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Vietnamese Food


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Wow, this looks very tasty, what are the orange balls? Unlaid chicken eggs?

Hu tieu! Simple, comfort food. I love the clean and subtly sweet taste (the broth) of this noodle soup -sometimes you're really just not in the mood for something too strongly flavoured.

3359883166_16dbb8f940_o.jpg

3359883168_fe93a026db_o.jpg

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Wow, this looks very tasty, what are the orange balls?  Unlaid chicken eggs?

Yep. I loooove the texture -has a bite to it.

do you mean unlaid yolks?

if so, where do you get them?

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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Wow, this looks very tasty, what are the orange balls?  Unlaid chicken eggs?

Yep. I loooove the texture -has a bite to it.

do you mean unlaid yolks?

if so, where do you get them?

dmreed, these are unlaid eggs. As for getting them, it depends where you are. Basically, you can get them at any butcher or store that sells and kills (dress) live chicken. You can request for the unlaid eggs and other offal/innards that you want (hearts, intestines, liver, etc).

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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  • 2 weeks later...

Domestic Goddess answered right :)

Anyone know what 'Nem tai bà Hồng' is exactly?

(found pictures on Vietnamese food forum -judging by the forum's name, I'd assume it's Northern Vietnamese)

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c222/bla...MG_1317_640.jpg

I find the food of the north very intriguing; it's so unfamiliar and 'exotic' to me. Have a look at the link and scroll through

http://www.hanoicorner.com/phpBB2/viewtopi...er=asc&start=96

Many of the dishes I never knew existed! What's the bottom one with meats and what appears to be green mangoes, sauces (what kind?) and various other stuff?

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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  • 1 month later...

Some friends and I went to the International Hmong Marketplace yesterday.

One of my purchases was a plastic bag containing this:

gallery_6263_35_103693.jpg.

Near as I could tell (my Thai is rusty, my Hmong or Laotion language skills are next to nothing) they mentioned "chicken" but I could be wrong. These herbs and lemon grass were all bundled together so I figure they are for cooking -- as in stewing or brothing.

Help!

Edited to correct a link.

Edited by snowangel (log)
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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One of my purchases was a plastic bag containing this:

Susan, any luck identifying the herbs? And more to the point, what did you do with them? :smile:

Chicken stir-fried with lemongrass and chile: I haven’t made this since the foodblog, but I love the technique of stir-frying with aromatics, spices, chiles, and a small amount of coconut milk until the liquid reduces to a glaze. Served with jasmine rice.

gallery_42956_2536_48247.jpg

Napa cabbage and fish soup. Both dishes from (or adapted from) Into the Vietnamese Kitchen.

gallery_42956_2536_20780.jpg

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I did some sleuthing through my Laos pictures, Susan, and found these:

gallery_41378_3106_45106.jpg

Here's the local market in Sam Neua. In the bottom basket, you can see the long purple-stemmed leaves for sale, located near the lettuce vendors.

Then, in this picture:

gallery_41378_3106_100276.jpg

I have another basket of herbs I'm tearing up for bus-station pho - including lettuce. I'm willing to bet - whatever they are - you can use them as an herbal garnish for soup or salad, or to wrap meat.

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  • 2 weeks later...
One of my purchases was a plastic bag containing this:

Susan, any luck identifying the herbs? And more to the point, what did you do with them? :smile:

Chicken stir-fried with lemongrass and chile: I haven’t made this since the foodblog, but I love the technique of stir-frying with aromatics, spices, chiles, and a small amount of coconut milk until the liquid reduces to a glaze. Served with jasmine rice.

gallery_42956_2536_48247.jpg

Napa cabbage and fish soup. Both dishes from (or adapted from) Into the Vietnamese Kitchen.

gallery_42956_2536_20780.jpg

these dishes look appetizing, do you have or can you provide links to the recipes?

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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these dishes look appetizing, do you have or can you provide links to the recipes?

Thanks! Both recipes are from Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, which I recommend highly.

Chicken stir-fried with lemongrass and chile

Napa cabbage and shrimp soup

Enjoy!

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these dishes look appetizing, do you have or can you provide links to the recipes?

Thanks! Both recipes are from Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, which I recommend highly.

