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cheeseandchocolate

Popovers!

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What Makes Perfect Popovers?

This morning I found this article on Sfgate and thought some people might find it useful or the recipes of some interest.

http://www.sfgate.com/recipes/article/Baker-s-quest-What-makes-perfect-popovers-4601293.php

For the record I tried this SF Chron recipe last summer when that article appeared. It is very eggy, and I prefer my popovers less so. I don't know if it would have been better with just 2 eggs instead of 3, but I didn't try it again.

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For the record I tried this SF Chron recipe last summer when that article appeared. It is very eggy, and I prefer my popovers less so. I don't know if it would have been better with just 2 eggs instead of 3, but I didn't try it again.

That's good to know - about the egginess - perhaps exchanging a whole egg for the whites might also help - just thinking aloud ...


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Thanks for the recipe Shel_B.

No big deal for me if the popover pan goes in the dishwasher. Mine goes in all the time and works fine after a good soak.

My motto is, if stuff can handle a 400 degree oven and if it can't handle an occasional dishwasher run -- then, out it goes. No big deal.

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And I want a table for two and a chicken for eight o'clock.

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Thanks for the recipe Shel_B.

No big deal for me if the popover pan goes in the dishwasher. Mine goes in all the time and works fine after a good soak.

My motto is, if stuff can handle a 400 degree oven and if it can't handle an occasional dishwasher run -- then, out it goes. No big deal.

It is not the temperature, and it is not the detergent which can damage the coating.

It is the possible of banging and abrasion from other items when agitated by high speed water jets which can scratch the non-stick surface.

dcarch

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Flour Choice for Popovers: I've read that AP flour is fine for popovers, and I've also come across some recipes and articles that suggest using bread flour. What are your thoughts on the best choice for popovers if the desired result is good height and a degree of lightness.

Trader Joe's AP flour contains malted barley flour (or some such similar description). I don't know how much it contains. Could the addition of barley flour effect the results when used in popovers, and how so?

Thanks!


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Trader Joe's AP flour contains malted barley flour (or some such similar description). I don't know how much it contains. Could the addition of barley flour effect the results when used in popovers, and how so?

I believe malted barley flour is a common ingredient in all purpose flours. With the purpose of promoting rise and browning it would seem to be a positive for your application. The diastatic malt powder is often added by bakers http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/diastatic-malt-powder-16-oz

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I believe malted barley flour is a common ingredient in all purpose flours. With the purpose of promoting rise and browning it would seem to be a positive for your application. The diastatic malt powder is often added by bakers http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/diastatic-malt-powder-16-oz

I noticed the ingredient listed on a bag of KA four today. and figured it couldn't be too bad. KA flour seems to have a good reputation. Thanks for explaining what it does.


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I went with a friend to a restaurant in Costa Mesa a few years ago that served giant cheesy popovers that were baked in large coffee mugs.

And they were served right in the mugs. They were the same size mugs in which they served caffe lattes.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I went with a friend to a restaurant in Costa Mesa a few years ago that served giant cheesy popovers that were baked in large coffee mugs.

And they were served right in the mugs. They were the same size mugs in which they served caffe lattes.

I want to try making a small batch in mugs in the Breville oven. I can't fit my new popover pan in the small Breville, but the oven can certainly hold a couple-three coffee mugs.

Meanwhile, I used your recipe to make a batch this afternoon - in fact, they're still in the oven, got another ten minutes or so to go. My-O-My, they sure did rise high, popovers reaching up to the sky ... and it looks like they are going to turn out just fine. Unfortunately, filling the cups about half full allowed for only five popovers. No big deal, but a bit of a surprise. I can see the scenario for the next batch: more batter filling six of the pan's cups, plus extra to make in the Breville.

Mmmm ... the apartment smells so good right now.

Thanks for all your help with this project.

ETA: Oh, I should add that instead of regular butter or shortening, I used some homemade lavender-infused ghee, and the subtle flavor notes from the lavender add a nice quality to the lightness of the ppovers.


Edited by Shel_B (log)
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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Well, here's my first batch of popovers ... they sure did Pop! and they are very light and airy.

Popovers on Cutting Board.jpg

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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Popover Problems: Having had a chance to examine carefully my results, it's clear there were some problems with the popovers I made. First, I could only get five popovers from andiesenji's recipe, and that's a puzzlement to me. I filled the cups in the pan to between 1/2 and 2/3 the way full. Actually, the first cup I filled was about 2/3 the way full and the rest closer to half. Any thoughts on why I couldn't get six popovers from the recipe? Might the cups in my pan have had more capacity than those in andiesenji's pan?

Of bigger concern is how thin the popovers were. Of course the popovers were light and airy - they were completely hollow and the crust was very thin to the point where I could actually see through the crust on a couple of the popovers. There was a very thin layer of custardy innards which had a good texture and taste, but there wasn't much of it at all. My first thought was that I didn't use enough flour, having sifted the flour into the measuring cup. The next time I make these I'll add some more flour, perhaps two tablespoons more. Might that be a step towards correcting the problem?

Finally, two of the popovers actually had a small, circular hole in their bottom, big enough that I could insert the tip of my little finger into it. What's that all about?

