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Tripe: Preparing, Cooking


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Well done to all that eat tripe !

Having fed my dogs and ferrets on Green(raw)tripes I doubt if I could eat it, even though some of the food I have is alien to others ie. traditional roast woodcock.

Again well done one and all :smile:

"It's true I crept the boards in my youth, but I never had it in my blood, and that's what so essential isn't it? The theatrical zeal in the veins. Alas, I have little more than vintage wine and memories." - Montague Withnail.

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  • 6 months later...

Tripe is one of my favorite dishes. Its rare to find it cooked to perfection because I feel the first step which is the most difficult is cleaning it properly. If not cleaned properly it will never taste right. While having dinner with friends at A Voce in NYC (UNREAL PLACE) a couple of months ago I saw and jumped at the tripe on the menu. It was the best I have ever had (homemade and commercial). I asked how it was cleaned and the waiter promptly answered its bleached three times before cooking. Does anyone know what this technique of bleaching is? I am sure its no clorox bath. I really appreciate the responses!!! :biggrin:

"I bid you peace, until we meet again"

~Frugal Gourmet Jeff Smith

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I wonder if he meant Blanched...

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

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As far as I know, bleached tripe actually IS soaked in a solution that makes it whiter and more visually appealing. However, I think it is a hydrogen peroxide solution, not sodium hypochlorite (aka chlorine bleach).

Interesting that it's done 3 times.....maybe someone else can weigh in on this bleaching process and how it really goes down.

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As far as I know, bleached tripe actually IS soaked in a solution that makes it whiter and more visually appealing. However, I think it is a hydrogen peroxide solution, not sodium hypochlorite (aka chlorine bleach).

Interesting that it's done 3 times.....maybe someone else can weigh in on this bleaching process and how it really goes down.

I've always just bought the stuff in butcher shops, where it already seemed absolutely white. I'm not sure if it's possible to buy it fresh out of the steere, so to speak--doesn't seem quite hygenic. Unless, of course, you live on a farm.

The first time I made tripe the smell and the taste were overwhelming, and not at all in a pleasant way. My grandmother taught me that adding some torn celery and spoonful of vinegar to the boiling liquid eliminates the problem. I'm not sure why it works, but it does.

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Mario Batali said, on a radio segment I heard not long ago, that they bleached the tripe at his restaurant. If he said what the solution was or how long the treatment lasted, I've forgotten that part. But he was very specific that it was bleached - just enough to lose most, but not quite all, of the funky urea taste. If I can find a link to that show, I'll come back here and post it.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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A thorough, if technical, explanation.

Blends of these peracid precursors, i.e., tartaric, malic, maleic and acetic acids, may also be used. A preferred blend comprises tartaric and malic acid precursors.

Preferably, the hydrogen peroxide and peracid precursor are present in a mole ratio of about 0.5-20. This ratio ensures the optimum balance of bleaching performance and economics, utilizing the current cost of raw materials. This optimum is also defined by current permissible shipping limits in the United States. The preferred mole ratio is in the portion of this range above 1% and even more preferably in the portion of the range of 15% or more.

Peroxide is employed in 50% H2 O2 aqueous solution, i.e., the maximum concentration of food grade hydrogen peroxide currently available commercially.

The tripe bleaching compositions of the present invention can be used at various stages in the processing of tripe into a saleable product. Preferably, they are added after the tripe has been washed, which improves the contacting of the bleach with the tripe. Washing can be accomplished with water typically at approximately 140° F. for about 4 to 6 minutes. Even more preferably, the bleaching agents of the present invention are added after the washed tripe is cleaned. Typical cleaners include Tripe Wash HV™, Brillo™ and Bruto™ available from Bruto™available from Birko Corporation in Henderson, Col.

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  • 5 months later...
Tripe lovers who are short on time might do well to look for canned tripe.  The stuff I had today was shockingly ok.

NO WAY really????

well I am a tripe lover and can imagine it was ok because cooking the snot out of it is what it is all about..

I have never seen tripe in a can before ..but will look and give it a try based on your note so thank you! it would be nice to be able to just add it to some menudo or make a quick something something ...

I am on the hunt for canned tripe now just to see!

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Hummingbirdkiss,

Goya makes canned tripe. It's called "mondongo". I've tasted it and much prefer the homemade.

In Puerto Rico, it's usually made on weekends but especially for Sunday and Monday mornings for hangovers. It's calle "revive muertos" because it's so sumptuous it could revive the dead. It's served in a bowl with a side of white rice and a bottle of "pique" (homemade hot sauce).

