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tan319

White chocolate ganache

95 posts in this topic

I'm looking for one :biggrin:

Most appreciated if you can help.

Thanks!


2317/5000

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Hi, I make mine with a good white chocolate such as Valrhona or Callebaut and use one half the cream that I would use in a dark ganache. One pound of white chocolate and one half pound cream, then I whisk it until it begins to whiten a bit. If you don't whisk it, stays sort of yellowish. Hope this will help you. :smile:


check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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Thanks very much.

I'll have to try this.


2317/5000

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Generally you need to go to a 2:1 ratio for white chocolate. As with dark chocolate ganache a little Karo syrup or invert sugar is good for texture and some butter whisked in at the end improves mouth feel. Are you going for a plain white or something leveraging the neutrality of the white chocolate? White is fun since you can bring out more spice, nut, caqramel, other flavors. The drawback is the sweetness and often the color is less attractive that one might desire. At this time of year I like doing a white chocolate Eggnog Ganache.

Depending on what you will be using the ganache for you may want to go with slightly more or less chocolate to cream, I add nutmeg and a touch of rum, finish with butter. I think its fun as a filling in very intense dark chocolate molded candies.

White chocolate also makes nice pistachio ganache. Best to use the Agrimontana pistachio paste available through Qzina - thin, smooth, intensely green, wonderful nutty pistachio aroma an taste.

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Thanks,chefette.

I'm thinking of trying it for a molten center of a cake.

I do like infusing white chocolate for ice cream or mousses with spices and other things.

Thanks again.


2317/5000

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I've had good luck using 1.5 pounds of white chocolate, 1 cup of cream, and 1 stick butter. This makes for a runnier ganache when melted, but it sets up very well after refrigerated.

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The recipe is here: "White Chocolate Ganache With Tahitian Vanilla Bean."

From the intro to the story on MSNBC.com:

Chocolate is the quintessential Valentine's Day gift. But instead of the usual boxed confection, why not surprise your valentine with a homemade delicacy? Chef Norman Love, who has designed chocolate for Godiva and was the corporate pastry chef at the Ritz Carlton, was invited on "Today" to share his recipe for white chocolate ganache, a sweet creamy chocolate mixture often used as a filling or frosting.

:Clay


Clay Gordon

president, pureorigin

editor/publisher www.chocophile.com

founder, New World Chocolate Society

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Norman Love is one of the best pastry chefs in the biz. I got a chance to work with him at EPCOT a few years back, and a really nice guy to boot!! I can still taste the pistachio ice cream dessert that he made, it was awesome!!!!! Nothing like quenelling for 80.... to order!!

Now I am depressed I missed him on tv....


Tonyy13

Owner, Big Wheel Provisions

tony_adams@mac.com

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Norman Love is one of the best pastry chefs in the biz.  I got a chance to work with him at EPCOT a few years back, and a really nice guy to boot!!  I can still taste the pistachio ice cream dessert that he made, it was awesome!!!!!  Nothing like quenelling for 80.... to order!! 

Now I am depressed I missed him on tv....

Would this ganache work, poured over a chocolate cake? Is it sliceable without cracking?

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If you click on the link in the first message you can watch the clip. You have to deal with an annoying Cadillac ad, but it is short.

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I'm a huge fan of Norman Love! I attended a demo he gave (a few years back) and he really influenced me. I use his methods and recipes for my truffles. Your very lucky Tonyy13, I wish I had had that honor.

His ganche recipes may very well work poured over a cake. He tends to keep his ganches creamy verses a stiff ganche. Give it a try Oli!

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I wanted to watch the video but apparently MSN Video doesn't support Macs. Bastards. :angry:


"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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I have been looking for a good opaque white chocolate glaze to use on some individuals to break up my "dark" ganache desserts. Anyone have a recipe that works? I have tried some purchased white chocolate mirror glaze, not real happy and it costs too much


"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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you can alwyas take some white chocolate chips and melt them down...just a suggestion though u would have to use butter and egg yolks in it to get something liek a ganache.. i can give u a recipe for such

2 egg yolks

1 lb sweet butter

2 pkgs whtie chocolate chips

melt chips over a double boiler. remove and add eg yolks and butter. beat together...

im not sure how opaque it would be though

let me know if this works for you


Edited by ladyyoung98 (log)

a recipe is merely a suggestion

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Bri.....here's one for you!

