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Yeast: Types, Use, Storage, Conversions (instant<>active, US<>UK, etc.)


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16 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

The Red Star people have told me that if a recipe calls for sourdough starter, this yeast is not meant to replace that.  This product is to replace regular yeast with recipes requiring up to 4 cups of flour.  The whole packet is to be used.  They have a few recipes on their web site.  I just wrote to them to ask if there is a minimum amount if flour that needs to be used with this yeast.  I'll post their answer here when I get one, likely tomorrow.

 

I tried the Red Star sourdough stuff years ago.  Nothing bad but didn't do much for me.  Never felt the urge to buy more.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I tried the Red Star sourdough stuff years ago.  Nothing bad but didn't do much for me.  Never felt the urge to buy more.

 

 

I thought the sourdough instant yeast was a new product?

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10 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Don't know.  What I used was Red Star and it came from KAF in a little packet.

 

 

Maybe they re-formulated it.  I just checked the web site again and they list it as new.  I now have 40 packets of the stuff.  I ordered and received 20, and my sister on her way home, saw a HyVee in Iowa, stopped in and bought me 20 more.😲  

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Made some pancakes yesterday using the instant sourdough yeast.  The recipe said it needed to sit an hour before use and that is what I did.  The pancakes were all right, not great, but not bad.  I had a lot of batter left so I put it in the fridge.  Last night before bed I felt a hunger pang so I quickly cooked up some small ones.  My, how this batter had grown!  These little pancakes were much better that the ones we had for lunch.  Today we had pancakes again.   The batter had fully risen, the pancakes were nice and fluffy and they had that sourdough tang.  Not really strong, but it was noticeable.  Very good. 

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Here is a shot of a loaf of bread I made today using the instant sourdough yeast.  We used it for bacon and tomato sandwiches and could not detect any sourdough taste.  The next loaf I make will have a longer ferment - we'll see what the impact on taste the longer ferment has.  Bread is good, though.  (38 packets of yeast left.)

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  • 1 year later...

I am making olibollen for New Year's Eve, a Dutch tradition.  I am a bit flummoxed by a recipe I am using.  I never pre-proof instant yeast. However, the recipe I am using calls for the instant yeast to be pre-proofed.  I have no problem doing that, but what is the point?  After proofing the yeast, you continue mixing everything together, let the mixture sit until doubled then fry away.  Does anyone ever pre-proof instant yeast and if you do, can you please tell me why?

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I came up with the refrigerated cake yeast and then "active dry". I did the bit of sugar in warm water thing with the dry. I thought "proof" meant prove it will rise! Anyway I do not do it anymore with active dry or with instant  and have never had failure. My experience.

 

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3 hours ago, ElsieD said:

I am making olibollen for New Year's Eve, a Dutch tradition.  I am a bit flummoxed by a recipe I am using.  I never pre-proof instant yeast. However, the recipe I am using calls for the instant yeast to be pre-proofed.  I have no problem doing that, but what is the point?  After proofing the yeast, you continue mixing everything together, let the mixture sit until doubled then fry away.  Does anyone ever pre-proof instant yeast and if you do, can you please tell me why?

 

I am unfamiliar with olibollen but I have never found a need to pre-proof instant yeast for anything.  It is called instant for a reason.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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14 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I am unfamiliar with olibollen but I have never found a need to pre-proof instant yeast for anything.  It is called instant for a reason.

 

 

Olibollen are kind of like apple fritters.

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  • 1 year later...

What to do when you don't have the right type of yeast? Does having the right type of yeast matter in baking? Can you substitute a certain type for another type?

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The problem I have is that I'm currently overseas and the yeast here aren't classified like active, instant, rapid. I have no idea what yeast to get. So I read article on yeast on the website you posted. So my question is: if I don't know what yeast I'm using, I should just proof my yeast? Is that what I should do?

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8 hours ago, BooBear said:

What to do when you don't have the right type of yeast? Does having the right type of yeast matter in baking? Can you substitute a certain type for another type?

How about some specifics about what you have and what your recipe calls for?

I use fresh yeast for some recipes but it isn't critical.  I often substitute active dry yeast but I "bloom" it first in warm water or milk with a tiny bit of sugar.

I have instant yeast, I have rapid-rise yeast that is lightly different and I have special salt-rising yeast that requires several hours of prepping before adding to other ingredients. 

 

Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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On 3/18/2022 at 11:14 AM, BooBear said:

The problem I have is that I'm currently overseas and the yeast here aren't classified like active, instant, rapid. I have no idea what yeast to get. So I read article on yeast on the website you posted. So my question is: if I don't know what yeast I'm using, I should just proof my yeast? Is that what I should do?

 

Help us to help you.  Where in the world do you live?  Different counties traditionally use different yeasts.  Scandinavia, I've read, predominately uses readily available fresh yeast.  Whereas more civilized societies employ instant yeast.  Proofing fresh yeast is advisable.  Proofing instant yeast can be a good way to kill it.

 

Once you know what yeasts you have there are conversions from one yeast type to another.

 

If you don't know what yeast you're using you may as well try baking powder.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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