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thom

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    http://www.northernrestaurantandbar.co.uk

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    Glossop, England
  1. As far as I know Roganic is definitely shutting so The French (and adjacent soon-to-launch brasserie "Mr Coopers") are his defacto solves ventures outside his Cartmel home turf. Big Hospitality reported on this a week or so ago: http://www.bighospitality.co.uk/Venues/Simon-Rogan-to-close-Roganic-plans-second-restaurant-in-Manchester Good grief, the North hanging on to it's own talent?! Whatever next... Very, very exciting times! Cheers Thom
  2. Another weekend, another review in the nationals. This time the Independent on Sunday, with a spanking 9.5/10 rating. They love the room, the ox ribeye tartare (one of their all time top ten dishes so they say) and they even like the contentious carpet. Have any other foruministas eaten there yet? Cheers Thom
  3. Giles' review is out. In short, a sterling 8/10: "But, hell, it’s a wonderful restaurant. One of the best around." Cheers Thom
  4. Ah yes, I remember the Nico days, but I think he was in a different room, The French has always been The French. It will be interesting to see how Simon beds in, I was in there yesterday for lunch (£29 for three courses, three 'bells and whistles' and an excellent bread basket) and it was fantastic, though it should be with Simon putting in 17 hour days! It was about a third full but apparently just about every dinner slot, weekday and weekend, is booked solid for the next few weeks, and some lunches (particularly the weekends) have been stacked too. I know it's early days, but it is also unprecedented for any high-end restaurant to launch in Manchester with that sort of traffic, particularly in a hotel. Giles Coren was in on Wednesday and tweeted indiscreetly (indistweeted?) that it was "magnificent". We shall see if that follows through into a nice Times review in a few weeks time. It would be a first for Giles in Manchester (witness the excruciating Metro-centric bile in his Aumbry review) though he did get in a dig about The French being worth the "eight hour round trip". Cheers Thom
  5. I believed Simon Rogan, with hopefully another few top chefs leading the charge, would pique the interest and provide a story for the national press to take notice of our fair city's gastronomic blossoming. And so it begins. Manchester has been listed as one of Observer Food Monthly's Top 50 foodie highlights from around the UK and indeed the globe. http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...od-interactive One swallow etc etc but a nice bit of recognition and media traction. A bit of momentum never hurt anyone and nor, in terms of economic impact, did gastrotourism (a horrible phrase but a genuine and growing leisure sector now). Cheers Thom
  6. Harters, don't despair, the vast majority of diners when I was there were regular customers to the French (and many of them, yes, had wrinkles). In fact they seem to have once again pursued a convention-busting approach with no hugely retainered PR team, and no all-singing all dancing launch party festooned with the stars of sport and screen. Softly soft-launching seems the order of the day. I had no problem with what the French represented previously (I am a sucker for the classic chops and formal charm of Le Gavroche) but sadly it was not executed in any way well enough. My last visit earlier this year was badly disappointing, and the audience of good folk like yourself who enjoyed the status quo were a dwindling band whose special occasion visits could not sustain it as a business. So yes I like it's freshness and I like it's confidence, and as with architecture I find a bold contemporary response is usually more pleasing than a hand-wringing attempt at well-intended pastiche, except to the Prince Charles of the world. It feels like the product of a singular vision, and I like the tables, handmade from trees felled in Cheshire (though personally I do like a good bit of linen). The food was excellent, and may yet bed in to be truly brilliant, and the environment it offers still feels very special to me, and a whole bedpost of notches up on anything else in the city centre. It may become the restaurant of choice for the anniversaries, proposals and graduations of a whole new generation of Mancunians, but hopefully thid time it will be a Mecca for food-nerds too. I think you might hate the carpets though. Like Uncle Buck's hat they will anger a lot of people. And Gary, as for Bapi's lunch, we'll just have to put that to the test! Cheers Thom
