Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
hzrt8w

Pictorial: Crab in Ginger and Green Onion

Recommended Posts

hzrt8w   

Crab with Ginger and Green Onion (薑蔥蟹)

Dungeness crab is in season. Live crab is on sale for only US$2.49 a pound. Can't miss this opportunity to make some crab dishes at home. Cooking live crab is a little bit of work, but the reward of eating fresh and sweet crab meat is well worth it.

Picture of the finished dish:

gallery_19795_2222_21844.jpg

Serving Suggestion: 2 to 3

Preparations:

The general rule for serving suggestion is 1 crab per person.

gallery_19795_2222_30434.jpg

Main ingredients: (From right to left) 2 live Dungeness crabs, about 3.5 lb. Garlic, about 5 to 6 cloves. Ginger, about 3 inches in length. Green onions, about 10 stalks (small ones).

gallery_19795_2222_5286.jpg

"... You want a piece of me? You want a piece of me??? Come and get it!"

gallery_19795_2222_9117.jpg

Live crabs are dangerous. Their claws can make a painful pinch on your fingers and their legs are pointy. You need to know how to handle them safely. You may want to ask the fish mungers to clean and cut them for you. I like to keep my crabs alive until cooking time.

To hold a live crab safely, you need to grab it from the back so that their claws cannot reach you, as shown in the picture.

gallery_19795_2222_29518.jpg

Where my knife is pointing to is the tail of a crab. After you kill the crab, you need to unroll its tail and break it off.

gallery_19795_2222_24201.jpg

To kill a live crab, point your knife right underneath its mouth. Push the knief in by a few inches. Jiggle it a little bit. (You may need to use the left hand to hold down the crab while operating the knife with your right hand.) Remove the knife. Use your left thumb to poke into the hole cut opened by your knife and hold the crab bottom with the rest of your left palm. Lift it up. Use your right hand to grab the main shell. Tear the shell apart from the rest of its body.

gallery_19795_2222_27345.jpg

There are a few unedible parts (shown with red circles). The 2 circles on each side are the gills. Remove and discard. The lower circle around the mouth are also unedible. Use the knife to break some of the shells and remove the organs. The white curly part (upper small circle) are also some internal organs. Remove and discard. Anything that doesn't look like crab meat, remove and discard. Rinse under running water.

gallery_19795_2222_18442.jpg

If you like to keep the main shell for plating, use a small tooth brush to clean the crab hair underneath the main shell. Be sure you remove and discard the white cloudy substance inside the shell.

gallery_19795_2222_2094.jpg

Cut the crab body into 2 halves right in the middle. Then twist off the claws and legs. Use the knife to cut off the big piece. Use a kitchen mallet or the handle of your cleaver to crack the shells before cooking.

gallery_19795_2222_31421.jpg

Same treatment for the second victim. Prepare the other ingredients: Green onions - trim ends and cut at about 1 inch in length. Ginger: peel and cut into thin slices. Garlic: minced.

Cooking Instructions:

gallery_19795_2222_22055.jpg

First: velvet the crab in hot oil.

Use a pan/wok, set stove at high, add a generous 10 tblsp of cooking/frying oil. Wait until oil start fuming.

gallery_19795_2222_6977.jpg

Use a small bowl and add about 10 tsp of corn starch. Dust the crab meat with corn starch.

gallery_19795_2222_15603.jpg

Place the pieces on the pan and fry the crab pieces for about 3 to 5 minutes.

gallery_19795_2222_343.jpg

Only need to use corn starch to dust the exposed crab meat outside the shell. When done, remove the crab pieces from pan and drain excess oil.

gallery_19795_2222_1789.jpg

I need to cook the crab in 2 batches. I tossed in the 2 crab shells (upside down) to cook. (It's optional. Only if you care to eat it or use it for plating.) Remove from pan when done.

gallery_19795_2222_19426.jpg

Start with a clean wok/pan. Add 3 tblsp of cooking oil. Wait until oil starts fuming. Add minced garlic, sliced ginger and half of the chopped green onions (white portion only). Add 1/2 tsp of salt (or to taste).

gallery_19795_2222_37088.jpg

Dash in 3 tsp of ShaoHsing cooking wine. (Can't go wrong with going heavy on the cooking wine with this dish.) Let it induce a quick flame. Stir well. Cook for 30 seconds.