After you wash it thoroughly with some naranja agria (sour orange) in the water, you boil the tripe cut into squares or strips, with split cow's feet, with chunks of cubanelle pepper and onion. When it's almost done, you add the yautia (white taro root), potatoes, and calabaza (squash) cut into medium sized pieces. That is the basic recipe and according to personal taste, you could also add sliced green bananas and garbanzo beans (canned or previously cooked in just water). While that's all cooking you heat up some sofrito - onions, peppers, garlic, aji dulce (sweet chili pepper) recao (Puerto Rican coriander or culantro), cilantrillo (which is what cilantro is called in PR), oregano and/or oregano brujo (wild or Cuban oregano), in some olive oil and then add tomato sauce. You cook this until the olive oil comes back up to the surface in little drops. At his point, you can dip a piece of pan de agua (like a baguette) in it because it's really delicious. When the yautia is almost done, you add the sofrito mix, season with S&P, and let cook for a few minutes more. Make sure you clean out your sofrito pan with some of the broth to get all the goodies stuck to it into the pot. To thicken, mash a piece of calabaza, yautia, and potato. At this point, when you're about to turn it off, you add another sprig of cilantro, and a couple of leaves of recao, stir, cover for a few minutes, and voila!!! You're set for a wonderful meal.

I think I'll make some this weekend! I may have to travel all over York, PA to get the ingredients, but it's well worth it.

Sandra >> who just needs a glass of water because writing it down was a meal in itself!

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I have never seen canned tripe. Has anyone tried cooking it in a pressure cooker? Seems like a reasonable way to cut cooking time.

My pressure cooker book calls for cooking for 15 minutes under full pressure. I've never done it but it should work.

Mmmm! Menudo!

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Does anyone know why the tripe I see in the local street market black? I have never seen white honeycomb tripe here. Even the ones that look like a fuzzy towel. It seems to me almost all tripe here are black. Why is it so?

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

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Does anyone know why the tripe I see in the local street market black? I have never seen white honeycomb tripe here. Even the ones that look like a fuzzy towel. It seems to me almost all tripe here are black. Why is it so?

That's one of the back stomachs I think. Sounds like the stuff Bourdain was eating in Beijing. Not sure how you make that stuff. Looked good when he was eating it though. God I need tripe. It's been way too long!

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Does anyone know why the tripe I see in the local street market black? I have never seen white honeycomb tripe here. Even the ones that look like a fuzzy towel. It seems to me almost all tripe here are black. Why is it so?

I think they are black because they haven't been cleaned and bleached. I remember my grandmother buying some when I was a kid, and it seemed a lot of work to get it edible, and white. Once she found cleaned and bleached tripe she never went back.

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Hummingbirdkiss,

Goya makes canned tripe. It's called "mondongo". I've tasted it and much prefer the homemade.

In Puerto Rico, it's usually made on weekends but especially for Sunday and Monday mornings for hangovers. It's calle "revive muertos" because it's so sumptuous it could revive the dead. It's served in a bowl with a side of white rice and a bottle of "pique" (homemade hot sauce).

After you wash it thoroughly with some naranja agria (sour orange) in the water, you boil the tripe cut into squares or strips, with split cow's feet, with chunks of cubanelle pepper and onion. When it's almost done, you add the yautia (white taro root), potatoes, and calabaza (squash) cut into medium sized pieces. That is the basic recipe and according to personal taste, you could also add sliced green bananas and garbanzo beans (canned or previously cooked in just water). While that's all cooking you heat up some sofrito - onions, peppers, garlic, aji dulce (sweet chili pepper) recao (Puerto Rican coriander or culantro), cilantrillo (which is what cilantro is called in PR), oregano and/or oregano brujo (wild or Cuban oregano), in some olive oil and then add tomato sauce. You cook this until the olive oil comes back up to the surface in little drops. At his point, you can dip a piece of pan de agua (like a baguette) in it because it's really delicious. When the yautia is almost done, you add the sofrito mix, season with S&P, and let cook for a few minutes more. Make sure you clean out your sofrito pan with some of the broth to get all the goodies stuck to it into the pot. To thicken, mash a piece of calabaza, yautia, and potato. At this point, when you're about to turn it off, you add another sprig of cilantro, and a couple of leaves of recao, stir, cover for a few minutes, and voila!!! You're set for a wonderful meal.

I think I'll make some this weekend! I may have to travel all over York, PA to get the ingredients, but it's well worth it.

