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Vietnamese Food


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Served 'com tam' today but without the usual shredded pork skin (too dry for my liking). It was simply broken rice, sunny side up, grilled marinated pork chops and sliced tomatoes & cucumbers. The final touch was, of course, nuoc mam.

this looks so unbelievably cozy and delicious, you have no idea. there are no places serving any broken rice plates around here. have to make my own.

thanks for posting this

Aww thanks for giving me that warm fuzzy feeling :wub:

I've been craving so much for Vietnamese meatballs (nem nuong) lately...

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

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  • 2 weeks later...

Chicken stir-fried with lemongrass and chile (ga xao xa ot), from Into the Vietnamese Kitchen. Deboned chicken thigh chunks, marinated with curry powder, salt, and sugar, browned with red bell pepper, shallots, lemongrass, and chiles, and then simmered with a little coconut milk.

Stir-fried broccolini with shiitake mushrooms: glazed with oyster sauce, soy sauce, Shaoxing rice wine, sugar, sesame oil, and vegetable stock. Recipe adapted from Vegetables Everyday, so not specifically Vietnamese.

Jasmine rice, sliced cucumbers, and chopped cilantro at the table.

Edit: forgot red bell pepper

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Edited by C. sapidus (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I would love other's impressions and experiences with banh da. I purchased the one with black sesame seeds. The ingredient list says it is wheat flour but everything I read on line confirms the taste which is rice flour. I put a half round into the microwave and ended up with this extra terrestrial looking wonderfully crunchy puff which I used to sop up and scoop up a soupy stir fry. How does this happen? Uses? Does the one with white sesame seeds and shrimp bits behave the same? I am entranced with the possibilities. Unfortunately can not post photos at this time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry hedi, I've never heard of banh da before. Is it like a huge rice cracker?

My Vietnamese beef in vinegar fondue dinner!

This is essential despite it's uhh 'aroma'. It's fermented anchovy dip and according to the label, the ingredients include anchovy fish, chilli, salt, garlic vinegar and sugar. To make it more sauce-y (and to balance the flavour for a bit of sweetness and less of the pungency), I mixed the dip with mashed pineapples (from a can), a little syrup and some sugar.

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Gotta have the herbs and greens if you're eating Vietnamese.

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Dad dipping a thin slice of raw beef into the vinegar fondue.

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My plate -ready to roll!

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God I love the smelly sauce!

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Just another food porn shot.

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Edited by Ce'nedra (log)

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

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Sorry hedi, I've never heard of banh da before. Is it like a huge rice cracker?

My Vietnamese beef in vinegar fondue dinner!

Yes Ce'nedra- it ends up looking like a giant rice cracker. In the package it looks like a really thick rice paper including those basket markings. I have seen with with white or black sesame seeds, and also with dried shrimp.

Your beef in vinegar fondue looks outstanding. I have everything but the sauce of course. I will improvise with Vietnamese shrimp sauce and fresh pineapple.

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Sorry hedi, I've never heard of banh da before. Is it like a huge rice cracker?

My Vietnamese beef in vinegar fondue dinner!

Yes Ce'nedra- it ends up looking like a giant rice cracker. In the package it looks like a really thick rice paper including those basket markings. I have seen with with white or black sesame seeds, and also with dried shrimp.

Your beef in vinegar fondue looks outstanding. I have everything but the sauce of course. I will improvise with Vietnamese shrimp sauce and fresh pineapple.

Thanks heidi :biggrin:

As for the giant rice cracker, I don't know too much about it as I don't eat it on a regular basis but I do know that it's often served with Vietnamese salads (goi if I'm not mistaken). It's particularly good slightly dampened with nuoc cham.

At times, I've eaten it with congee served with a Vietnamese chicken/duck salad with a nuoc cham dressing. What I'd do is break off a bit of the cracker, scoop some of the salad (and sauce) on it, put into my mouth while smiling, and finally, take a mouthful of the burning congee.