gallery_19795_2222_16314.jpg

Add 1/2 cup of chicken broth, 3 to 4 tsp of oyster sauce. Stir. Bring the mixture to a boil. Add the remaining portion of the green onions.

gallery_19795_2222_12084.jpg

Use corn starch slurry to thicken the sauce. (Suggest 2 tsp of corn starch dissolved in 2 tsp of water.) Adjust and make the sauce to the right consistency.

gallery_19795_2222_24140.jpg

Return the crab and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes.

gallery_19795_2222_25805.jpg

Stir. Make sure each piece is coated with the sauce.

gallery_19795_2222_21844.jpg

Finished. Transfer to a serving plate.


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful and delicious as usual hzrt8w. It appears that you have "boy" crabs. Could you elaborate on what you leave behind in the main shell? Is the golden brownish substance the crab liver? Any other parts kept? In this part of the USA the blue crab is king/queen and I assume that they're pretty similar inside, am I right?

As for prepping them live, I have to say NO WAY! The only live crabs I prep live are softshells since they're too soft to fight back. :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hrmm... interesting, I've never heard of disassembling a crab raw before. Usually, I will steam them, then rip them apart. Do you find it's easier/harder to do it raw?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dejah   

It's a good idea to leave the rubber bands on the crab claws until after it takes it's last gasp of air... :rolleyes:

Last summer was the first time I'd ever cut up a live crab. One of our elders instructed me to insert a wooden chopstick into its mouth. It's safer than a knife and delivers the same effect. Also, you can use the chopstick, still in its mouth, as a lever to separate the shell from the body.

Another hint is to put the crabs into the freezer for about an hour. This "lulls them to sleep" if you are squeamish (they don't fight back as much).

The idea of dissembling the crab before cooking is to let the flavours get right into the meat as it cooks. It's quicker using pre-cooked crab, but then, I'd want to dip it in garlic butter!

We had a discussing about the "brown stuff" in another thread. Can't recall the name for this. It's my sister's favourite. I ate it for the first time last year and it's good!

Ginger, green onions, garlic and wine are essential in stir-frying crab. I like adding dow cee and Thia chilis to the crab...messy to eat but so good! :wub:

One of our stores will steam the crab or lobster for you while you shop. Dungeness are selling at 4.98/lb. I've been waiting for a quiet evening to have a seafood feast. Tonight might be a good time as our daughter is finished exams. Hooray! She's human again. :laugh:


Edited by Dejah (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*sigh* we really need a drool smiley! Wonderful. Looks delicious. Wish I could get fresh crab here :sad:

Love these home cooking threads. Thanks hzrt8w :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BarbaraY   

Best pictorial I've ever seen on disecting a crab. Thank You.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hzrt8w   
[...]  It appears that you have "boy" crabs.  Could you elaborate on what you leave behind in the main shell?  Is the golden brownish substance the crab liver?  Any other parts kept?  In this part of the USA the blue crab is king/queen and I assume that they're pretty similar inside, am I right?

As for prepping them live, I have to say NO WAY!  The only live crabs I prep live are softshells since they're too soft to fight back. :biggrin:

Thank you, divalasvegas. I was afraid that this question would be brought up. :unsure: I don't know how to tell the "boy" and "girl" crabs apart. It does make sense. The only thing I left behind was the golden brownish/greenish substance. I don't know enough about the anatomy of exoskeletal animals and don't exactly know what it is. Perhaps someone can enlighten us. When I ordered crabs in Chinese restaurants (made the same way), I love to eat this greenish/brownish paste under the shell. When I made this dish the other night, I might have over-velveted the shells. The paste turned very bitter and I ended up not eating much of it.

Handling a live Dungeness is not too hard, actually. Like Dejah said, you can slow them down - putting them to sleep - by putting them in the freezer for an hour before you process them.


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hzrt8w   
Hrmm... interesting, I've never heard of disassembling a crab raw before. Usually, I will steam them, then rip them apart. Do you find it's easier/harder to do it raw?

This is when we Chinese show off our warriorship, Shalmanese! I am only kidding... :biggrin:

Live crabs are not that hard to handle, really. Even when they are putting in their final struggle, we humans always have the upperhand - we have sharp knives. Just grab the crab from the back end so it can't hurt us. To make this Cantonese dish, we don't steam the crabs separately to preserve the flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wesza   

Ah Leung:

You have done it again: This photo recipe is the clearest, best method of cleaning, butchering and preparing Crab that I have ever seen anywhere.

