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Louisa Chu

Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Seasons 1-5

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I enjoyed the pig killing scene quite a bit.  As someone who advocates the meat 'lifestyle' I wonder if that really was the first mammal TB has killed?  If so, its high time he had that experience, considering the 1000s++ he has served as dinner!

I found his faux-guilt amusing too.

But he's not serving all that meat he cooks to himself. Somewhere along the line it became civilized to not have to slaughter your own meat in case you haven't noticed.

I hate how somewhere along the line Tony and lots of other chefs become the sounding board for all the pissed off vegetarians who have worn out the ears of all their meat consuming friends and family so go for the next likely target. Somehow the butcher doesn't pay nearly as much hell for it, or the farmer, or the corporations who anonamously push meat. It not the fault of the chef for peoples choices, on the flipside however it's laudable when chefs come out in support for healthy eating as well as good mental practises, like meat eaters having the experience of taking a life. Now, this was the best show yet, esp. because much of the food that he ate seemed to please him greatly, well maybe not the fermented shrimp paste on toast. He also went out of his way to get their tribal tatoo, yeah it looked cool, but has that been done on a travel show before?

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I enjoyed the pig killing scene quite a bit.  As someone who advocates the meat 'lifestyle' I wonder if that really was the first mammal TB has killed?  If so, its high time he had that experience, considering the 1000s++ he has served as dinner!

I found his faux-guilt amusing too.

But he's not serving all that meat he cooks to himself. Somewhere along the line it became civilized to not have to slaughter your own meat in case you haven't noticed.

I hate how somewhere along the line Tony and lots of other chefs become the sounding board for all the pissed off vegetarians who have worn out the ears of all their meat consuming friends and family so go for the next likely target. Somehow the butcher doesn't pay nearly as much hell for it, or the farmer, or the corporations who anonamously push meat. It not the fault of the chef for peoples choices, on the flipside however it's laudable when chefs come out in support for healthy eating as well as good mental practises, like meat eaters having the experience of taking a life. Now, this was the best show yet, esp. because much of the food that he ate seemed to please him greatly, well maybe not the fermented shrimp paste on toast. He also went out of his way to get their tribal tatoo, yeah it looked cool, but has that been done on a travel show before?

Just so happens that on the Zadi family farm in Setif we have about 100 sheep. I'd love to see Tony taking them up to the mountains to graze. We slaughter one about once a week. For a ten day feast we kill one a day. And yes, I've slaughtered lamb and cooked every edible bit from nose to tail.

I can show him how to make camel confit too.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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My ideas for No Res locations:

-- Korea. When Tony was in NJ it was obvious he was largely unfamiliar with Korean food. It's one of the most underrated cusines, and Korea is a fascinating place, so it might make a great show.

-- Hawaii. Not tourist Hawaii, but the real local stuff that tourists don't see. The folks on our local Hawaii board could provide a lot of material.

-- New Zealand.


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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-- Korea. When Tony was in NJ it was obvious he was largely unfamiliar with Korean food. It's one of the most underrated cusines, and Korea is a fascinating place, so it might make a great show.

I totally second that. Most folks either expect Korea to be a Japan part II (which it totally isn't) or a land of dog eaters. It would be cool for people to learn to appreciate Korea for what it is, and for what it has to offer rather than all of the stereotypes.


Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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-- Korea. When Tony was in NJ it was obvious he was largely unfamiliar with Korean food. It's one of the most underrated cusines, and Korea is a fascinating place, so it might make a great show.

I totally second that. Most folks either expect Korea to be a Japan part II (which it totally isn't) or a land of dog eaters. It would be cool for people to learn to appreciate Korea for what it is, and for what it has to offer rather than all of the stereotypes.

I'll third that. I lived in Korea for three years. I learned to love the food and the more I got to know the cuisine, the stereotypes I had of "Asian" foods were shattered. There are wonderfully delicate preparations in Korean cooking as well.

One of my memorable meals was at an open air restaurant that served duck and you got to choose your own duck from a pond. The duck was thinly sliced and grilled over charcoal with all different herbs, greens and sauces. They made a rich soup from the bones with wild sesame seeds added.

Seoul has a night life like no other. It's a nonstop city.

I don't eat pork obviously. But when BIL got married they did a whole pig roast in a pit.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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-- Korea. When Tony was in NJ it was obvious he was largely unfamiliar with Korean food. It's one of the most underrated cusines, and Korea is a fascinating place, so it might make a great show.

I totally second that. Most folks either expect Korea to be a Japan part II (which it totally isn't) or a land of dog eaters. It would be cool for people to learn to appreciate Korea for what it is, and for what it has to offer rather than all of the stereotypes.

