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Celeriac


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aside from celeriac remoulade -- my childhood nemesis, now a rediscovered fave -- and mashed potatoes, thoughts on how else to use?

we picked some beautiful specimens up yesterday at the local farmers' market and i'm inclined to experiment.

(p.s. extra points for hot-weather dishes.)

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I have found that celeriac is excellent when roasted in the oven and also used raw in a salad, cut into tiny julienne matchstick strips, served with a creamy dressing. :biggrin: Yummy and healthy as well!

more ideas from Cordon Vert Cooking School

Edited by Gifted Gourmet (log)

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I have found that celeriac is excellent when roasted in the oven and also used raw in a salad, cut into tiny julienne matchstick strips, served with a creamy dressing.

i love the soups! and will have to try it in the salad as well. reminds me of putting raw jicama in ...

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I do the scalloped thing, using celeriac instead of potatoes, sometimes adding cheese, but usually just plain.

Occasionally layering it with medallions of pork tenderloin, searing the pork on each side briefly just before layering it in the casserole. Very tasty.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Look here for Bleu d'Auvergne's fish soup. It calls for celeriac and is delicious.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I have found that celeriac is excellent when roasted in the oven and also used raw in a salad, cut into tiny julienne matchstick strips, served with a creamy dressing. :biggrin: Yummy and healthy as well!

You took the words right out of my mouth.

Here's a recipe for a Celeriac salad or slaw (adapted from the Farmers' Market Cookbook)

1 lb celeriac

1 1/2 T white wine vinegar (or Champagne)

2 1/2 T mayo

2 t Dijon

1 T heavy cream (milk is ok but add a bit more mayo)

1 1/2 t fresh tarragon

salt and pepper

Peel celeriac and cut into matchsticks (put matchsticks into cold water as you go). Drain well and toss with vinegar. Make dressing with mayo, mustard, cream, tarragon, salt and pepper. Toss dressing with vinigar-ed (?) celeriac and chill at least one hour.

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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Here's a more substantial salad with celery root, ham and Gruyere cheese:

click here

And somewhere, I remember seeing a recipe for "Three Celery Soup" -- a creamy soup made with celery and celery root, garnished with chopped celery leaves. I never did make it, but it sounded good. I'll have to see if I can find it.

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And somewhere, I remember seeing a recipe for "Three Celery Soup" -- a creamy soup made with celery and celery root, garnished with chopped celery leaves. I never did make it, but it sounded good. I'll have to see if I can find it.

I do something similar but with Lovage instead of the celery leaves.

I haven't been able to grow celery here with much success but lovage grows like a weed and I am constantly chopping off the tops to keep it from self-seeding all over the garden.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Here's a recipe for a Celeriac salad or slaw (adapted from the Farmers' Market Cookbook)

i really like the addition of the tarragon here. imagine it would nicely balance the mustard flavor in the remoulade ...

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Shaved celery root strips done on the mandoline, clumped with some shaved onion, dipped in cold tempura batter, fried in small batches. Great with grilled blue fish with a shoyu, lime, and chile sauce.

Also makes great frites.

Just lovely as a puree with daube or beef or lamb shanks.

I also like to make a slaw with oion, celery hearts and leaves, with a vinaigrette with toasted celery seeds and black mustard seeds.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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A Marcella Hazan idea: peel and quarter the bulb; boil in salted water until tender; purée in a food processor with a tablespoon or so of black olive paste and a few tablespoons of olive oil. It's a great side for fish.

eGulleter identifiler suggests flavouring the purée with a bit of walnut oil. I can see how that'd work.

Am surprised that no one's mentioned celeriac mashed potatoes: cook your spuds and celery root together and mash as per usual. If you feel like it, try using some of the cooking liquid and olive oil to thin the purée.

Pat Wells' new cookbook (The Provence Cookbook) has an intriguing recipe for white beans cooked with lemon grass and seasoned before serving with a small amount of celeriac purée. PM me if you'd like the details.

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I use celeriac as one of the vegetables in my slow-roasted vegetable medley which I always prepare when I do a large pork roast for parties.

The vegetables can be roasted ahead of time and actually taste better the next day. It consists of potatoes, carrots, parsnips, celeriac, onions, celery, kohlrabi, poblano or other mild chile and garlic. Drizzled and tossed with enough olive oil to coat, sprinkled with kosher salt and coarsely ground pepper and a little chopped rosemary, then roasted for about 2 to 2 1/2 hours at 275 degrees, stirring occasionally.

I seldom have any leftovers. Too bad, because this is great heated in a skillet in which bacon or sausage has been cooked, to accompany a nice breakfast of eggs and etc.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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after all the amazing suggestions, we ended up julienning it and making the traditional remoulade -- but between the soups and the Hazan puree and some of the other ideas, we decided we'd load up on celeriac this weekend at the farmers market and have a celeriac-ful week.

i especially like the roasting idea. have made something similar, with olive oil and rosemary, for Thanksgiving for years now. would love to add celeriac to the roasting pan too ...

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we don't see it the markets here till october or so, I like to make a potato salad with equal amounts of potato and celeriac. In a soup I like to get some hazelnut in somehow as I really like the two flavours together.

"There never was an apple, according to Adam, that wasn't worth the trouble you got into for eating it"

-Neil Gaiman

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  • 2 weeks later...

fwiw, i made the celeriac-pear soup last night from Cordon Vert. i'm not on balance a fan of meat-eschewing recipes for something like this -- even debated whether to sub in chicken broth -- but all i can say is ... wow.

one of the best soups i've ever made. the subtle earthiness and the very slight sweetness of the pear meld together into this wonderful creation. it's great hot, it's great cold. it's just plain terrific. and not a bit of cream in it.

the only drawback is the recipe, which is notably short on detail. (simmer? OK. covered or uncovered? chopped? OK, how small?) also, it results in a soup so thick it can almost be sculpted. a healthy dose of vegetable broth added during the final stir brings it to the right consistency.

thanks again for the wonderful suggestions ...

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