Really amazing combo.

Otherwise, I just eat those crackers alone as a snack if it's somewhere around the home.

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P.S. I think it's probably a better idea, if you're going to substutute the fermented anchovy sauce, with nuoc cham (mixed in with something else) as the taste of shrimp sauce is really quite different.

Maybe others can offer some ideas? I'm no expert hah.

Do you have any Asian/Vietnamese groceries nearby? I'm sure they should stock this.

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P.S. I think it's probably a better idea, if you're going to substutute the fermented anchovy sauce, with nuoc cham (mixed in with something else) as the taste of shrimp sauce is really quite different.

Maybe others can offer some ideas? I'm no expert hah.

Do you have any Asian/Vietnamese groceries nearby? I'm sure they should stock this.

It is only a 20 minute drive to lots of sources, but I wanted it for dinner that night. I did find a "from scratch" recipe in an older Vietnamese cookbook ("The Classic Cuisine of Vietnam" by Bach Ngo & Gloria Zimmerman with forward by Jacques Pepin). It was published in 1979 when such ingredients were not readily available. To paraphrase in case anyone is interested: 2 cloves garlic, 2 T sugar, a fresh chili, 2 oz. can flat anchovies including the oil, a T of fish sauce, juice of 1/2 lime and a T of water. Great minds must think alike because I did end up just using nuoc cham with some added grated ginger and served the pineapple along with the greens to be rolled up. I will pick up some of the sauce on my next trip to the Vietnamese market.

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  • 3 weeks later...

We have made both of these before: Napa cabbage and shrimp soup (canh cai kim chi nau tom) and garlicky oven-roasted chicken (ga ro-ti). The soup recipe calls for flavoring the broth with sauteed onion, fish sauce, and dried shrimp. We simmered shrimp shells in the broth, which added a nice overlay of fresh shrimp flavor.

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  • 3 weeks later...

These are Vietnamese-style waffles known as Banh Kep La Dua. If anyone's wondering why the waffles have a strange green hue and are wiping their monitor screens, don't. These are pandan waffles :raz:

Did it cheat's way with a box of pancake mix, rice flour, eggs, water (can be replaced with milk but dad's lactose intolerant though he's consumed some dairy products before hmm), sugar and pandan essence.

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  • 1 month later...

Gia Vi Do (without appropriate accents)

I bought a package of Herbal Mix. at the top is says (without accents)

Gia Vi Do Bo Tong Hop. the ingredients are:

Radix Astragli

Rhyzoma Polygonati

Dioscorea

Dried Date

Fructus Litchii

Radix Adenophorae

the package weighs 2.5 oz and on the back it says serving size 1/2 cup, servings per container about 3.

can someone provide me with appropriate instructions?

I think these ingredients are for a stew of some kind. any help will be greatly appreciated. if required, I can try to provide a link to a jpg of the package which also has Chinese characters.

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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  • 3 weeks later...

A strong contender for the best stew I have ever eaten: thit bo kho (beef stew with star anise and basil) from Pleasures of the Vietnamese Table. Annato oil, fish sauce, and soy sauce provided color, and the come-hither aromas of frying garlic and shallots, browning beef, and simmering lemongrass, curry powder, and freshly-toasted and ground star anise filled the kitchen. Adding garlic, shallots, and basil in stages layered the flavors nicely, and the garnish of Thai basil, cilantro, and thinly-sliced onion added a fresh, aromatic punch.

Mrs. C sauteed Portobello mushrooms with red wine and thyme, earning a score of nine from both boys. Served with jasmine rice, green salad, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

Thit bo kho

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That stew is really excellent if you use a bit of baguette to soak up the juices - just sayin'. If you've got any leftover, consider that for breakfast!  :raz:

Baguette! *slaps forehead* No leftovers, but I do have a breakfast-sized container of rice, mushrooms, and a smidgeon of thit bo kho juice stashed in the fridge.