Sandra >> who just needs a glass of water because writing it down was a meal in itself!

Thank you so much for telling how to make this dish! and then maybe no on the canned tripe then ...fresh is so easy to find very inexpensive and while it takes a while to cook ...I have a "while"..so why not... I have had this dish and loved it ...my friend made it for us during flu season last hear when we all had to work a Saturday clinic ..it was the best breakfast ever!!!

I am going to gather everything and make it this weekend for sure..guess I should get drunk on Friday to make a scientific test of its healing powers huh? :shock:

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Girlfriend!!!! many thank you's!!!! I made this mondongo!!! and let me tell you ..the way my man's heart is through a cows stomach :wub: ...via this most awesome dish

..if you like tripe and do not try this ..you are soo missing out

I scored on the cow foot the Korean butcher sliced it for me in perfect pieces ..the tripe was just perfect ...local grower ..cheap!!! and perfectly trimmed ...

everything came together and that was awesome to find all the ingredients in just two stores!

thanks so much

Hummingbirdkiss,

Goya makes canned tripe. It's called "mondongo". I've tasted it and much prefer the homemade.

In Puerto Rico, it's usually made on weekends but especially for Sunday and Monday mornings for hangovers. It's calle "revive muertos" because it's so sumptuous it could revive the dead. It's served in a bowl with a side of white rice and a bottle of "pique" (homemade hot sauce).

After you wash it thoroughly with some naranja agria (sour orange) in the water, you boil the tripe cut into squares or strips, with split cow's feet, with chunks of cubanelle pepper and onion. When it's almost done, you add the yautia (white taro root), potatoes, and calabaza (squash) cut into medium sized pieces. That is the basic recipe and according to personal taste, you could also add sliced green bananas and garbanzo beans (canned or previously cooked in just water). While that's all cooking you heat up some sofrito - onions, peppers, garlic, aji dulce (sweet chili pepper) recao (Puerto Rican coriander or culantro), cilantrillo (which is what cilantro is called in PR), oregano and/or oregano brujo (wild or Cuban oregano), in some olive oil and then add tomato sauce. You cook this until the olive oil comes back up to the surface in little drops. At his point, you can dip a piece of pan de agua (like a baguette) in it because it's really delicious. When the yautia is almost done, you add the sofrito mix, season with S&P, and let cook for a few minutes more. Make sure you clean out your sofrito pan with some of the broth to get all the goodies stuck to it into the pot. To thicken, mash a piece of calabaza, yautia, and potato. At this point, when you're about to turn it off, you add another sprig of cilantro, and a couple of leaves of recao, stir, cover for a few minutes, and voila!!! You're set for a wonderful meal.

I think I'll make some this weekend! I may have to travel all over York, PA to get the ingredients, but it's well worth it.

Sandra >> who just needs a glass of water because writing it down was a meal in itself!

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Has anyone ever marinated it overnight with herbs, spices and wine, sliced it up, confited it in pork fat overnight at a low temp (180 F), and then deep fried it to crisp it. I haven't ever had tripe, but assuming that it is filled with collagen this might really tenderize it and then give it a nice textural contrast. This is how I recently saw pig ears prepared in another eGullet thread (there's a video), and it just made perfect sense to me.

If slow and low is the way to go, then I imagine that this method would work perfectly. Also, the marination and the high temperature during the deep-fry crisping might help to remove some of the stronger flavors that some might find unappealing...maybe.

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Girlfriend!!!! many thank you's!!!! I made this mondongo!!! and let me tell you  ..the way my man's heart is through a cows stomach  :wub: ...via this most awesome dish

..if you like tripe and do not try this ..you are soo missing out 

I scored on the cow foot the Korean butcher sliced it for me in perfect pieces ..the tripe was just perfect ...local grower ..cheap!!! and perfectly trimmed ...

everything came together and that was awesome to find all the ingredients in just two stores!

thanks so much

You're welcome!!!

I'm so glad you enjoyed it. My daughter is always asking for a big pot of it so I usually make it for a Sunday dinner and have everyone over. She's very figure concious but eats 3 bowls of it, covered with scoops of white rice, with no qualms.

I guess you'll be making it again!

Sandra

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Hummingbirdkiss,

Goya makes canned tripe. It's called "mondongo". I've tasted it and much prefer the homemade.

In Puerto Rico, it's usually made on weekends but especially for Sunday and Monday mornings for hangovers. It's calle "revive muertos" because it's so sumptuous it could revive the dead. It's served in a bowl with a side of white rice and a bottle of "pique" (homemade hot sauce).