  7. I went, I ate, it was bloody spectacular. The front of house is a slightly uneasy melding of new (Rogan staff) and old (The French stalwarts) but that will resolve over time, and the fit out is bold, playful and confident - the old guard will bemoan the Scandi-chic snd un-naped tables (let alone the polarising faux wooden carpet) but personally I loved the clean modern feel and the way it offset the now restrained opulence of the room. Belting chandeliers too. The food? Not flawless (some bread has caught, and I found a recurring smidge of over-seasoning here and there, and maybe a single dish unbalanced) but brilliant, and eating at a level very close to L'Enclume which is staggering when you consider the brigade is newly thrown together and the ovens only got installed that day. I won't describe in detail, you all know what Rogan is about, but the ox ribeye tartare with charcoal oil, smoked sunflower seeds, kohlrabi balls and sunflower shoots was utterly breathtaking. Simon has absolute confidence in his team (Dan Cox et al) and says The French will improve rather than dip as it beds in. That is a significantly different dynamic to many Manchester restaurants. With Aiden Byrne still to open, along with discussions with one other Michelin star chef and a rumoured American big name, Manchester may finally have the fine-dining cherry(ies?) on the top of the seriously impressive breadth, depth and variety of it's dining scene. The French, if it sustains, is nailed on Michelin star standard. Be cynical about empire-building and ill-judged and unloved diffusion restaurants all you want, but from what I know of Simon that Is simply not his style. If he wanted a launch pad to global expansion and big money deals for four day a year consultancies in Dubai or Vegas he'd be putting his heart and soul into London. It's the high visibility gateway to the world dontcha know? He's not, because he genuinely loves Manchester as a city and it is easier for him to manage from Cartmel (a quick whizz away up the M6). Sure restaurants in the North have 'grown' big and acquired reputations and gravitas over time, but I can't think of a restaurant that has 'launched' this big in term of potential, ambition, anticipation and significance to a region's eating and drinking scene. Certainly not North of Birmingham in my dining lifetime. It's a game changer people, you need to come and try it. And feel free to hate the furniture and/or the carpets. But not the chandelier. The chandelier is magical. Cheers Thom
  8. I said this too, in a previous post (apologies for lack of chronological ordering): "Yeah Holly, that's pretty much it. Very much echos my own thoughts (albeit much more articulately). I was a bit of a cynic about social media generally (I am still deeply sceptical about Facebook) and was thus late (begrudgingly late) to the party. I knew I had to get to grips with social media when it started turning my exhibition marketing campaigns on their head - my marketing team were using terminology I knew nothing about and that's never a healthy thing (or at least not when I'm a relatively young 37!). Since then I haven't looked back. I follow around 625 people and have about 800 following me, and I have built this community up organically over less than twelve months. As you say in terms of local/regional coverage it's unparalleled, and the mechanics that, with very little tangiable structure, tend to bring like-minded people and content on twitter together is uncanny. The vast majority of my followers are posting about restaurants in Manchester/England's NorthWest, on topics that are directly relevent to me, and are absolutely up to the minute and news-worthy. That is compelling. Amazing new seasonal menu in a restaurant? Twitter tells me first, and probably has images of the signature dishes and a link to the full menu. A popular Mancunian restaurant closes? Chances are one of my twitter-buddies will walk past it that same day, notice, and tweet it, meaning word spreads within hours. It's the minutia, immediacy and relevance that makes it so addictive. The other thing I love about twitter is it always encourages you to reach out to new people and pursue new content (click through rates on links far outstrip Facebook) whereas Facebook seems to be talking to a group of people you already know (or knew). Because of the way twitter works I can ask questions about a pub that does good steak and ale pie in the Peak District, or the best way stuffing for a belly of lamb, or whatever happened to the chef from a long-gone restaurant and have a pretty good chance of getting a constructive answer (or indeed answers) within minutes. Thinking about it (and most of my posts on here are a little stream of conciousness so apologies!) I have also noticed that the most prolific posters on eGullet UK tend to be older/retired, which wasn't the case five or ten years ago. It seems as an older generation embraces websites the younger folk (in relative terms) are moving on to social media. It was ever thus! Also thinking about it the people who make up my twitter family are exactly the sort of passionate, informed and articulate people I would have seen all over eGullet a few years ago and now I know for a fact that the vast majority of them haven't even heard of it, let alone posted there. legions of fanatical foodies, chefs and restaurateurs (the net-worky "heads up" type who get involved in discussions, committees, charity work etc rather than those chained to their stoves!), consultants, and worse still restaurant media folk, PR's and journalists. These people should be all OVER eGullet, but twitter (and the websites it points them to to cherry-pick plumb bits of content) is more than enough