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Yeast: Types, Use, Storage, Conversions (instant<>active, US<>UK, etc.)


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does it keep BETTER in the freezer than in the refrigerator?

I keep my SAS instant yeast in the freezer, I buy in bulk and its still active after two years. :wink:

Just a simple southern lady lost out west...

"Leave Mother in the fridge in a covered jar between bakes. No need to feed her." Jackal10

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We had a bakery close several years ago. We bought three large packages of yeast and froze them. We thawed one at the time and kept in the fridge. Each one lasted a year or more. Love that yeast. We buy at Sams now and do the same.

Cooking is chemistry, baking is alchemy.

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I once got a free bag of SAF instant yeast at a bakery show, used about a teaspoon to bake some bread, and placed the bag in the back of the refrigerator in a plastic container. About five years later I decided to bake bread again. The yeast was fine... perhaps not as active as fresher yeast would have been, but I didn't do a comparison test. I've baked many loaves of bread with that yeast with no problem.

Ilene

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  • 11 months later...

I bought a bread machine last week and so far it's been a bit hit and miss. It's the yeast that's confusing me. I bought two types, quick action yeast which is in 7g sachets and active dried yeast which is in a big tub. The problem is: the recipes that came with the breadmaker require 1 'sachet' but there's no mention of how much yeast should be in 1 sachet. On the back of the quick action yeast is a recipe for bread, but that gives yeast measurements in teaspoons. It seems a bit silly to open a sachet and start measuring. Is there a general rule with yeast - maybe so much quick action yeast is the same as so much active dried yeast?

I'd appreciate any input :D

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I assume your "quick action" yeast is probably the same as our "rapid rise" yeast. If so, this might help:

http://www.breadworld.com/tipsterms/faq.asp

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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Is there a general rule with yeast - maybe so much quick action yeast is the same as so much active dried yeast?

I'd appreciate any input :D

A basic rule of thumb is that if fresh (cake) yeast = 100%, then active dry yeast = 50% and quick-rise yeast = 33%. By that reckoning, 7g of the quick-rise would correspond to 10g of the dry. Most recipes, in my opinion, call for too much yeast anyway...but that's just a personal preference thing. I'll generally halve the yeast and double the rising time, because it makes for better tasting bread.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 2 months later...

I made this honey whole wheat, with (I don't have the recipe in front of me, I am sad to say) milk, honey, butter, a combo of bread flour and whole wheat. I used rapid rise yeast instead of compressed yeast. I could not find compressed yeast ANYWHERE I looked so I went with the rapid rise. it came out really dense and then I realized anytime I try to make bread with the rapid rise it does not rise as much and the bread comes out real dense and heavy. It does not have the light "airy" texture. It almost has a cake like texture.

I realize with out a recipe this may be hard to analyize, but could it be the yeast? Since I cannot find compressed like the recipe calls for, can I use plain, non rapid rise yeast? Does anyone know of good yeast?

thanks!

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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How much Rapid Rise did you use? Is this from a jar or a packet? I have made this substitution in highly-flavored breads like this in the past without much trouble, as long as the yeast is alive, but that's always the trick, esp. with rapid rise where you don't typically "bloom" it first.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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From everything I've read, rapid rise yeast should give you as good a rise, if not better than, regular active dry yeast. And it's easier to handle, as it doesn't require proofing and can be mixed directly into the dry ingredients.

Have you ever made this recipe with compressed yeast, and did it come out great?

Are you using proper substitution quantities? According to Peter Reinhart, 1 T of compressed fresh yeast = 1 tsp. of instant yeast.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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CKatCook, assuming that the recipe(s) is/are correct, I would guess (1) your instant yeast is old, or (2) that the yeast needs a little hydration before incorporation in the dough (unlikely for rapid rise), or (3) you are activating/hydrating the yeast before incorporating it and it is dying/losing power because of this (temp?/age?). Under most circumstances, there should not be such marked differences between recipes made with compressed yeast and the same recipes made with the correct equivalent amount of a dry yeast (and there's some latitude there).

-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine

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The manufacturers usually recommend ridiculous amounts-try just a teaspoonful.

my understanding is that the only thing "rapid" about rapid rise yeast is that it contains a higher percentage of living organisms than regular dry yeast. so for equal measures, you're actually putting more yeast into the dough. if you cut back the quantity by the right amount, the results should be virtually identical.

my suspicion is that fresh yeast is popular because the low percentage of live organisms forces you to use a lot of it, which can contribute more yeasty flavors. some people like that effect.

Notes from the underbelly

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my understanding is that the only thing "rapid" about rapid rise yeast is that it contains a higher percentage of living organisms than regular dry yeast.

I think this is basically right, though the particle size is also smaller, and I believe a different yeast strain in used (these two facts help to explain why you don't proof instant yeast - it grows too quickly and is wasted before it gets into the dough).

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I think the proofing may be the issue. I placed the yeast in 110 (I measured) water and let it set until there was a "head" on it like beer. Then added in the milk, honey, butter all heated to 110 degrees. Then added to the dry ingridents. And it would not rise for nothing. The recipe called for it to be punched down and risen, about 2 more times, but I could barely get it to rise once. I even turned on my oven and placed it on top the oven to see if that would help.

I used the dry packet, the recipe called for 2 oz compressed, I used two packet "compartments". It comes in a packet that is sectioned off into three sections.

