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Ive recently been using more whole spices and herbs  , from Penzey's

 

to boost the flavor of some of my items from Target.

 

i have a M&P somewhere in the basement , where things go to get lost.

 

i got this one first ;

 

EZ-Grip Silicone & Porcelain Mortar and Pestle With Non-Slip Detachable Silicone Base - NEW DESIGN BEST FOR GUACAMOLE - Dishwasher Safe by Cooler Kitchen

 

then the 6 " inch one seemed large for doing small amounts.

 

by the time the 4.5 " arrived , Id gotten used to the 6 ".   

 

Im posting because i like them both a lot :

 

DSC08720.thumb.jpg.0b789d94c1e9ad09cfd9af61ff9247d2.jpg

 

the 4.5 ' is just easier to handle when Im doing a Tablespoon or so for an individual dish.

 

these are not Oxo , but they ahh taken on the Oxo look.   the back bottom easily coms off and

 

provided a decent non-skid surface.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I've been looking into getting a mortar/pestle.  Right now, I have a very small marble one that I got as a gift like 20 years ago - but it's way too small - either things jump out or I have to pound things in batches...  I've been looking into either a Thai style one (similar to @heidih linked above) or an Indonesian style, which is more flat with an L-shaped pestle... like this: https://www.indofoodstore.com/stone-mortar-and-pestle-ulekan-and-cobek-9.aspx    I saw the Indonesian style one used a lot to make sambal or chili pastes while in Yogyakarta, but I don't know how effective it would be on tougher stuff like pounding lemongrass or galangal into a paste.

 

I'm not going to get one until after I move (at least 2 months away) but my internal debate goes on.

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i had an interesting discussion w my dentists way back when

 

M&P's made out of granular stone , like granite etc

 

sometimes leave tiny stone chips in your grind.   over time , not so good for your Enamel .

 

marble is probably not granular .

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@KennethT  I like watching people use the rectangular more flat one for "muscular grinding". Makes sense for tougher stuff. You can get more action.  I think I see it more in SEcAssian cultures. Do you know the name?

 

@rotuts Well my husband brought me a volcanic molcajete from Mexico. I did the whole rice grinding to remove grit. I tossed it. I think it was a "tourist model". At least the marlin was good ;)

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20 minutes ago, heidih said:

@KennethT  I like watching people use the rectangular more flat one for "muscular grinding". Makes sense for tougher stuff. You can get more action.  I think I see it more in SEcAssian cultures. Do you know the name?

Indonensia, they call it a cobek and ulek.

 

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I have been addicted to them for decades, ever turn down a well-used/loved one at flea or garage sale.    Have sold off and given away several and am down to an olive wood one my parents bought me at the Seattle /world's Fair and 5 assorted sized marble ones;     I love looking at them and thinking about their past.   

 

Me, I use an electric coffee grinder, $1 at garage sale.

eGullet member #80.

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I also use s whirly style coffee grinder

 

one for ' hot ' blends . one for ' non-hot ' blends

 

but Im grinding about 3 tsp or less a time.  

 

so these work well for me.  one would have been fine for this puirpose

 

but I posted as I really like both and this style

 

of note , the smaller was cheaper  not on amazon , and had free shipping and was 18 dollars.

 

i may have got the last one from that vendor , sorry !

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

I've been looking into getting a mortar/pestle.  Right now, I have a very small marble one that I got as a gift like 20 years ago - but it's way too small - either things jump out or I have to pound things in batches...  I've been looking into either a Thai style one (similar to @heidih linked above) or an Indonesian style, which is more flat with an L-shaped pestle... like this: https://www.indofoodstore.com/stone-mortar-and-pestle-ulekan-and-cobek-9.aspx    I saw the Indonesian style one used a lot to make sambal or chili pastes while in Yogyakarta, but I don't know how effective it would be on tougher stuff like pounding lemongrass or galangal into a paste.

 

I'm not going to get one until after I move (at least 2 months away) but my internal debate goes on.

 

That would be one of the ultimate tests: lemon grass.

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18 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

 

That would be one of the ultimate tests: lemon grass.

I use my microplane zester on it. Generally I don't make pastes so it's fine enough at this point, but it would pound up pretty easily in the ol' M 'n' P afterwards.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I have a 1950's era laboratory mortar and pestle. Not big, maybe 4" internal bowl. High fired, looks like porcelain. Rescued it during a lab facility closure, lots of lab grade equipment going in the dumpster. A shame I didn't think about acquiring other items.  

Not sure what it was used for, but other than the tail I'm growing there have been no ill effects from it's former use.

