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sagestrat

Rabbit

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It has been a long time but my most successful attempt was a 2 prong attack. I found the loin (saddle?) to be really white meaty like chicken breast so I did that browned, glazed with something spicy and flavorful and roasted but with a little liquid around to give steam. The leggy "darker meat" parts I did like coq au vin- very tasty.

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The best rabbit I've ever had was a braised rabbit on pappardelle pasta I had at The Girl and The Fig in Sonoma. I think the sauce was a little mustardy and a little garlicky. I think there was also a bit of pork smokiness from some bacon lardons. So good!

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if its a whole rabbit the toughest part is cutting it up... after that its easy.

dredge the pieces (figure on 8 pieces or so from one whole rabbit, how you portion them isnt important so long as they are roughly similar size) in flour and saute briefly in olice oil to brown.

take them out and saute a whole mess of onions and mushrooms (try for flavorful ones, like porcinis, dried if fresh arent available)

put the rabbit pieces back in, cover with a bottle of red wine (you can add a glass of port or sherry for a stickier flavor, but you dont have to)

add water to cover if the wine isnt enough, and add your choice of herbs (i use thyme, rosemary and marjoram, plus a couple of chili peppers for a little residual heat)

simmer covered till the rabbit is tender (1 to 2 hours depending on size)

toss in a little cream to thicken the sauce if you want, then serve with good crusty bread to sop up the gravy.

damn, im gonna have to find some rabbit to cook now.... good luck!

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Similar to what maher does, my favorite way of cooking rabbit is in mustard sauce. Slather the rabbit with Dijon mustard & refrigerate a couple of hours, then blot off the excess mustard, flour and brown the pieces (I use butter and oil). Remove while sauteeing mushrooms (and onions or leeks, if desired). Return the rabbit to the pan, add wine (I usually use white for this), chicken stock, and herbs. Bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer, covered, until the rabbit is cooked. Thicken the sauce with a little cream or creme fraiche at the end. Delicious!

The same basic recipe, cooked with more liquid, also makes a wonderful soup. Remove the rabbit when it's done and shred the meat, discarding the bones. You can add rice or wild rice to this while it's cooking.


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Or lapin à la dijonnaise. Slather the rabbit (whole) with mustard and put in a baking dish. Bake for an hour. Afterward, scrape off the mustard into the juices in the pan, add a big dollop of crème fraîche, and reheat, stirring and scraping.

As far as the loin/saddle goes - it's not really equivalent to white meat chicken, since it is the fattiest part of the rabbit. Much fattier (and tastier) than the legs, though with lots of treacherous little bones...

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Lucy (bleudauvergne) has done wonderful things with rabbit- clicky


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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You could always make a terrine with it - bone the rabbit, mix in a processor with sausage meat, then add whole hazelnuts, juniper berries and herbs. Put it in a bain marie for about 90 mins at 180C

While it's cooking (and cooling down) you could also use the bones to make rabbit stock.

Another favourite recipe of mine is to bone the rabbit keeping the flesh in one piece (quite tricky). Then lay an omelette and herbs on top, roll it up and tie. Use the bones to make a stock and braise the meat in this for about 2 hours (I think). To serve, slice the meat and reveal the yellow omelette spiralling through :smile:

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Another favourite recipe of mine is to bone the rabbit keeping the flesh in one piece (quite tricky).

I've done this, and would concur that it's a major PITA; if you want to do this, either have a lot of time on your hands or have a second rabbit and some Activa handy to patch the holes.

I've turned the rabbit stock into "fresh-squeezed bunny juice" (gelatin-clarified consommé), which gets a lot of weird looks.

My favorite braised dish was a rabbit which had been braised with pears and white wine.

You can also:

- stuff the saddle

- debone and stuff the legs

- confit the legs

- make rabbit sausages

- make meatballs

- make hasenpfeffer

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I've got a rabbit stew recipe on my website. Or stuff it and roast it much like a chicken. Yummmmm.

That looks lovely, thanks. I assume 4-6 rabbit legs means 4-6 hind legs? I sometimes forget that those downunder are seasonally opposite to me, do rabbits have a season?

I like the idea of steaming a whole rabbit, then easily removing the slightly cooled meat for use in a stew-like dish. This has worked well for small chickens and birds whose anatomy is unfamiliar to me or are simply bone-ridden. And the steaming water has concentrated flavour.

Has anybody done this sort of thing? Maybe a store-bought rabbit is too lean for this approach, one that works better on fatty foods like pork ribs and waterfowl?