for them. It takes time to get into twitter (I had one false start before I went back to it months later and finally got a toe-hold) but try it, once you have a little gaggle of mates on there it really will revolutionise the way you exchange and consume restaurant information. I guarantee you'll end up better informed than you ever were before! Right, semi-literate rambling over for the night. Bed is calling. My better half used to hate me keeping the lamp on to read (I stay awake much later than her) so now I keep the light off and tap away on my phone as a wind-down, perusing the BBC or catching up on sports articles on the Guardian. But guess what will be the last site I scan through before shut-eye, not to mention the first I check over breakfast the next morning, just to check I'm not missing out on the latest? Yep, it begins with t..." In fact probably easier for you to read the thread, here it is (albeit already a year out of date, things move so fast...) To be fair the eGullet management messaged me about it and we had an interesting chat. Still a shame to lock the topic, it could have been an interesting little brainstorming session. Bloody hell, have I been on eGullet nearly twelve years? Seen so many arguments, splits, coups, software upgrades. Halcyon days, life was simpler a decade ago I swear (before I became a parent for a start...) Cheers Thom
  9. I posted is is a similar thread some time ago: "In Topic: The Demise of Online Food Forums 03 June 2011 - 02:02 PM I agree with the sentiment above. I'm a staunch long-term supporter of eGullet (signed up since 2001 no less, ahead of my ex-company launching Restaurant Magazine) and although I havent always been the most prolific poster (though I'm sure my post-count got reset some years ago during upgrades!) I have always contributed, have always taken delight in lurking and reading, and have made some real and lasting friendships. In short it saddens me that I just don't find the site as compelling as I did, and that I spend so little time here (this thread is ironically the most engaged I have been for donkey's years!). I do think social media, and indeed blogging (most bloggers drive traffic to their blogs via their social media presence and contacts, have eaten away at eGullet's audience (and that of comparable sites), and the architecture and functionality here (as well as the underlying philosophy perhaps?) has stopped the site taking full advantage of these advances when really, as a long-established, well-populated, content-rich website social media should be a virtual panacea for traffic and profile (see how www.manchesterconfidential.com and it's staff work it in my home city). I know you can link to twitter via your profile on here, and indeed that eGullet has a twitter account but - although I'm certainly no social media expert, just a passionate user - this doesn't seem anywhere near enough (almost a token effort, or at least misguided in it's execution) and is doing what eGullet is and could be a diservice. I'm sure there is tons of content generated on here every day that half my followers would love to be connected to but I haven't the time to dig around and find it. Make it easy for me, I want to help. I would also echo another of the earlier points that at the minute this website is too broad and over-facing, a lack of focus which ironically has, I feel, contributed to a thinning of the fresh content. I know this is a chicken/egg situation with the volume and depth of postings but really although it's nice to keep up with UK dining (and indeed keep an eye on high profile international stuff) what I'm really interested in is information about the restaurants I do/could visit in my region, and the food I could/should be eating every day. Not sure what the answer is but I know from twitter that there are more than enough informed foodies (and industry professionals) with the time and web access to constantly post and produce content about their eating experiences and opinions online and it must be possible in some way to leverage or channel this through what was, to me, the spiritual home of food-nerds on the web. You're potentially a sleeping giant eGullet." In retrospect it's clearer than that. People who think twitter is about 140 characters are, sadly, mistaken. Twitter is about forming a passionate network of like-minded individuals through shared interests who direct you to fantastic content (be that personal blogs or professional content that was off my radar) either on a constant basis, or when you specifically need it. I get exposed to more interesting and useful information, from a broader and equally committed and informed set of people, about restaurants that I'm interested in (Manchester restaurants for example) on twitter than I ever would on here in it's heyday, let alone now. Probably by a factor of about 100. The gulf is almost incomparable. It comes down to fulfilling a need: i like to read and talk about restaurants, twitter does it better than forums. I see the same demise in other hobby forums I go on, from architecture to fantasy football to vintage watches. Every board has regular comments, if not specific threads, bemoaning the death