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evaporated milk


torakris
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For some reason when I was in the US last year I bought 8 cans of evaporated milk, I am not sure what I was planning to use them for but they have just been sitting there gathering dust.

What can you do with evaporated milk?

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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edited for stupidity

I think a lot of pumpkin pie recipes call for it.

Check out this web site: http://www.petevaporatedmilk.com/sides/Default.htm

I've never bought the stuff, but for some reason, used to have a pet recipe booklet. One of the kids used it to make a collage.

But, I do remember my grandmother that when my mother was born, she couldn't nurse, so the standard was to feed infants evaporated milk with a few drops of Karo syrup (latter to prevent constipation).

What possessed you to buy it?

Edited by snowangel (log)
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I don't use it much for cooking. It is a popular ingredient in Mexican cooking and is one of the components of Tres Leches cake.

I just use it in my coffee for the most part. I just happen to like the cooked milk flavor and it doesn't spoil nearly as fast as regular milk.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Butterscotch Sauce with pecans!

6T butter

3/4 cup brown sugar

3/4 cup evaporated milk

1/3 cup pecans

Melt butter and sugar in pan bring to boil and boil for 2 minutes. Cool for 5.

Heat evaporated milk then add to mixture. Stir and cook over low heat for two minutes.

Add toasted pecans and serve! (over vanilla ice cream is a good start)

mmmmmmmmmmm!

enjoy!

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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I use evaporated milk for a light no-bake cheesecake recipe I learnt from a friend years ago.

Prepare a biscuit base in an 8-inch dish - I just use crushed Marie / Digestive biscuits, a tablespoon of sugar and some melted butter. Mix crushed biscuits, sugar and melted butter together and press into dish. Set aside.

Beat a softened 250g (8oz) block of Philadelphia cream cheese till light and fluffy. Add a can of evaporated milk, half a teaspoon of finely grated lemon rind and a packet of lemon jelly crystals (I use Cottees since that's what my friend used) dissolved in half a cup of hot water (I sometimes add half a teaspoon of gelatine to the jelly crystals). Mix till smooth and pour cream cheese mixture on top of biscuit base. Place the dish in the fridge to set. Decorate cheesecake once set with slices of strawberries and kiwi fruit if desired.

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Shiewie -- any chance you can translate "a packet of lemon jelly crystals (I use Cottees since that's what my friend used)" into a product easily available in the U.S.? The recipe sounds good, but I don't know what that is. :sad:

I was going to say "mac & cheese" but hillvalley beat me to it. :smile:

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Mac and cheese! That is why I bought it!

I had made the recipe from the The Best Recipe just before I went on my trip, haven't made it since though............. :blink:

I am getting a lot of ideas though, keept them coming!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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As I said elsewhere on egullet, I always have a few cans of evaporated milk in the pantry.

You can use it for anything that calls for milk, when you want a little extra richness or body. Like using cream, but without the additional fat.

I always use it to finish scrambled eggs, and in omlets and French toast. Also in creamed soups, and creamed veggies and gravies.

The uses are simply endless -- far too many to list here. Just think of everything you prepare that calls for cream or milk.

The cans keep forever, and any recipe that calls for milk, you can dilute the canned milk 1 to 1 and use that.

But again, most of the time, rather than dilute it, I use it like cream. My mother used to whip it like cream, too, and add vanilla and sugar for a topping, although I've never tried that.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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You can use it for anything that calls for milk, when you want a little extra richness or body. Like using cream, but without the additional fat.

Right. I use evaporated skim milk as a substitute for cream in soups, custards, etc. It's low fat, but since a lot of the water has been removed, will do the job that whole milk or light cream would accomplish for those that aren't "calorically challenged" in the same way that I am.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Shiewie -- any chance you can translate "a packet of lemon jelly crystals (I use Cottees since that's what my friend used)" into a product easily available in the U.S.?  The recipe sounds good, but I don't know what that is.  :sad:

Yup, elyse is right. Cottee's lemon jelly is an Australian brand of lemon Jell-o. A packet of Cottee's lemon jelly comes in an 85g packet. Use a 3 oz. packet of lemon Jell-o instead.