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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My personal favorite is to braise it after stuffing the legs with chanterelle mushrooms. I'll usually do some version of a traditional french braise (i.e. mushroom stock & wine & herbs, etc.).


"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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One of the quickest, easiest, and best-tasting ways to cook a rabbit is to fry it just like a chicken. Since the pieces aren't as thick it's a lot easier to get a good crust without the meat being undercooked at the bone. Here's how I do it:

Cut up the rabbit if it's not already cut up.

Season the rabbit pieces with whatever you like--I like Paul Prudhomme's Veal and Pork seasoning, but all it really needs is plenty of salt and pepper.

Heat vegetable oil (enough to half-way cover the rabbit pieces) to the proper temperature--hot enough for a pinch of flour to sizzle lightly, but not burn. If you're using an electric skillet or a frying thermometer 350 degrees is probably the ideal temperature.

Fry until it looks done, turning once.

Drain on paper towels.

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rabbit is one of my favourite meats, but i dont find it is excellent in various ways unlike other animals.

first option is to roast it at very low temperature for a few hours, until it is nice and golden. just lay it flat belly side down. with it prepare a sauce like cream and morels.

second is you take maher's recipe above but i replace the red wine with white, omit the mushrooms and herbs, only onions and garlic. also, no water.

-che

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rabbit is one of my favourite meats, but i dont find it is excellent in various ways unlike other animals.

first option is to roast it at very low temperature for a few hours, until it is nice and golden. just lay it flat belly side down. with it prepare a sauce like cream and morels.

second is you take maher's recipe above but i replace the red wine with white, omit the mushrooms and herbs, only onions and garlic. also, no water.

-che

Thanks Che.

Would you add extra lipid like bacon strips on top or baste with oil? I assume your rabbit is uncovered during the slow roast?

Incidentally, your avatar reminds me (among other things) of how much I used to love a good cigar.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Last time I cooked rabbit, it was as a stew. Easy and good.


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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"I have never tried rabbit. What does it taste like?"

It's good. If you can find it where you live (try a grocery store in a black neighborhood), by all means give it a try. It's cheap (at least where I live--about $5 for a cut-up rabbit) and can be cooked any way you can cook a chicken.


Edited by Harry (log)

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Conduct searches looking for posts by Hathor, especially in the Italian forum, but I think she's posted in the Dinner thread, too. (Andrew Fenton did a cute little wabbit hunt at one point, too, but I am not sure he was happy w its conclusion.)

You do realize this is somewhat twisted. I am surprised no one has referred to your name or the fact that Beatrix Potter's Peter is an eater of lettuce.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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You do realize this is somewhat twisted.  I am surprised no one has referred to your name or the fact that Beatrix Potter's Peter is an eater of lettuce.

I have always thought of myself as more of a "pumpkin eater" although, like Anthony Bourdain's great fear, I will likely return in a future life as an edible mammal.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Well the rabbit wound up getting frozen for a month or so. We roasted him yesterday, whole with cipollini onions, garlic and fennel. The kids liked it. I think it was a little bit dry and overdone. I think I'll chop it up next time as many suggested, thanks again.

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Peter-next time try searching the web or looking in your cookbooks for recipes with rabbit in mustard sauce. That's a classical pairing-the tanginess of mustard against the sweetness of the rabbit meat. I do a braised dish of rabbit with mustard sauce and I add some wild mushrooms, usually morels in season. It's sort of the theory that what 'grows together goes together.' In other words, we shoot little Peter Cottontail in the forest where the morels grow!

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Hi there,

I host an online cooking show called Fearless Cooking. I'm cooking rabbit in a few hours for the first time.

That's actually one of the ideas of the show. I sometimes cook things for the first time on camera, sometimes it's delicious and sometimes not.

I'd love any hints on keeping my rabbit from being too dry. Based on the past eGulllet threads seems like that's a real problem.

Thanks -Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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JimH

Thanks for the great links. The search engine here on eGullet is not so great. I hadn't seen those.

rmillman

Hah! I shoot video for the internet. I can show anything I want! That is the beauty of not being on TV. Anything goes.

That said, I bought two for 3 bucks a pop in Boston over Christmas. They were so cheap i thought I'd just stick them in my suitcase and hope for the best. They were still frozen when I got back to NYC and have been frozen until I defrosted them yesterday. They are skinned, but I'll have to cut them up (on camera).

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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