For other readers information: Only Male Dungeness Crabs are permitted to be kept anywhere on the Pacific Coast. The Lady's are allowed freedom to continue seducing vulnerable males who apparently are attracted to every lady they meet so we may all enjoy eating Crab. I sometimes feel sorry for all the Male Crabs that never got lucky, but then I'm only a male. I do justify myself by eating only female Lobsters.

The same method of cleaning and preparing Crab illustrated is applicable to every Crab Species, and I have never seen a Crab that didn't taste good.

Maybe next time Ah Leung will prepare Crab with Black Bean Sauce and Chilli's as it's perfect for the winter when prices are low enough everyone can afford this delicacy.

Irwin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[...]  It appears that you have "boy" crabs.  Could you elaborate on what you leave behind in the main shell?  Is the golden brownish substance the crab liver?  Any other parts kept?  In this part of the USA the blue crab is king/queen and I assume that they're pretty similar inside, am I right?

As for prepping them live, I have to say NO WAY!  The only live crabs I prep live are softshells since they're too soft to fight back. :biggrin:

Thank you, divalasvegas. I was afraid that this question would be brought up. :unsure: I don't know how to tell the "boy" and "girl" crabs apart. It does make sense. The only thing I left behind was the golden brownish/greenish substance. I don't know enough about the anatomy of exoskeletal animals and don't exactly know what it is. Perhaps someone can enlighten us. When I ordered crabs in Chinese restaurants (made the same way), I love to eat this greenish/brownish paste under the shell. When I made this dish the other night, I might have over-velveted the shells. The paste turned very bitter and I ended up not eating much of it.

Handling a live Dungeness is not too hard, actually. Like Dejah said, you can slow them down - putting them to sleep - by putting them in the freezer for an hour before you process them.

Thanks again hzrt8w for your wonderful pics and explanations of your recipes. I'd like to know how to adapt what you've shown us so far to create a crab dish with chili sauce. Anyway the link below shows what I mean by "boy" crab as opposed to "girl" crab. In these parts the part that identifies the male is often called the "monument" after the Washington Monument while the females are called the "Capitol" after our US Capitol. The "gooshy" stuff in the male, at least to my understanding is the liver, while in the female it's the roe. I enjoy eating them both.

Blue Crab Gender Identification

As for the Maryland/Chesapeake Bay blue crabs I grew up with, it's pretty easy to tell them apart. The boys are called "jimmies" and the girls have "aprons" and are called "sallies," at least that's what I was told to call them. I have a friend who lives in the same area as I do but who grew up in North Carolina (poor thing: my family is from Virginia and South Carolina) :biggrin: who has told me on numerous occasions that she and her family would clean live blue crabs before steaming. Again we NEVER did this when I was growing up since blue crabs can be very fiesty, nasty critters and would show your fingers and knuckles no mercy! :shock:

Take care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hzrt8w   

Thank you for the additional information about male/female crabs, divalasvegas and wesza.

After reading that article, it is very obvious that the 2 crabs I bought were both males. And wesza's explanations made a lot of sense. I remember cooking Dungeness crabs bought from San Francisco China Town in the late 80's and remember having crabs with roes in the belly. But not in recent years.

As for chili crabs: I had that dish in Singapore once (along with curry crabs). Both were excellent. I had tried to reproduce chili crabs only once. First prepare the crab and velvet the pieces in oil as depicted in this post. To season: heat up some cooking oil, add lots of minced garlic, a bit of salt. Add minced (or sliced) fresh chili, some Chinese hot chili sauce (a little bit sour based). Dash in cooking wine and a bit of white vinegar. Then add a bit of broth and 1/2 to 1 small can of tomato sauce (depending how dry/wet you want this dish). If needed, thicken the sauce with corn starch slurry. Return the crab pieces and cook for a few more minutes.

Chili crabs are rarely offered in Cantonese restaurants. (Actually I have never seen it on the menus of the Cantonese restaurants that I had visited.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Elsethread on eG is a topic on Licking the Pot, fuggetaboutit! We're talking serious Lick the Screen for this one. It really looks amazing, hzrt8w!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jeniac42   

Wow. Another very impressive pictorial. Now that it's winter break from school and I'll have some free time, I'm going to have to try some of these dishes.