To me the difference between the Northern and Southern foods is pretty interesting, but then again the North Korean food I've had has been right here in the U.S. Might be a bit harder to get in South Korea.

Also, there are some good segments to be had on making (and drinking) Soju. Tony would get his chance to use the phrase "rocket fuel" in earnest again.


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Actually Soju (Wikipedia entry) isn't nearly as strong as some of the folk liquors (read: moonshine) that come out of China or Vietnam. Most of the stronger Sojus are only around 25 percent alcohol, but there are some special ones that can come close to 45 percent (90 proof). Still, drink enough of it and you can get really plastered.

The best Sojus in Korea are produced in Andong province. Recently only a few of these have been imported into the US. They are about 3 times as expensive as the regular Jinro or Doosan stuff, but they are well worth it in my opinion.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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-- Korea. When Tony was in NJ it was obvious he was largely unfamiliar with Korean food. It's one of the most underrated cusines, and Korea is a fascinating place, so it might make a great show.

I totally second that. Most folks either expect Korea to be a Japan part II (which it totally isn't) or a land of dog eaters. It would be cool for people to learn to appreciate Korea for what it is, and for what it has to offer rather than all of the stereotypes.

To me the difference between the Northern and Southern foods is pretty interesting, but then again the North Korean food I've had has been right here in the U.S. Might be a bit harder to get in South Korea.

Also, there are some good segments to be had on making (and drinking) Soju. Tony would get his chance to use the phrase "rocket fuel" in earnest again.

The reigning North Korean specialty is neng myun.

The culinary heart of Korea is jeonju in jeolla do province. Just so happens my wife's family has a farm there. They've had it for over 25 generations.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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ChefZadi, I am always impressed by your knowledge of korean food.

Nangmyun (mul version) I been told is definitely the quintessential N Korean food. One of my favorite dishes.

As for the drink, I don't know if I'd go with Soju or Makurlie (sp?).

Anyway, I never understood why korean food hasn't made it bigger than it has in the US but it may be that koreans that operate the resturants haven't really change it that much to fit the western palate. Instead they add janapease or chinese items to the menu that they think americans will like.

Tony doing a korean show would be great but not as great as me going on a curlinary tour of korea (one of my goals).

The only show I've seen do korea was the lonely planet. Ian Wright went around south korea. Pretty interesting.

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I wonder if he considered going to Pakistan I know he said India was on his list but the food and culture is different even though there are some similarities. There are some big differences too.

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I find that I keep coming back to this thread to look again and again at the fabulous meat-on-sticks picture.

I love No Reservations so, so much. My husband and I have watched each episode twice so far. Even the repeat is way better than anything else on tv. Bravo to all involved.


You say I am mysterious. Let me explain myself. In a land of oranges, I am faithful to apples. ~ Elsa Gidlow

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The website lists these as the next three:

October 10th 7:00PM/10:00PM (WST)

Sicily

In Sicily, Tony also eats some tripes at a local frittola stand in II Capo Market, a spleen sandwich with Sicily's President, and salt salt encrusted fish. Later, Tony also debates where you can get the best cannoli.

October 17th 7:00PM/10:00PM (WST)

Las Vegas

On assignment and with deadline looming for a major food magazine, Tony's got four days to cover the "very best" of the new chef-centric Las Vegas. He visits The Double Down, Bouchon, El Sombrero, Beauty Bar, Freemont Street and much more.

October 24th 7:00PM/10:00PM (WST)

Uzbekistan

Tony is in for a wild trip as he journeys through Uzbekistan's 2000-year-old capital, Tashkent, dines at Jumanji, goes to a bellydancing club, gets acquainted with the culture by visiting a local mosque, shops for a wedding present and much more.

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I have heard rumor that Bourdain does Vegas with Michael Ruhlman flavored with an essance of Thompson's "Leaving Las Vegas." Is this true? Weeeha, that would be fun to watch. :laugh:

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I watched Tony's Sicilian adventures and thoroughly enjoyed it. The food, of course, looked amazing as did the architecture. I especially liked Tony pointing out that the male statues were "hung like hamsters." World class chef, globetrotter, successful author and art critic, all wrapped up in one! How cool was it for the President (theirs, not ours) to hang out with him and dine with him. If that was prearranged then I'm awestruck by the connections the man has.

However, I'm torn as to what was most impressive: a) him climbing 100 feet up a cliff and maybe jumping to his possible grisly death? Or b) him shoving a palmful of assorted mystery meat from various animals into his mouth served by a man with his bare hands from a covered, steaming basket? Why was it covered exactly? Do we really want to know? The thought of him contemplating cracking his head open and being feasted on by those he has previously feasted on, fantastic. Tony Bourdain and the circle of life.

