of trying to cook everything on/in a rabbit for one meal.


Edited by eunny jang (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...