Chicken stir-fried with lemongrass and chile

Napa cabbage and shrimp soup

Enjoy!

thanks, I have the book and I will look at it again!

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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Bruce,

Thanks very much for bringing attention to this recipe. Since Ms. Nguyen sometimes contributes her precious time and gifts here, I would love to learn her honored mother's longer oven-finished version. One reason is to maintain a link with the past, to preserve a small fragment of cultural history.

The second is that sometimes having an oven-cooked dish is a blessing in a busy household or when guests are due. One may concentrate on a soup and a stir-fry veg on the stove, secure in the knowledge that the main dish is beautifully finishing itself off without any fuss.

Entirely by accident, needing to cook chicken red curry for a huge number of students, I ''invented" an oven-finish method using a turkey roaster that pleased their non-discrimating tastes well enough and was not bad taken on its own merits, not necessarily Dave Thompson's! Therefore, am very keen on learning more about similar techniques used with S.E. Asian cooking.

I do hope Ms. Ngyen might pop in one day with that version, and any more "long versions" that she had to change for her book. We woud love to try both and compare.

Thanks.

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I'm pretty excited for Andrea's upcoming Dumplings cookbook.

But back on topic, my new love is a tamarind dipping sauce mmm...

recipe?

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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I'm pretty excited for Andrea's upcoming Dumplings cookbook.

But back on topic, my new love is a tamarind dipping sauce mmm...

recipe?

No exact measurements here. Taste as you go -tamarind pulp mashed in hot (just boiled) water, remove seeds then add palm sugar, fish sauce and bruised garlic & chilli. Mix. My mum prefers to remove the pulp afterwards ("more pleasing to the eyes") but I much prefer to leave it in since I love all that tangy-ness. To my eyes, it also appears like what I refer to as a "party of flavours"

Edit: tastes gorgeous with simply fried or baked fish.

Edited by Ce'nedra (log)

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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You have re-discovered the ur-Pad Thai sauce/flavor!! Fantastic good taste on your part!

HOLYYYY! Why did that NEVER occur to me?! :shock:

Thanks for the heads up -now I may consider using that sauce for homemade pad thai! Strangely, I've failed at cooking pad thai each time. Forget the mushy noodles, the sauce never quite tastes right. Perhaps it's the lime...I really don't know what I did wrong although I am pretty darn sure I didn't use the sauce above. At least not exactly.

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Grilled chicken thighs (ga nuong) marinated with lime juice, fish sauce, black pepper, garlic, sugar, and oil. Asparagus and shiitake mushroom stir-fry (mang tay xao nam huong), jasmine rice, and nuoc cham dipping sauce. I grilled the chicken until nearly done over medium heat, and then finished over high heat to crisp the skin.

gallery_42956_2536_60686.jpg

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Hu tieu! Simple, comfort food. I love the clean and subtly sweet taste (the broth) of this noodle soup -sometimes you're really just not in the mood for something too strongly flavoured.

3359883166_16dbb8f940_o.jpg

3359883168_fe93a026db_o.jpg

I was in a couple of Asian markets this weekend and am wondering if what I saw was the same as your unlaid chicken eggs. They looked exactly like the ones in your soup, and came in shrink-wrapped packages of a dozen each, but they were not refrigerated. If they weren't unlaid eggs, what were they?

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  • 1 month later...
http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category...337321kNbY8CeZ#

I saw in this video a method of cooking Thit Kho Dua Gia with a six pack of sweet soda, not cola. I should be most grateful if someone with Viet language could please translate what the nearest equivalent would be. Thanks much.

It's probably Coco Rico soda

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  • 1 month later...

Bravo. Beautiful photo and recipe. Now there is one question I have. I asked that question to my stepfather who was originated from Hue, but his answers always change.

I always considered Raum Ram as the inseparable from Bun Bo Hue. In your recipe which seem very traditional, you don't mention it.

So my question is this : Is Rau Ram served with Bun Bo Hue in Hue or not ? Is it a late addition from south vietnamese people who appear to like this herb very much ?

Give me your opinion.

I join to my post my own recipe (quite similar to yours) for Bun Bo Hue

BUN BO HUE RECIPE

=============

bun_no_hue_closeup.jpg

So there it is, the recipe for 10 bowls of this magnificent Bún Bò Huế (genuine accentuation there) soup.