I add additional gelatine as it's hot here in Malaysia and the cheesecake starts melting if it's left on the table for too long. You may not need to as it lots colder where you are.

It's a quick recipe that can be doubled easily for a crowd.... and it low"er" fat than the average cheesecake :biggrin: .

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dulce du leche

Banoffi pie

I like it instead of cream for fruit fools (gooseberry, Damson etc). Just mix it with the fruit puree

In some parts of the world, like India or Singapore it is essential for putting in the local version of tea or coffee. I guess as a colonial hold-iver

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I keep cans and cans around for the best macaroni and cheese ever, which is indeed the John Thorne/Cook's Illustrated version.

Evaporated milk I use also in pumpkin pie, sweet-potato pie, and the steamed brown-sugar cake that the Chinese call Malaysian Cake, ma la gau.

I have read that it can be chilled until very cold and whipped as a substitute for whipped cream, and I have been meaning to try this one fine day.

Cans of it are also good provision against power outages, sniper attacks, and terrorist attacks. (I live in the Washington, D.C. area., where the memory of all three is still fresh.)

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I have read that it can be chilled until very cold and whipped as a substitute for whipped cream, and I have been meaning to try this one fine day.

Yes, as I said above, my mother used to do this all the time. But I hesitated going into any great detail because I never actually tried it myself.

And I just want to elaborate upon what Snow said. Reading over this thread, there is clearly some confusion.

There is a huge difference between 'evaporated' milk, and 'sweetened condensed' milk.

'Evaporated' milk is just concentrated. Supposedly on a 1 to 1 basis; that is, to achieve regular whole milk, you mix 1 can of evap milk with 1 can of water. Evap milk is not sweet. It comes as evaporated regular whole milk (which is what several of us said we always keep in our pantries as a staple), and as evaporated skimmed milk, which is an excellent product for diets. Evaporated milk is perfect for scrambling eggs, or putting into recipes, any recipe that calls for milk or cream.

"Condensed" milk is also sold in the same small cans, but is usually sold "sweetened." The most popular is "Eagle" brand. It is a heavy, thick, extremely sweet product which people use as a base for many desserts, such as flan, lime and lemon pies, etc. Lots of folk just add a spoon or two to berries, fruit, etc., to make a quick dessert, like "pineapple fool." It is also the one that people boil in water to make a caramel similar to cajeta or dulce de leche.

These two products cannot be easily substituted for one another, and they are totally different things.

Evaporated milk is one of the most versatile products available today and its uses are limitless. It would be impossible to create even a marginally definitive list. It's difficult to imagine having "too much" evaporated milk.

Sweetened condensed milk has, in my own opinion, considerably fewer uses.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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My mom's Christmas fudge recipe calls for a can of evaporated milk.

Mmmm...fudge. :wub:

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Use it to poach fish , Alton Brown has a recipe that is pretty good on FTV website. I believe it is called "Catfish au Lait"

U can substitute it for milk in almost any recipe in order to get a different cooked milk flavor.

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Have only used it in the most amazing mac and cheese recipe ever.  I keep it on hand in case I have a craving for the m&C!

http://www.outlawcook.com/Page0210.html

okay, I will be restless and discomfited until you tell me the truth--whazzat the RealDeal Pearl Bailey, voice of the South?

The webpage presents John Thorne's (and his mother's) take on a macaroni and cheese recipe from an old wood-stove manual. At the end of the recipe John Thorne quotes the one and only Pearl Bailey, from her cookbook Pearl's Kitchen: An Extraordinary Cookbook (published 1974). Pearl Bailey's recipe for mac and cheese makes the Southern custardy variety, with eggs, milk, cheese, and macaroni baked in the oven. Her cookbook is an entertaining read, full of stories from her life and good recipes for Southern standards.

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One warning about the recipe....make sure the cheese you get will melt smoothly. (I hvae no idea how you would know this ahead of time.) Made this a few days ago with a Cabot cheddar and the cheese was almost grainy. A real disappointment considering how good it looked.

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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You can also do an ingredient search on Allrecipes.com. Click on "search by ingredient" and then type in "evaporated milk". I got about 200 hits (a lot of desserts) in the search results.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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