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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I think the proofing may be the issue. I placed the yeast in 110 (I measured) water and let it set until there was a "head" on it like beer. Then added in the milk, honey, butter all heated to 110 degrees. Then added to the dry ingridents. And it would not rise for nothing. The recipe called for it to be punched down and risen, about 2 more times, but I could barely get it to rise once. I even turned on my oven and placed it on top the oven to see if that would help.

I used the dry packet, the recipe called for 2 oz compressed, I used two packet "compartments". It comes in a packet that is sectioned off into three sections.

My understanding is that instant( rapid-rise) yeast is specifically designed for single-rise breads, and should not be proofed, but rather mixed directly in with the dry ingredients. I use it for breads with a rise-punchdown-rise cycle, but I've never tried a second punchdown-rise with instant. Of course, anyone out there who knows better, please correct me!

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I used the dry packet, the recipe called for 2 oz compressed, I used two packet "compartments". It comes in a packet that is sectioned off into three sections.

I used Fleischman's Instant/Rapid yeast this weekend to make cinnamon buns. One packet (I think it has 7 or 9g in each of the 3 compartments) to approx. 4 cups of flour. I added the yeast to the dry ingredients, then mixed in the liquids. It more than doubled in 2 hours, punched down, filled, rolled, cut and doubled again in 45 minutes.

I think the suggestions of old yeast may be on to something. . . how long have you had it? Or, if you just bought it, does it have an expiry date on it? If it's good, it should give you a good rise.

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I think the proofing may be the issue. I placed the yeast in 110 (I measured) water and let it set until there was a "head" on it like beer. Then added in the milk, honey, butter all heated to 110 degrees. Then added to the dry ingridents. And it would not rise for nothing. The recipe called for it to be punched down and risen, about 2 more times, but I could barely get it to rise once. I even turned on my oven and placed it on top the oven to see if that would help.

I used the dry packet, the recipe called for 2 oz compressed, I used two packet "compartments". It comes in a packet that is sectioned off into three sections.

My understanding is that instant( rapid-rise) yeast is specifically designed for single-rise breads, and should not be proofed, but rather mixed directly in with the dry ingredients. I use it for breads with a rise-punchdown-rise cycle, but I've never tried a second punchdown-rise with instant. Of course, anyone out there who knows better, please correct me!

I love rapid rise or instant yeast and use it as my go to yeast. It is the same price at Active Dry yeast but you need to use 1/3 of the amount. Basically the above theory is what I believe happened. Do NOT mix the yeats with water and let it proof. stir it directly with the flour. I made this mistake once and sure enough, my bread was dense like yours.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I have another packet of the yeast, but I hesitate (sp?) to use it. The bread taste good....very good. But man, cake bread....LOL.

I think I will go get some regular yeast and see if that makes a difference. I am curious now about how it will work. The recipe really calls for it to be punched down and shaped 2 times before the final rise.

This may be a long night.....

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Yep - the proofing probably blew the rapid rise yeast's load.

And, as mentioned above, if your recipe calls for 2 oz. compressed yeast, you'll need to use approx. 2 tsps. of rapid rise yeast (per Peter Reinhart).

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Yep - the proofing probably blew the rapid rise yeast's load.

And, as mentioned above, if your recipe calls for 2 oz. compressed yeast, you'll need to use approx. 2 tsps. of rapid rise yeast (per Peter Reinhart).

about one half to one third of the fresh yeast by weight...so 1 oz of instant if the recipe calls for 2 oz of fresh.

and please don't proof in warm liquid. if you want to dissolve the yeast in liquid, you can do so, but cold or straight from the cold tap.

with any kind of yeast, be careful when you're putting it in contact with the full amount of sugar and liquid that the recipe calls for before adding it to the flour/dry items. this can give the yeast too much food to deal with and it can also cause it to either "blow its load" before mixing or it can sort of kill it off.

if you need to, stir the instant yeast in with the water and honey, but mix it right away with the dry ingredients.

i've never had any problems using instant and getting more than one fermentation from it.

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I am new into bread and would like to hear from experienced barker the prons

and cons of fresh yeast vs commercial yeast. I know fresh yeast is very tedious

and time consuming wheras commercial yeast is convenient.

Every eco-system has its own mircoorganism population and I always marvel and attracted by its distinct taste of european hard bread like somerset cider bread, rye, caraway & raisin bread, olive bread, walnut, pain de campagne and multiseed bread.

I would like to know how to make fresh yeast?

Thanks you

主泡一杯邀西方. 馥郁幽香而湧.三焦回转沁心房

"Inhale the aroma before tasting and drinking, savour the goodness from the heart "

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When I think of "fresh yeast", I think of cakes of compressed yeast that need refrigeration.

But, what I think you are referring to is a "maintained sourdough starter".

Perhaps you could clarify this for us.

I am new into bread and would like to hear from experienced barker the prons

and cons of fresh yeast vs commercial yeast.  I know fresh yeast is very tedious

and time consuming wheras commercial yeast is convenient.

Every eco-system has its own mircoorganism population and I always marvel and attracted by its distinct taste of european hard  bread like somerset cider bread, rye, caraway & raisin bread, olive bread, walnut, pain de campagne and multiseed bread.

I would like to know how to make fresh yeast?

Thanks you

Buen provecho, Panosmex
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