Ingrédients

500 grams of pork hocks cut in 8 pieces

2 pig's feet (ask your butcher to give you the front feets since they are thiner, and to cut into 6 pieces. I remember I once seriously damaged one of my favorite kitchen knife in trying to cut a pig's feet)

1 kg of beef brisket boneless

8 stalks lemongrass

4 tbs (tablespoons) of Mam Rước (shrimp paste, brown-violet colored with the consistency of a thick cream)

4 tsp (teaspoon) Bun Bo Hue spices, which can be found in asian products stores. It is mainly chili, garlic and seeds of red annetto. A few months ago, this product was removed from the shelfs in France, and therefore I explain below how to replace this ingredient.

2 garlic cloves

4 large onions

1 cinnamon stick (3 inches long and one thick)

4 shallots

Rice vermicelli fresh or dried. These are thick rice vermicelli, not the thin ones

2 tasteful tomatoes

for serving

Rau Ram leaves (pronounce Rao ram) or polygonum (latin nickname). This is a crucial ingredient, and so is the freshness of the leaves.

Eventually banana flowers, cut into thin strips(This is lao influence, and shall not be considered in the traditional line)

White Onions

black grounded pepper

Nuoc Mam

Lime

Fresh red and green small peppers thinly minced

Notice that Thai basil, coriander, mint leaves are not listed there since they don't really match with Rau Ram.

Rau Ram leaves or Polygonum

This leaves are often used in Hue's cuisine. It is used in salad (delicious Ga Xe Phay, Jack fruit salad, and sometimes Banh Xeo). You can keep it in the fridge for about a week, but the easiest way is to reuse the stems from which you removed the leaves and allow it to develop roots in a glass of water on the balcony. Later, you can move the stems in gardening soil. The whole process doesn't take more than two weeks.

Directions

Crush the cloves of garlic,

Chop the shallots.

Chop finely 3 stalks of lemongrass

Cut the beef brisket into slices 5mm thick, 5 cm long et 2 cm wide. Place the beef in a bowl with these ingredients, and add two tbs of peanut oil.

Add salt and pepper, add 2 tbs of nuoc mam, mix, knead and marinate for two hours.

Boil 5 liters of water in a large soup pot.

Once the water boils, reduce the heat in order to obtain a gentle boiling. This is important in order to preserve the broth clarity. Add the pig's feet and the pieces of pork's hocks. Add the coarse salt and allow to boil gently for two hours while continously removing the foam the broth will produce.

Put two tbs of peanut oil in a cast iron casserole. When oil is hot, add the two tsp of Bun Bo Hue spices, which will turn brown within seconds. Keeping the heat high, add the marinated beef meat. Stir constantly, and when the meat is well colored, add the tomatoes cut in pieces. Continue to stir until the tomatoes have completely melted in the pan (about ten minutes).

Update: This famous blend of Bun Bo Hue spices (Oriental Flavour Mixed Chili Gia Vi Bun Bo Hue) has become impossible to find in French Asian stores recently. I finally had the explanation: I don't know about the US market, but in France, the distributor lost its marketing authorization for this product (what the hell did they put in it). But fortunately the parade is very simple since annetto seeds can still be found in France. Heat 3 tbs of peanuts oil in a pan and when the oil is hot, add 3 tbs of red annetto seeds, and a tsp of dried peppers. When the oil turns orange, add a ladle of broth in the pan, filter back to the main pot, discarding the seeds.

Notice that if you want to degrease the broth (my guess, if you are on a diet, simply avoid Bun Bo Hue), you need to do it before this stage, since each spoon of fat you discard will also take away from the broth, some of its essence.

Next, put 3 ladles of the broth in a bowl and dissolve 4 tbs of Mam rước into it, stirring constantly until the complete dissolution of the paste. You can then add the content of the bowl back to the main pot.

crush four stalks of lemongrass using a pastry roll and cut into 10 cm long sections. Add to the pot.

Cut onions in four and put them on a dish, and under the grill in the oven. Allow them to grill until their skin turns brown. You can also use a pan to do this, adding a little peanut oil and stirring occasionally. When the onions have turned brown, add them to the main pot. These grilled onions will slightly sweeten the broth.