Next week: exotic Las Vegas. I can't wait.


Edited by divalasvegas (log)

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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I'm shocked that Tony didn't know cannolis are Sicilian.

But I was very impressed with the cliff-climbing. I recall some serious shortness of breath on a recent episode, when he was walking up to a temple. This looked way harder.

Also, nice example of a No Reservations Advance Medical Directive. Travellers, take note -- it's vacation footage! It's instructions to your loved ones in the event of a horrible accident! It's both!


My fantasy? Easy -- the Simpsons versus the Flanders on Hell's Kitchen.

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I have heard rumor that Bourdain does Vegas with Michael Ruhlman flavored with an essance of Thompson's "Leaving Las Vegas."  Is this true?  Weeeha, that would be fun to watch.   :laugh:

I have heard from people involved (very involved) that this is in fact true. It has been described to me as a "dark story". Can not wait to see this one.

Edit: It is Thompson's "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream" not "Leaving Las Vegas" which was a movie about an alcoholic going on a bender starring Elizebeth Shue and Nick Cage based on the book by John O'Brien.


Edited by M.X.Hassett (log)

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I enjoyed the Sicily one very much as well. It has so far been the best, don't know maybe because I have a soft spot for Italian stuff in general. My favorite part was the part with the caper pickers (caperers? caperinos? :wacko: ) and the meal he shared with them. those fish looked awsome, even if they forgot the salad.

I really thought he will chicken out from the cliff jump! I would' ve. Since he did however, maybe if he ever makes it to Beirut, Lebanon he might try jumping of off This rock, the famous Rouche Rock, located right off the beach of western Beirut. No kidding some people do, I have seen a few men jump off and not get injured. On the other hand it is quiet the popular suicide location :unsure: .

Elie


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Anyone care to provide highlights until I can find, ahem, other sources?

I've probably missed a few things, but:

  • Tony loses his luggage but not his composure at the airport
  • "Commoner's" lunch with the President of the Sicily Region
  • Salt harvesting (at Infersa?), in which Tony demonstrates he's no Mark Kurlansky. Salt-encrusted fish and old owner guy talking up salt for lunch.
  • Manual caper harvest including a large feast the guys have daily. Tony finds out lunch isn't free.
  • Overcome by TV star ennui, Tony decides to play hooky and tourist simultaneously
  • Hangs out with scantily clad ladies on a boat, jumps about 75 feet off cliff into the sea
  • Tony plays bocce with random old men, apparently mugs them for their money
  • Lunch on Mt. Etna. Mmmm, sulphur.
  • Visit to a film festival and a Sicilian friend who attended NYU
  • NYU guy snarks on "No Reservations" during end credits


Mike Harney

"If you're afraid of your food, you're probably not digesting it right because your stomach is all crunched up in fear. So you'll end up not being well."

- Julia Child

"There's no reason to say I'm narrow-minded. Just do it my way and you will have no problem at all."

- KSC Pad Leader Guenter Wendt

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I think the Sicily episode was the best yet. And I especially liked the exponentially increased swearing throughout the episode. Nice touch.

Looks like things are shaping up. The Vegas preview looks great too. Maybe they're figuring out what works.

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MHarney - thanks for the recap. Accurate and funny is always a winning combo.

Now that I've seen the show, I have to agree that the crew has finally found the sweet spot. This was well-paced, damn funny, and a good mix of food, culture, and abuse of the host. I loved the zen vibe of the Malaysia ep, but they knocked this one out of the park.

The Vegas previews? Toss Tony out of a plane? Pass the popcorn - I'm so there.


Edited by inny (log)

Anna

------

"I brought you a tuna sandwich. They say it's brain food. I guess because there's so much dolphin in it, and you know how smart they are." -- Marge Simpson

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Ok, this one was gold, enough Tony'isms to fill a book. I must though add M.R. please take of the shades when in a non-sun drenched resto. :shock::raz::wink:

Edit: Anyone notice the first shot of AB on the computer. Looked like his key strokes were e-g-u-l.

Edit2: Oh my.............. Tony midgets and a good looking woman.


Edited by M.X.Hassett (log)

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My youngest boy phoned right at the beginning of the show, and when I told him Bourdain and Ruhlman were doing the opening of Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, he was very impressed. Too bad he didn't have the Travel Channel in order to see the size of that Cadillac. My oldest boy, who I phoned to tell him to turn the show on to see the wonder of it all, also didn't have Travel Channel, but was equally impressed. Good job, guys.

Now. What's this? I saw Ruhlman SMOKING A CIGARETTE! Sheesh. IS there no level of debauchery you two will sink to for a gag? Guess not.

A


"I'm not looking at the panties, I'm looking at the vegetables!" --RJZ

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