of the forums, the lack of posts and the thinning of intelligent discourse. It's just the nature of online interaction changing. Interestingly all the old big beasts that used to post fanatically on eGullet (the David Goodfellows and Harters of their day!), some of whom are now good friends, others still merely avatars, are now on twitter: Bapi, Gary Marshall, Scott Friar, Vinosity, Andy Lynes, not to mention a BILLION chefs, food writers, critics (Jay, Marina et al). All bantering, constantly. There's still a place for eGullet, it's asset-base is large, but at the minute it seems shut off from social media. As if always the case it should embrace the change, it could ride the new wave better than it thinks. At the minute it's nervously sipping it's glass of wine in the sparsely populated dining room of the Internet, when the raucous and compelling party is it the kitchen. Cheers Thom
  10. Room is not bad, but also not great. On a recent judging visit I was also dismayed to see dirty heavily marked tableware throughout the meal and an assiette of desserts where the knife wasn't clean between slicing each element into portions leading to cross-contamination - not a world-ending disaster but an unfortunate indication of slack kitchen habits... San Carlo is fine, but to be honest I've never found the food above acceptable (likewise for Rosso, which has previously been accused by those in the trade of buying in sauces and desserts). Personally, on the basis of much too much personal experimentation, I'd say Cicchetti (also owned by San Carlo group) knocks them all into a cocked hat. It's slick, bustling, and yes it has plenty of "dressed up" folk but I feel equally comfortable piling in post-football in scruffs. The pasta and meat dishes are pretty good, and the pizzas are probably the best in town. The fact the menu is based on a Cicchetti small plates concept means lots of opportunity to try different dishes, mix and match or share. Otherwise as noted Grill on the Alley (or sister restaurant Grill on New York St) are safe bets for classy but accessible crowd-pleasing steaks and seafood with almost unfailingly friendly and professional service, and Gaucho isn't cheap but is great for steaks (and the divine cheese-bread). Also great for steaks is the Malmaison's rebranded restaurant Smoak, which has a slightly weird kitsch Americana fit-out but also has one of the famous Josper charcoal grills which means it's grill dishes can be fantastic (the cheap bavette/skirt steak frites with peppercorn sauce is a winner). The Chophouses, Sams and Mr Thomas's, are good too if you like pubbier pubs. Proper hearty rib-sticking fair, some decent beers and a kick-arse wine-list. The classic dishes are the home-corned corned beef hash or the home-made steak and kidney pudding (proper suet pudding - heaven!) which comes with tons of chips, fresh peas and a little jug of gravy. If you fancy a wild-card a new French restaurant has opened in the Light apartment building on Church St. First reports are good, and the menu sounded like it ticked the boxes of classic peasant cuisine. If you decide to try Asian then Red Chilli for spicy Sichuan dishes tends to get the eGullet vote, with plenty of fans for Red and Hot too. Also in Chinatown is Phetpalin which for my money is the best and most authentic Thai in town at the moment. No shortage of good Indian or at least Pakistani restaurants too - EastZEast and Akbars tend to draw most plaudits but personally I'd wonder down towards the University quarter and go for Zouk in the Quadrangle. Don't be put off by the madness of chips and bloody omelette on the menu, it has some seriously authentic dishes (like brain!) Based on recent city centre eating experiences I'd also flag up Vertigo of worthy of explanation, and Australasia offers a beautiful setting and although the pacific rim cooking/sushi isn't as knockout as at launch it's still pretty good (though Jay Rayner didn't approve). That said both offer more formal eating experiences than you may be looking for... Hope that helps, let me know if you have any more interest in specific areas. Cheers Thom
  11. Yang Sing is 'fine', but nothing more, and is widely acknowledged to be trading on long-distant glories. Wings is also 'fine', but has ideas and prices above it's station. Red Chilli is arse-kickingly good if you stick to the authentic Sichaun stuff (hot poached mutton, French beans with minced pork, Beijing dumplings, spring onion bread are all great dishes.) Some also like the Sichuan Red and Hot, but for me it didn't quite match up, and the Hunan place in Chinatown (possibly called Hunan but I might be wrong?) Glamorous restaurant is pretty good, though Jay Rayner was underwhelmed on his last trip. It's probably on a par with the Tai Pan which is also above a cash and carry, this time on Upper Brook Steet. The place next to the McDonalds on Oxford Road (Tai Wu?) does the best dim sum in town but I have to say it's not great, good dim sum is currently a rariety in Manchester. Final choice is the Handmade Noodle King in Chinatown which, as it's name suggests, does very good noodle soups etc, and also has an addictive Korean BBQ element to the menu. Enjoy!