That looks lovely! I bow down to your vast knowledge of Asian cuisines c. sapidus. Amazing!

Whew, thanks, OnigiriFB, but you give too much credit. Most of the time I’m just following a recipe.

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  • 3 weeks later...
A strong contender for the best stew I have ever eaten: thit bo kho (beef stew with star anise and basil) from Pleasures of the Vietnamese Table.

??? when looking for recipes I find that "thit bo kho" also refers to Grilled Dried Beef ???

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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C. sapidus: Your 'thit kho' looks sooooo good! I often have this with baguettes, as nakji wisely suggested.

Other times, we have a soup-ier version served with rice noodles. Excellent either way (really depends on your mood -to mop or to slurp).

dmreed: Perhaps trying to search for it with the proper accented words. It might change the meaning around -just a suggestion :)

I'm aware that some Vietnamese words with different meanings are spelt exactly the same, if the accents are ignored. Just trying to sound more knowledgeable than I am ha.

Dinner was spring rolls served with vermicelli, lettuce, cucumbers, bean sprouts, herbs and pickled carrots. Oh and of course with nuoc cham.

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C. sapidus' Thit Bo Kho looks great [hope you used a beef cut with tendon]. this version is eaten exclusively with baguette to mop up the rich delicious sauce.

the soupy version is called Bun Bo Kho, which is slightly different in taste. to confuse one further, there's something else called Pho Bo Kho. aiiiiiii! i suspect it's the same thing.

i love how so many things in VN come with a humongous tray of fresh herbs and leaves. makes me feel like a rabbit.

has anyone ever heard of Bun Bo Cay? a southern speciality similar to Thit Bo Kho but simpler, apparently. and spicy! lime juice, pounded fresh chilies, roasted ground chili and garlic enhance the broth.

dmreed, grilled dried beef i think it's probably beef jerky. not sure if it's actually grilled though.

Ce'nedra's dinner, is it homemade? looks more authentic than the same thing they sell here in my food hell.

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Those look fantastic, Ce'nedra.

They make me want to go get some Vietnamese, but I'm running low on funds, so that's a bad idea.  So thanks for that...

Asian food tends to be much cheaper and healthier if you already have the basics. I know that my asian market has fresh veggies and rice for a lot cheaper than the grocery or even walmart. I can get two weeks worth of groceries at the asian market that would only last me a week from the regular market. Then again it depends on how you eat... I rarely buy processed foods so that helps.

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Those look fantastic, Ce'nedra.

They make me want to go get some Vietnamese, but I'm running low on funds, so that's a bad idea.  So thanks for that...

Asian food tends to be much cheaper and healthier if you already have the basics. I know that my asian market has fresh veggies and rice for a lot cheaper than the grocery or even walmart. I can get two weeks worth of groceries at the asian market that would only last me a week from the regular market. Then again it depends on how you eat... I rarely buy processed foods so that helps.

I agree. Actually, I find Vietnamese to be (generally anyway) fairly cheap. That certainly doesn't take away any of the taste factor though :raz:

Ce'nedra's dinner, is it homemade?  looks more authentic than the same thing they sell here in my food hell.

Sure is. Except...I can't take credit for the spring roll stuffing (mum did that).

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Those look fantastic, Ce'nedra.

They make me want to go get some Vietnamese, but I'm running low on funds, so that's a bad idea.  So thanks for that...

Asian food tends to be much cheaper and healthier if you already have the basics. I know that my asian market has fresh veggies and rice for a lot cheaper than the grocery or even walmart. I can get two weeks worth of groceries at the asian market that would only last me a week from the regular market. Then again it depends on how you eat... I rarely buy processed foods so that helps.

I agree. Actually, I find Vietnamese to be (generally anyway) fairly cheap. That certainly doesn't take away any of the taste factor though :raz:

I have most of the basics. I just wanted to get a nice hot bowl of pho. It's ok now though. I did it anyway, against better judgment.

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