I don't think I'll be trying anything with live crabs, though. I'm afraid of injuring myself, but the real reason is that it just seems like it would be too messy to clean up after such an endeavor in my home kitchen. Sometimes I really miss the giant prep tables we had in the restaurant....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the additional information about male/female crabs, divalasvegas and wesza.

After reading that article, it is very obvious that the 2 crabs I bought were both males. And wesza's explanations made a lot of sense. I remember cooking Dungeness crabs bought from San Francisco China Town in the late 80's and remember having crabs with roes in the belly. But not in recent years.

As for chili crabs: I had that dish in Singapore once (along with curry crabs). Both were excellent. I had tried to reproduce chili crabs only once. First prepare the crab and velvet the pieces in oil as depicted in this post. To season: heat up some cooking oil, add lots of minced garlic, a bit of salt. Add minced (or sliced) fresh chili, some Chinese hot chili sauce (a little bit sour based). Dash in cooking wine and a bit of white vinegar. Then add a bit of broth and 1/2 to 1 small can of tomato sauce (depending how dry/wet you want this dish). If needed, thicken the sauce with corn starch slurry. Return the crab pieces and cook for a few more minutes.

Chili crabs are rarely offered in Cantonese restaurants. (Actually I have never seen it on the menus of the Cantonese restaurants that I had visited.)

Thanks so much for the chili crab recipe hrzt8w. I'll have to try it. I think you mentioned $2.49/lb for Dungeness crabs; what a bargain that would be here. You really made my day! :smile: Well you and the local football team:

Washington 35, Dallas 7.

Yes indeed, today is a very good day :biggrin:


Edited by divalasvegas (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wesza   

Thank you for the additional information about male/female crabs, divalasvegas and wesza.

After reading that article, it is very obvious that the 2 crabs I bought were both males. And wesza's explanations made a lot of sense. I remember cooking Dungeness crabs bought from San Francisco China Town in the late 80's and remember having crabs with roes in the belly. But not in recent years.

As for chili crabs: I had that dish in Singapore once (along with curry crabs). Both were excellent. I had tried to reproduce chili crabs only once. First prepare the crab and velvet the pieces in oil as depicted in this post. To season: heat up some cooking oil, add lots of minced garlic, a bit of salt. Add minced (or sliced) fresh chili, some Chinese hot chili sauce (a little bit sour based). Dash in cooking wine and a bit of white vinegar. Then add a bit of broth and 1/2 to 1 small can of tomato sauce (depending how dry/wet you want this dish). If needed, thicken the sauce with corn starch slurry. Return the crab pieces and cook for a few more minutes.

Chili crabs are rarely offered in Cantonese restaurants. (Actually I have never seen it on the menus of the Cantonese restaurants that I had visited.)

Ah Leung:

Crab with Black Bean Sauce and Chili is almost as popular as Crab with Ginger and Green Onion in the Cantonese restaurants in Hong Kong, Seattle and New York. I have eaten it in San Francisco and LA as well, but not Sacramento.

The "Chili Crab" is a Singapore/Malay specialty that is made by a very different recipe, also very lively and delicious.

Irwin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pan   
[...]Ginger, green onions, garlic and wine are essential in stir-frying crab. I like adding dow cee and Thia chilis to the crab...messy to eat but so good! :wub: [...]

Sue-On, what's dow cee?

Yet another great pictorial, Ah Leung! And I love this dish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rjwong   

dow see is Chinese fermented black beans, used for flavoring, as in dow see pai gwut (steamed pork ribs with black bean sauce).

edited to add: My apologies for stepping in, Pan & Dejah.

FYI Here's one of several discussion threads about Dungeness crab.


Edited by rjwong (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hzrt8w   
Crab with Black Bean Sauce and Chili is almost as popular as Crab with Ginger and Green Onion in the Cantonese restaurants in Hong Kong, Seattle and New York. I have eaten it in San Francisco and LA as well, but not Sacramento.

spaghetttti: Lick the screen... ha ha ha... LOL. Your words made my day!

Irwin: Sorry I have misunderstood you. <<<Smacking my head>>> Of course! Crab with Black Bean Sauce and Chili. I had this at Zen Peninsula in Millbrae for the 8th moon 15th day dinner. Traditionally the Black Bean Sauce dishes in Cantonese cooking are quite saucey. This crab dish, however, is very dry. Almost no sauce at all. Kind of like "dry black bean and chili".