  12. Pep, thanks so much for this, I'll have a look. The thing I love about having an app like twitter (on a smart-phone which generally doesn't allow multi-tab browsing) is that if I'm flicking through my twitter timeline and see a link I like I can click on it, which opens it in the phone browser, then still flick straight back to twitter as the app remains open whilst the page is loading. If I'm using eGullet on my phone browser and follow a link from the site then eGullet is gone (a whole "back" click away!) and thus has lost me. So yes, an app to let me view eGullet sounds great. The other issue is more fundamental perhaps (and I say this ahead of having checked out how the site actually appears in the app) which is that the massive bulk of content on eGullet is of no interest to me (at this current time) and it's tricky and time-consuming and click-intensive to drill down to the stuff that appeals on a regular basis (in contrast to skimming through a timeline of twitter which has what are in effect bite-size precis of content from people I have specifically chosen to follow because what they talk about tends to interest me). To solve this might require a fundamental rethinking of how eGullet functions. Sure I'd probably like to have an app which let me choose which updates I saw as standard but would it only be on a forum basis (ie subscribe to the UK forum?). To be honest I miss out on good posts from people in other forums (Food Media for example) as I just don't have enough reason to pop in there, it could be interesting to choose to follow the posts of particular posters who I find interesting no matter which forum they are on? It would be nice to feel less wedded to my home forum. Can this already be done on eGullet? Possibly, but if so it's a criminal failing that I, as a moderately web-literate nerd with too much time on my hands who has been using this site for a decade, doesn't know about it! Yeah, we're a lazy generation, we like to be spoon-fed and hand-held... I'll have a look at the app thing this weekend though, thanks again Pep. Cheers Thom
  13. I agree with the sentiment above. I'm a staunch long-term supporter of eGullet (signed up since 2001 no less, ahead of my ex-company launching Restaurant Magazine) and although I havent always been the most prolific poster (though I'm sure my post-count got reset some years ago during upgrades!) I have always contributed, have always taken delight in lurking and reading, and have made some real and lasting friendships. In short it saddens me that I just don't find the site as compelling as I did, and that I spend so little time here (this thread is ironically the most engaged I have been for donkey's years!). I do think social media, and indeed blogging (most bloggers drive traffic to their blogs via their social media presence and contacts, have eaten away at eGullet's audience (and that of comparable sites), and the architecture and functionality here (as well as the underlying philosophy perhaps?) has stopped the site taking full advantage of these advances when really, as a long-established, well-populated, content-rich website social media should be a virtual panacea for traffic and profile (see how www.manchesterconfidential.com and it's staff work it in my home city). I know you can link to twitter via your profile on here, and indeed that eGullet has a twitter account but - although I'm certainly no social media expert, just a passionate user - this doesn't seem anywhere near enough (almost a token effort, or at least misguided in it's execution) and is doing what eGullet is and could be a diservice. I'm sure there is tons of content generated on here every day that half my followers would love to be connected to but I haven't the time to dig around and find it. Make it easy for me, I want to help. I would also echo another of the earlier points that at the minute this website is too broad and over-facing, a lack of focus which ironically has, I feel, contributed to a thinning of the fresh content. I know this is a chicken/egg situation with the volume and depth of postings but really although it's nice to keep up with UK dining (and indeed keep an eye on high profile international stuff) what I'm really interested in is information about the restaurants I do/could visit in my region, and the food I could/should be eating every day. Not sure what the answer is but I know from twitter that there are more than enough informed foodies (and industry professionals) with the time and web access to constantly post and produce content about their eating experiences and opinions online and it must be possible in some way to leverage or channel this through what was, to me, the spiritual home of food-nerds on the web. You're potentially a sleeping giant eGullet.
  14. Yeah Holly, that's pretty much it. Very much echos my own thoughts (albeit much more articulately). I was a bit of a cynic about social media generally (I am still deeply sceptical about Facebook) and was thus late (begrudgingly late) to the party. I knew I had to get to grips with social media when it started turning my exhibition marketing campaigns on their head - my marketing team were using terminology I knew nothing about and that's never a healthy thing (or at least not when I'm a relatively young 37!). Since then I haven't looked back. I follow around 625 people and have about 800 following me, and I have built this community up organically over less than twelve months. As you say in terms of local/regional coverage it's unparalleled, and the mechanics that, with very little tangiable structure, tend to bring like-minded people and content on twitter together is uncanny. The vast majority of my followers are posting about restaurants in Manchester/England's NorthWest, on topics that are directly relevent to me, and are absolutely up to the minute and news-worthy. That is compelling. Amazing new seasonal menu in a restaurant? Twitter tells me first, and probably has images of the signature dishes and a link to the full menu. A popular Mancunian restaurant closes? Chances are one of my twitter-buddies will walk past it that same day, notice, and tweet it, meaning word spreads within hours. It's the minutia, immediacy and relevance that makes it so addictive. The other thing I love about twitter is it always encourages you to reach out to new people and pursue new