After you wash it thoroughly with some naranja agria (sour orange) in the water, you boil the tripe cut into squares or strips, with split cow's feet, with chunks of cubanelle pepper and onion. When it's almost done, you add the yautia (white taro root), potatoes, and calabaza (squash) cut into medium sized pieces. That is the basic recipe and according to personal taste, you could also add sliced green bananas and garbanzo beans (canned or previously cooked in just water). While that's all cooking you heat up some sofrito - onions, peppers, garlic, aji dulce (sweet chili pepper) recao (Puerto Rican coriander or culantro), cilantrillo (which is what cilantro is called in PR), oregano and/or oregano brujo (wild or Cuban oregano), in some olive oil and then add tomato sauce. You cook this until the olive oil comes back up to the surface in little drops. At his point, you can dip a piece of pan de agua (like a baguette) in it because it's really delicious. When the yautia is almost done, you add the sofrito mix, season with S&P, and let cook for a few minutes more. Make sure you clean out your sofrito pan with some of the broth to get all the goodies stuck to it into the pot. To thicken, mash a piece of calabaza, yautia, and potato. At this point, when you're about to turn it off, you add another sprig of cilantro, and a couple of leaves of recao, stir, cover for a few minutes, and voila!!! You're set for a wonderful meal.

I think I'll make some this weekend! I may have to travel all over York, PA to get the ingredients, but it's well worth it.

Sandra >> who just needs a glass of water because writing it down was a meal in itself!

Must have this now!

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Has anyone ever marinated it overnight with herbs, spices and wine, sliced it up, confited it in pork fat overnight at a low temp (180 F), and then deep fried it to crisp it.  I haven't ever had tripe, but assuming that it is filled with collagen this might really tenderize it and then give it a nice textural contrast.  This is how I recently saw pig ears prepared in another eGullet thread (there's a video), and it just made perfect sense to me.

If slow and low is the way to go, then I imagine that this method would work perfectly.  Also, the marination and the high temperature during the deep-fry crisping might help to remove some of the stronger flavors that some might find unappealing...maybe.

So, since no one had any thoughts on a confited tripe that is then deep fried, I decided to do it myself. I found some recipes for deep fried tripe that first included boiling it for about 4 hours, so I figured that my method was sound enough since, just like boiling, it is intended to break down a lot of that collagen. I am using honeycomb tripe, and simply the recipe for Jim Drohman's Pork Belly Confit from Michael Ruhlman's Charcuterie book. It has cinnamon, black pepper, cloves, all spice, fresh thyme, salt, pink salt, and white wine to cover. It is currently curing for about 24 hours, and then after rinsing and drying, I'm going to confit it in home-rendered pork fat at about 180 F overnight. Then I'll drain it, deep fry the pieces--they are about 2" x 2"--over high heat until the outside is crisp and golden-brown, and serve with some French mustard, pickled onions, and baguette. I'll let you all know how it turns out. Next on the list is a menudo recipe from Rick Bayless.

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What is a chocolatier doing with tripe!?! I had a few thoughts about the technique you mention for pig ears.

It sounds like you're talking about the Ste. Menehould method for pig ears and other really tasting parts that have a lot of collagen and/or fat. In the River Cottage Meat Cookbook, there's a great description of how to accomplish this technique. I think there is also reference to it in Jane Grigson's Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery book and maybe a recipe in the Culinaria France book. All are great and revolve around the slow braise/steaming of the cut.

While tripe may be a good for this method, I don't think the method depends on collagen richness. Mainly, the long slow cooking is used to soften the meat or cartilage in the ear, which is why the collagen lacking tripe would still be ok to use for Ste. Menehould.

When I've fried tripe before, I've braised it as normal (maybe with less aromats and less sticky stock like chicken as opposed to veal). Cooled it and dried it well. The drying part is actually the trickiest part. You can fry the tripe as is; dredge it with wondra flour, or tri-coat bread it and then deep fry it.

You might know about the website www.stlbites.com since you're in Columbia. Check out this link which has a description about cooking tripe:

http://forum.stlbites.com/viewtopic.php?t=45

Has anyone ever marinated it overnight with herbs, spices and wine, sliced it up, confited it in pork fat overnight at a low temp (180 F), and then deep fried it to crisp it. I haven't ever had tripe, but assuming that it is filled with collagen this might really tenderize it and then give it a nice textural contrast. This is how I recently saw pig ears prepared in another eGullet thread (there's a video), and it just made perfect sense to me.

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