We can make that too. Prepare the crab and velvet the pieces in oil as depicted in the earlier post. (Assume 2 Dungeness crabs.)

To season: Heat up the pan/wok over high heat. Add 3 tblsp of cooking oil. Add 5 to 6 cloves of garlic, minced. 1 to 2 fresh chili, sliced or finely chopped. Grated ginger (or finely chopped), about 1 to 2 inch in length. 1/2 tsp of salt (go heavier on this one). 4 to 5 tsp of fermented black beans - no need to rinse, just crush them. Stir. Dash in 3 tsp of ShaoHsing cooking wine. Add a little bit of chicken broth (not too much, unless you want this dish saucey. If you do so, use corn starch slurry to thicken the sauce.) Return the crab pieces and cook for a few minutes. Ready.


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
muichoi   

Great illustrations! I've always deep-fried the crab, but shallow frying seems much more practical. I usually use bigger crabs, but it's a messy business, the whole thing, best done outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just licked the monitor and the keyboard. Want me to go for the CPU?


Edited by AzianBrewer (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dejah   
dow see is Chinese fermented black beans, used for flavoring, as in dow see pai gwut (steamed pork ribs with black bean sauce).

edited to add: My apologies for stepping in, Pan & Dejah.

FYI Here's one of several discussion threads about Dungeness crab.

Russell,

No need to apologize. That's what so great about the forum: we can all step in to help. :smile:

The page you linked to is very informative. I just copied the "Pan-Roasted Salt & Pepper Crab With Ginger" recipe, and was reminded that the brown stuff we've been talking about is called tomally

Your one post solved two mysteries! :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kiliki   

That was a fantastic tutorial for one of my favorite Chinese restaurant dishes.

My #1 favorite, something I cannot go a week without at one particular restaurant, is called Szechuan crab. It comes plated with a ton of dried red chilis and peanuts (oh, are the peanuts GOOD!), and I can tell there is szechuan peppercorn in the dish. Beyond that, I have always wondered what is in it, and if it is a dish commonly found in other restaurants either in the US or China. Does anyone know anything more about it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If somebody wants my mom's chilli crab recipe, I'll volunteer to take pics and write down the recipe as she makes it--since she makes it by taste--the next time. Which will be soon I hope--I love crab.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hzrt8w   
If somebody wants my mom's chilli crab recipe, I'll volunteer to take pics and write down the recipe as she makes it[...]

miladyinsanity: I would love to see her chili crab recipe. Please take some pictures and share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will, when she cooks it. We have crab on the table when there's crab at the market, and it's the monsoon season, so it's not often. Sad, but true.

May--loves seafood of any kind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By liuzhou
      We are all used to unami now. Maybe it's time to consider gan. Particularly found in teas, but also in other foods. An interesting article from a great magazine.
       
      Going, going gan
    • By liuzhou
      I’m an idiot. It’s official.
       
      A couple of weeks back, on another thread, the subject of celtuce and its leafing tops came up (somewhat off-topic). Someone said that the tops are difficult to find in Asian markets and I replied that I also find the tops difficult to find here in China. Nonsense. They are very easy to find. They just go under a completely different name from the stems – something which had slipped my very slippery mind.
       
      So, here on-topic is some celtuce space.
       
      First, for those who don’t know what celtuce is, let me say it is a variety of lettuce which looks nothing like a lettuce. It is very popular in southern mainland China and Taiwan. It is also known in English as stem lettuce, celery lettuce, asparagus lettuce, or Chinese lettuce. In Chinese it is 莴笋 wō sǔn or 莴苣 wō jù, although the latter can simply mean lettuce of any variety.

      Lactuca sativa var. asparagina is 'celtuce' for the technically minded.
       

       
      Those in the picture are about 40 cm (15.7 inches) long and have a maximum diameter of 5 cm (2 inches). The stems are usually peeled, sliced and used in various stir fries, although they can also be braised, roasted etc. The taste is somewhere between lettuce and celery, hence the name. The texture is more like the latter.
       
      The leafing tops are, as I said, sold separately and under a completely different name. They are 油麦菜 yóu mài cài.
       