White Chocolate Ganache with Tahitian Vanilla Bean (or not)

7 ounces heavy whipping cream

1 ounce corn syrup

1 vanilla bean, split (you can also use extract of course, or leave it out altogether)

13 ounces white chocolate

1-1/2 ounces unsalted butter

Combine the cream, corn syrup, and vanilla bean in pan, and bring to a boil. Chop white

chocolate, if not already in small pieces. When liquid boils, pour over chopped white chocolate

and mix to create a smooth ganache. Add the butter, remove vanilla bean if used, and

allow to cool.


Edited by chefpeon (log)

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Ann,

Is the ounces in weight or fluid?


"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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Almost certainly, they all refer to weight.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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The holidays are fast approaching and I'm experimenting with a white chocolate and cranberry ganache enrobed in tempered white chocolate. Could someone help me with the following:

- When I melt the white chocolate with the hot cream, everything turns into a mild yellowy glop! Once the ganache sets, it's not bad but not great tasting.

- While melting my white chocolate for tempering ( for the coating ), all the pieces don't melt and that makes everything a mess when I transfer some of it on a marble slab for agitation!

I really want this to work because when topped with some course red sugar the look is devine! Once again, the finished product tastes alright.

Thank you so very much!

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When I melt the white chocolate with the hot cream, everything turns into a mild yellowy glop! Once the ganache sets, it's not bad but not great tasting.

I'm pretty sure this has to do with melting it over water that is too hot. Flo Braker suggests 120F as the temperature of your water. I have disregarded this info in the past and ended up with the yellow glop you mention. Not so bad when it's in a truffle but really bad if you are planning to coat petit fours with it. :wacko:


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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What type of white chocolate are you using? If you are using "chips" from a grocer, they probably are not chocolate and have palm oil etc. If you are using white chocolate, I've found that I often have to really spend more time blending the chocolate/cream together. Eventually, it does lose that grainy, globby look and pick up a smooth consistency and shine. You may want to emulsify or use a blender on the ganache. Also, maybe chop the chocolate even finer to help it melt better with the cream.

You may want to chop the white chocolate for tempering into even small pieces to see if that helps with the consistency of your tempered chocolate. I even have added cocoa butter to help create a thinner viscosity. Are you heating it too fast? It might be a slower process will melt all the chocolate or you may need to agitate the chocolate while tempering with a dipping fork. That generally helps my chocolate to all melt.

The holidays are fast approaching and I'm experimenting with a white chocolate and cranberry ganache enrobed in tempered white chocolate. Could someone help me with the following:

- When I melt the white chocolate with the hot cream, everything turns into a mild yellowy glop! Once the ganache sets, it's not bad but not great tasting.

- While melting my white chocolate for tempering ( for the coating ), all the pieces don't melt and that makes everything a mess when I transfer some of it on a marble slab for agitation!

I really want this to work because when topped with some course red sugar the look is devine! Once again, the finished product tastes alright.

Thank you so very much!

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What type of white chocolate are you using? 

I use Lindt white couverture.

Thanks a lot!

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The yellowness could be from a number of things

1) overheating, as previously suggested

2) separation of the cocoa butter (it's got a yellow tint)

3) the milk source used (however, lindt typically uses a very good dairy source)

4) aged product - as white chocolate gets older, it gets yellower. also if exposed to light for extended periods of time, it's gonna change color (especially when exposed to florescent lights)

as for the glopping on melting, it's a sure sign that you've either inadvertantly got water in somehow, it's old product (white chocolate is notorious for absorbing ambient moiture from it's environment) or you've overheated it. You may be able to make it easier to work with by adding a drop of fluid lecithin to it and mixing vigorously.

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