Then add the cinnamon stick, 10 tbsp of nuoc mam, salt and pepper. Taste the broth and add Nuoc Mam or salt to match your taste.

Leave the pot uncovered over medium heat (gently boiling) for 2 1/2 hours and thirty.

After 2 1/2 hours, remove the pig's feets, the beef and the pork's shank and allow it to cool in the fridge (it will be easer to cut). Remove from heat and let the broth to cool until dinner time. Ideally, you can let the broth rest for one our two hours.

Meanwhile, boil a large quantity of water (enough for the vermicelli to grow during cooking in a clear water. If you don't use enough water, then the noodles will be too sticky and the temperature of the water will drop suddenly as you introduce the noodles.

Wash the herbs, detach the leaves from the Raum Ram stems, slice young onions, minced the pepper and crush it gently with a spoon.

When the water is boiling add a tbsp of oil from the broth and one tsp of salt. Add the noodles. Dried noodles takes 15 minutes to be al dente. Rinse vermicelli under cold water to stop the cooking process and drain.

When the meat is cold, its become firmer and easier to cut. Slice the pork's hock, the beef brisket being already sliced down.

Serving

In each bowl, place the noodles, beef, a few slices of shank and a foot piece of pork. Then pour the broth through a sieve until the meat is covered. Drain the content of the bowl returning the broth to the main pot, to warm up the noodles and meat.

Place on top of the meat minced Rau Ram, white onion (which should not touch the broth), et piece of lime et Add in a little bowl of onion white, Rau Ram, a piece of lime, and little fresh grounded pepper using a pepper mill. Serve immediately.

This soup is a bit heavy in the stomach, and I sometimes make a lighter version, by throwing the first broth, degrease thoroughly the broth, removing the pork's hocks or using only one pig's feet.

Anyway, it doesn't looks like me, I like fat. Let's be generous.

It might sound odd at first, but this soup goes along very well with a glass of red wine. Personaly, I likely taste a powerful and tannic wine such as Cahors. No need to take an expensive though. Saint Chinian for the summer is not too bad, we can serve a fresher.

The recipe on my blog :

http://khas-kitchen.blogspot.com/2009/06/b...celles-aux.html

Oh, I am sorry to not include a recipe. I wasn't sure of the interest level in learning something like this. Here is the recipe. Let me know if you are not clear on any ingredient.

1 lb ham hocks

6 stalks lemongrass, crushed and sliced thin

2 tablespoons fish sauce

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon sea salt

2 teaspoon of mam ruoc (shrimp paste)

1 teaspoon black pepper

4 ounces boneless sirloin

4 ounces boneless pork loin

16 ounces rice noodles, cooked

1 cup bean sprouts

4 sprigs Thai holy basil (regular basil ok)

4 sprigs fresh mint

4 sprigs fresh cilantro

4 teaspoons sambal oelek or hot chili sauce

4-8 fresh Thai red chili peppers (amount optional)

1 lime, cut into quarters

Bring 2 1/2 quarts

water to a boil; add ham hocks and lemongrass.

Skim constantly for 10 minutes then cover the pan, reduce heat and simmer for

1 1/2-2 hours.

Strain the broth, reserving ham hocks if you desire them.

Delute the shrimp paste in 1/4 cup of cold water and set aside for 10 minutes

Add nuoc mam,shrimp paste solution, sugar, salt and pepper, sirloin, and pork loin to the broth and

simmer for 10-15 minutes or until meat is cooked and tender; remove meat.

Thinly slice meats into small pieces.

To serve, place a portion of noodles in serving bowl, top with some bean sprouts,

pork, beef, and some ham hock (if using), and ladle the broth over; add herbs,

chili sauce, chilies, and lime juice to taste.

Edited by kha (log)

Kha Tran - Paris - France

I love cooking, love eating. My very personal taste drives me towards personal interpretation of traditional dishes in Lao, vietnamese, Thai and French cuisine. I am looking for world wide confrontation of techniques, ingredients and recipes. All feedback are welcome.<br />

<a href='http://khas-kitchen.blogspot.com' target='_blank'>http://khas-kitchen.blogspot.com</a>

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