ETA: I should mention that I used 1 cup low fat milk, 1 (sifted) cup of flour, 2 beaten eggs, 1.5 tsp salt, and 1 Tbs melted ghee, plus some vegetable oil to grease the cups. Preheated the pan before adding the batter, baked at 450°-F for about 15-minutes, reduced heat to 350°-F and continued baking until the popovers were nicely browned, about 20-minutes more, +/-

Any thoughts on what went wrong, suggestions on how to correct the problems? Thanks!


Edited by Shel_B (log)
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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I've always thought of popovers and Yorkshire puddings as basically the same. The only difference was the addition of a little melted butter to the batter for popovers.

If I want popovers for breakfast I just use the same recipe that I use for Yorkshire PUdding.

One cup flour, one cup milk, three eggs and salt.

8th of a inch of drippings or fat in the bottom of each cup, heated until smoking hot. Pour in the batter and bake about 25 minutes at 450°F.

Yorkshire%20Puddings%20December%2026th%2

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And this is what you'll get, using popover dough to make pizza. Not bad actually.

Interesting the dish shape happened naturally.

dcarch

popoverpizza2.jpg

popoverpizza3.jpg

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Popover Problems: Having had a chance to examine carefully my results, it's clear there were some problems with the popovers I made. First, I could only get five popovers from andiesenji's recipe, and that's a puzzlement to me. I filled the cups in the pan to between 1/2 and 2/3 the way full. Actually, the first cup I filled was about 2/3 the way full and the rest closer to half. Any thoughts on why I couldn't get six popovers from the recipe? Might the cups in my pan have had more capacity than those in andiesenji's pan?

Of bigger concern is how thin the popovers were. Of course the popovers were light and airy - they were completely hollow and the crust was very thin to the point where I could actually see through the crust on a couple of the popovers. There was a very thin layer of custardy innards which had a good texture and taste, but there wasn't much of it at all. My first thought was that I didn't use enough flour, having sifted the flour into the measuring cup. The next time I make these I'll add some more flour, perhaps two tablespoons more. Might that be a step towards correcting the problem?

Finally, two of the popovers actually had a small, circular hole in their bottom, big enough that I could insert the tip of my little finger into it. What's that all about?

ETA: I should mention that I used 1 cup low fat milk, 1 (sifted) cup of flour, 2 beaten eggs, 1.5 tsp salt, and 1 Tbs melted ghee, plus some vegetable oil to grease the cups. Preheated the pan before adding the batter, baked at 450°-F for about 15-minutes, reduced heat to 350°-F and continued baking until the popovers were nicely browned, about 20-minutes more, +/-

Any thoughts on what went wrong, suggestions on how to correct the problems? Thanks!

Your popovers look lovely.

I can't give you a real answer until I try making a batch using your method. I've never had a problem getting 6 popovers - it's possible the pan I have has cups that are narrower at the bottom or I put a bit less in each cup. I but a bit in each cup and then go back and add more so there is an even amount of batter in each cup.

They do have thin walls with big holes inside - which is what I expect with popovers - especially when I want to fill them.

I can't explain the hole in the bottom - mine have a hole in the side where I perforate them to let the hot air escape.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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And this is what you'll get, using popover dough to make pizza. Not bad actually.

Interesting the dish shape happened naturally.

dcarch

popoverpizza2.jpg

popoverpizza3.jpg

So you poured the batter in a shallow bowl...cooked it a bit and then topped it ?

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I made popover dough, poured in a 14" frying pan and baked.

The flat dough started to "climb" the curved side of the pan as it was being baked and formed the interesting shape in the picture.

Then I put all the stuff on it and baked until the cheese melted.

dcarch

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Rosemary-Olive Oil Popovers: I was wondering if extra virgin olive oil would be an acceptable replacement for butter (or shortening) as the fat to mix into the popover batter. I'd like to make a rosemary-olive oil infused popover. America's Test Kitchen, or maybe Cook's Illustrated, suggested that using full fat milk may inhibit the rise in their popovers because the milk was "too heavy" with fat. Might rosemary infused olive oil have that same effect?

Also, since popovers depend, at least in part, on steam (as I understand it) to give them their rise, would a higher fat butter, which has less water than a typical American supermarket butter, inhibit rising to some degree?

Thanks!


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I thought I'd bump this up and see if I can get an answer to the question:

Rosemary-Olive Oil Popovers: I was wondering if extra virgin olive oil would be an acceptable replacement for butter (or shortening) as the fat to mix into the popover batter. I'd like to make a rosemary-olive oil infused popover. America's Test Kitchen, or maybe Cook's Illustrated, suggested that using full fat milk may inhibit the rise in their popovers because the milk was "too heavy" with fat. Might rosemary infused olive oil have that same effect?

Also, since popovers depend, at least in part, on steam (as I understand it) to give them their rise, would a higher fat butter, which has less water than a typical American supermarket butter, inhibit rising to some degree?

Thanks!

Finally, since CI suggests that full-fat milk may inhibit rising, how might a non-fat milk work? Would it be an OK choice for popovers, or is some milk fat necessary to make the recipe(s) work? Since there's fat in the butter or shortening, it would seem that non-fat milk could work. Could the lack of milk fat in non-fat milk be somehow compensated by using a butter with a higher butterfat percentage?


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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How far in advance can I make a popover batter and store it in the fridge?  Can it keep for 16 to 24 hours?  I suppose it would need a couple of hours to come up to room temp before baking.


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Popover batter takes 3 minutes to make, so why bother?

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BLT Steak recipe, google it, works everytime. Because the gruyere popover is salty, a compound butter with a berry, sorghum , or honey is great!

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