       
      These taste similar to Romaine lettuce and can be eaten raw in salads. In Chinese cuisine,  they are usually briefly stir fried with garlic until they wilt and served as a green vegetable – sometimes with oyster sauce.
       
      If you can find either the stems or leaves in your Asian market, I strongly recommend giving them a try.
    • By Duvel
      “… and so it begins!”
       
      Welcome to “Tales from the Fragrant Harbour”!
      In the next couple of days I am hoping to take you to a little excursion to Hong Kong to explore the local food and food culture as well as maybe a little bit more about my personal culinary background. I hope I can give you a good impression of what life is like on this side of the globe and am looking very forward to answering questions, engaging in spirited discussions and just can share a bit of my everyday life with you. Before starting with the regular revealing shots of my fridge’s content and some more information on myself, I’d like to start this blog and a slightly different place.
      For today's night, I ‘d like to report back from Chiba city, close to Tokyo, Japan. It’s my last day of a three day business trip and it’s a special day here in Japan: “Doyou no ushi no hi”. The “midsummer day of the ox”, which is actually one of the earlier (successful) attempts of a clever marketing stunt.  As sales of the traditional winter dish “Unagi” (grilled eel with sweet soy sauce) plummeted in summer, a clever merchant took advantage of the folk tale that food items starting with the letter “U” (like ume = sour plum and uri = gourd) dispel the summer heat, so he introduced “Unagi” as a new dish best enjoyed on this day. It was successful, and even in the supermarkets the sell Unagi-Don and related foods. Of course, I could not resist to take advantage and requested tonight dinner featuring eel. Thnaks to our kind production plant colleagues, I had what I was craving …
      (of course the rest of the food was not half as bad)

      Todays suggestion: Unagi (grilled eel) and the fitting Sake !
       

      For starters: Seeweed (upper left), raw baby mackerel with ginger (upper right) and sea snails. I did not care for the algae, but the little fishes were very tasty.
       

      Sahimi: Sea bream, Tuna and clam ...
       

      Tempura: Shrimp, Okra, Cod and Mioga (young pickled ginger sprouts).
       

      Shioyaki Ayu: salt-grilled river fish. I like this one a lot. I particularly enjoy the fixed shape mimicking the swimming motion. The best was the tail fin
       

      Wagyu: "nuff said ...
       

      Gourd. With a kind of jellied Oden stock. Nice !
       

      Unagi with Sansho (mountain pepper)
       

      So, so good. Rich and fat and sweet and smoky. I could eat a looooot of that ...
       

      Chawan Mushi:steamed egg custard. A bit overcooked. My Japanese hosts very surprised when I told them that I find it to be cooked at to high temperatures (causing the custard to loose it's silkiness), but they agreed.
       

      Part of the experience was of course the Sake. I enjoyed it a lot but whether this is the one to augment the taste of the Unagi I could not tell ...
       

      More Unagi (hey it's only twice per year) ...
       

      Miso soup with clams ...
       

      Tiramisu.
       

      Outside view of the restaurant. Very casual!
      On the way home I enjoyed a local IPA. Craft beer is a big thing in Japan at the moment (as probably anywhere else in the world), so at 29 oC in front of the train station I had this. Very fruity …

       
      When I came back to the hotel, the turn down service had made my bed and placed a little Origami crane on my pillow. You just have to love this attention to detail.

    • By Soul_Venom
      The best Chinese food restaurant I have ever been to is a place called the Imperial Buffet in Aberdeen SD. Their General Tso's is unlike the Tso's anywhere else. The closes comparison I could make is the Orange Chicken at the Panda Garden only 3x better. Their Lo-Mein Noodles are done with the skill of a master Italian pasta chef & perfectly seasoned. They also used to do a mean fried squid. I say used to because they had it when I lived in Aberdeen from 02-04 but didn't when I visited in 15'. One of their other discontinued specialties was a dish advertised as 'Golden Fried Cauliflower'. Note, this was NOT a breaded product. The cauliflower was cooked as though it had been boiled perfectly. It was not greasy as I recall but was a golden orange color as was the sauce it was evidently cooked in. I never could identify the flavors in that sauce. I wish I could describe it better but it has been well over a decade since I had it. Is anyone familiar with it or something similar? I can't seem to find anything like it online & all my searches just bring up links to breaded deep-fried crap.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×