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22 minutes ago, CentralMA said:

I have a 1950's era laboratory mortar and pestle. Not big, maybe 4" internal bowl. High fired, looks like porcelain. Rescued it during a lab facility closure, lots of lab grade equipment going in the dumpster. A shame I didn't think about acquiring other items.  

Not sure what it was used for, but other than the tail I'm growing there have been no ill effects from it's former use.

 

Nice save. Sure just a tail ') (worked in a lot of labs - heaven only know the exposure - really thought the fume hood was working?and I was just supervising construction)  With lemongrass ideally I grow it and get it at a more tender stage but from a store I use the kitchen scissors and cut it into maybe 1/4" bits. Then I take the M&P outside (grenade issue) and sit on a stool.  Gives, for me, a better leverage. All said I still prefer doing by hand. A primal thing perhaps.

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

Ive recently been using more whole spices and herbs  , from Penzey's

 

to boost the flavor of some of my items from Target.

 

And I should have added if you want to really add another dimension to the spices find an Indian grocery store and find a stovetop spice and nut toasting vessel. I found one years ago that looked good, heavy carbon steel, capacity of about a half cup or so. Doesn't work so well on my current electric coil cooktop due to the rounded bottom, but soon I'll have my gas stove in operation, it'll be fine.

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@CentralMA 

 

excellent points

 

very valid in the Previous Epoc :  PreC19

 

I enjoyed all this this ' pre ' at various very fine

 

Indian marts in my area.

 

thanks  for your post

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2 hours ago, MokaPot said:

 

That would be one of the ultimate tests: lemon grass.

While my grocery store lemongrass is typically tough and fibrous (and not very juicy... I can't wait till my plant starts to fill in a bit!), the galangal I get is even worse - it's like a chunk of wood!

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25 minutes ago, KennethT said:

While my grocery store lemongrass is typically tough and fibrous (and not very juicy... I can't wait till my plant starts to fill in a bit!), the galangal I get is even worse - it's like a chunk of wood!

 

But that is normal in my experience SO much more dense than ginger. Wishing you the best for your grass. When I sold it at the botanic garden people were confused cuz it did not look like the thick pale stalks from the store. Though....I propagated from grocery store stock in water jars in a greenhouse.. Life - never a dull moment or a new chance to learn. 

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11 hours ago, heidih said:

 

 Well my husband brought me a volcanic molcajete from Mexico. I did the whole rice grinding to remove grit. I tossed it. I think it was a "tourist model". At least the marlin was good ;)

I purchased one of those 10 or 15 years ago (not sure where from).  Then we moved.  I could not find it afterwards, and purchased a granite one off Amazon.  Soooo much better!  A few months ago, I found the old one in a mis-labeled box ( after 4.5 years).  It is doing nothing but taking up counter space.   I really should toss it.

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1 hour ago, donk79 said:

I purchased one of those 10 or 15 years ago (not sure where from).  Then we moved.  I could not find it afterwards, and purchased a granite one off Amazon.  Soooo much better!  A few months ago, I found the old one in a mis-labeled box ( after 4.5 years).  It is doing nothing but taking up counter space.   I really should toss it.

 

It looks pretty on the counter with some colorful citrus or stone fruit in it ;) Or more auténtico for avocados

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980015165_Mortarandpestlex2.jpeg.daaedf44a56369101ddb36913f19424f.jpeg

 

These 2 do the job for me. One on the left is granite (8 lbs) and easily handles lemongrass.  I guess the small one on the right is marble - the one I use for a couple of teaspoons of whole spices.

 

@KennethT I'm pretty sure the Mosco St. store has big Thai mortar and pestles. They weigh a friggin' ton.

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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12 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

I have the 7" version, which is pretty beastly at around 14 pounds (with the pestle). If my bathroom scale is to be trusted, that is... my kitchen one couldn't handle the mass. The 9" one they sell must be insane. For a while, these seemed to be the mortar and pestles that got all the press. After Grant Achatz gave a positive review, I was sold. 

 

I don't use it as much as I should, but it does look great on the counter. I mostly use it to bash up anchovies and garlic for caesar dressing or to bash up some peanuts, but I will make a pesto every once in a blue moon (though I mostly use the food processor for that). If I lived somewhere with better access to ingredients, I'd make my own curry pastes with some frequency. I actually got the M&P just after the Next: Thailand and Pok Pok cookbooks came out and I was hoping to put some Thai dishes in my recipe rotation, but that never happened. Maybe someday I'll live somewhere you don't have to mail order galangal, cilantro root, or kaffir lime leaves.

Edited by btbyrd (log)
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43 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

After Grant Achatz gave a positive review, I was sold. 

 

. Maybe someday I'll live somewhere you don't have to mail order galangal, cilantro root, or kafir lime leaves.

I’m in good company.

 

Thailand?

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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