content (click through rates on links far outstrip Facebook) whereas Facebook seems to be talking to a group of people you already know (or knew). Because of the way twitter works I can ask questions about a pub that does good steak and ale pie in the Peak District, or the best way stuffing for a belly of lamb, or whatever happened to the chef from a long-gone restaurant and have a pretty good chance of getting a constructive answer (or indeed answers) within minutes. Thinking about it (and most of my posts on here are a little stream of conciousness so apologies!) I have also noticed that the most prolific posters on eGullet UK tend to be older/retired, which wasn't the case five or ten years ago. It seems as an older generation embraces websites the younger folk (in relative terms) are moving on to social media. It was ever thus! Also thinking about it the people who make up my twitter family are exactly the sort of passionate, informed and articulate people I would have seen all over eGullet a few years ago and now I know for a fact that the vast majority of them haven't even heard of it, let alone posted there. legions of fanatical foodies, chefs and restaurateurs (the net-worky "heads up" type who get involved in discussions, committees, charity work etc rather than those chained to their stoves!), consultants, and worse still restaurant media folk, PR's and journalists. These people should be all OVER eGullet, but twitter (and the websites it points them to to cherry-pick plumb bits of content) is more than enough for them. It takes time to get into twitter (I had one false start before I went back to it months later and finally got a toe-hold) but try it, once you have a little gaggle of mates on there it really will revolutionise the way you exchange and consume restaurant information. I guarantee you'll end up better informed than you ever were before! Right, semi-literate rambling over for the night. Bed is calling. My better half used to hate me keeping the lamp on to read (I stay awake much later than her) so now I keep the light off and tap away on my phone as a wind-down, perusing the BBC or catching up on sports articles on the Guardian. But guess what will be the last site I scan through before shut-eye, not to mention the first I check over breakfast the next morning, just to check I'm not missing out on the latest? Yep, it begins with t...
  15. As per some previous posters this is an issue I have thought about on a semi-regular basis over the last year or so. As a result of my pontifications I have two main points to make: The first is that this isn't just a food fora issue. Amongst my other passions/addictions are architecture (specifically the urban built environment) and fantasy football and I also post on forums for these subjects which are near identical (scarily in terms of characters of posters as well as technical functionality) to eGullet. I hear exactly the same laments and have noticed the exact same tail-off in poster numbers/quality on www.skyscrapercity.com and http://www.fiso.co.uk/forum. It's an online fora issue across the board, gastronomy has nothing to do with it. The second is social media. Forget it being a trendy buzzword, over the past two years it has come from nowhere to seriously rewrite my business models (I organise exhibitions and events) and it has also changed my own personal online habits beyond recognition. Social media is simply a more addictive way of finding new people and new opinions about subjects I'm passionate about and also sharing my own opinions (particularly twitter, I'm less convinced about Facebook). Sure the content within the social media is more limited than forums (140 characters for example) but it directs me to indepth content/blogs/forums I would never find under my own steam. I no longer need a "home" forum to be "based" at. I guess it's like cloud computing in a way. I thought I was addicted to online forums dedicated to subjects I was passionate about. Turns out that largely I just like bantering with people I like about subjects I love in an online environment, whilst continuing to expand my "social circle" and exposure to new writing and other media. That time-slot in my day (limited by running a company as well as family and kids damn them) is now taken up by social media. The fact that it also a hell of a lot easier to use social media on a smartphone (particularly twitter) means I can fit my food-nerdism into snatched downtime on train journeys, in bank queues, in tedious meetings or whilst my kids run around a playground. In the UK at least this massive and continued switch to smartphones is driving internet usage. I should point out that over time I have found more and more of the old "big beasts" of eGullet who were great posters (authoritative, interesting, altruistic and prolific) have been cropping up on twitter. Some I was in touch with anyway as friends and didn't realise they tweeted, others I never met irl but had read so much on eGullet that seeing their user names on twitter was like seeing an old friend again! Building up this database and keeping up to date with what they're eating and where has been one of my great recent pleasures (yes, I have a sad life...). Why have none of my favoured forums got a phone specific app? It's the next step surely to ensure the many positives that sites like eGullet have (a real community, a massive bank of information) remain current, relevent and accessable as technology and people's interaction with it move on. I'm sure the eggheads at eGullet are ahead of the curve on this and are beavering away even as we speak (type)! I lurk more and I post less on all my forums, but if you want to talk to me come play on twitter. That's the way it is, for me at least, and as a very late adopter to social media I could never have predicted this even 18 months ago. Interesting times... (/inarticulate and meandering ramble) ETA: Ironically I made my first post on here for a long time today (see Australasia on UK Dining) and thus noticed my horribly out-dated signature (wrong company etc etc). I updated it as you see it below, and subsequently saw this thread the very same day. Spooky bit of coincidence considering the points I outline above. Must have been why the title subliminally piqued my interest when I saw it on the homepage.
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