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For anyone interested in marble, Marmotecnica, the company in Carrara from whom I bought my Carrara mortar, still has some stock, although most of their mortars seem to be sold out.  They don't say why, maybe having to do with the pandemic.

 

The most generous size still available is the 30 cm.  The 35 cm mortar is sold out.  Just as well as it weighs 40 kg.

 

Anyhow, I can recommend the company, I had a good experience.

https://www.marmotecnica.com/

 

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I have 5—I like granite the best.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I have a relatively small porcelain one.

All I use that one for is turning curing salt and salt into a powder when dry curing—it'll stick to the meat better.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Ordered Sunday August 16th at approximately 6:45pm. Received August 20th at 11:13am. It’s much nicer than I expected! I had no hopes of receiving it in less than a couple of weeks at best, based on recent experience with other online sellers.

Weighed it on my “very close” OXO scale, it comes in at 5.352 kg or 11 lbs 12.79 oz.

 

Happy camper!!

6B877970-7B45-4698-BD93-4C7574031012.jpeg

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47 minutes ago, DesertTinker said:

Ordered Sunday August 16th at approximately 6:45pm. Received August 20th at 11:13am. It’s much nicer than I expected! I had no hopes of receiving it in less than a couple of weeks at best, based on recent experience with other online sellers.

Weighed it on my “very close” OXO scale, it comes in at 5.352 kg or 11 lbs 12.79 oz.

 

Happy camper!!

 

Lovely - still can't find mine but it is in the dang garage. I got super lustful when I saw the Serious Eats post this morning  https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2020/08/panang-curry-paste.html

 

Prik Gaeng Panang (Thai Panang Curry Paste) RecipePrik Gaeng Panang (Thai Panang Curry Paste) Recipe

Edited by heidih (log)
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2 minutes ago, heidih said:

Lovely - still can't find mine but it is in the dang garage. I got super lustful when I saw the Serious Eats post this morning  https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2020/08/panang-neua-thai-panang-curry-with-beef.html

I think we have the same style of garage. It has little to do with automobiles... more like a storage locker. 🤣

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1 minute ago, DesertTinker said:

I think we have the same style of garage. It has little to do with automobiles... more like a storage locker. 🤣

 

It is huge but the ancient one (98 today) pushes everything together. I finally found a book this morning but my injured scabby knee is bleeding. Telling some men about reality is pissing in the wind. Grrr. 

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45 minutes ago, DesertTinker said:

I momentarily forgot you have “helpers” so to speak. I’m sure it doesn’t help that he’s an old “Old World” man. AKA I’m in charge! Always!

 

And you went to college, law school and grad school but I know everything. I am NOT frustrated  Thanks for you understanding. 

Edited by heidih (log)
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On 8/16/2020 at 8:48 AM, weinoo said:

 

I have the 8" version and while I don't use it super frequently, I've been very pleased with it.

 

I also have one of their ceramic mortars for making som tam; honestly, I use the pestle from that more than the mortar, as it makes a good muddler.

 

I have found myself making sure it's placed on the counter directly above the break between cabinets to minimize vibration. This is probably less of an issue for people with heavy counters.

 

One or two of my many IKEA HEAT trivets usually goes underneath to further contain the "pok pok pok."

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On 8/16/2020 at 8:33 PM, btbyrd said:

 

Maybe someday I'll live somewhere you don't have to mail order galangal, cilantro root, or kaffir lime leaves.

 

 

They all freeze *really* well, for what it's worth. Slicing the galangal before freezing makes it a lot easier to deal with.

Weirdly the cilantro roots are the hardest for me to source. Hit or miss from the same places. I think the cilantro comes from the supplier with the roots and some places just chop them off. They seem to be the least important, though -- if I can't find them, I just use stems.

 

For normal curries, though, I am generally pretty happy with well-sourced, made-in-Thailand commercial pastes. The scratch green curry paste I made was good but not nearly enough better to justify the effort. I mostly save the ingredients for less common pastes like hung lay that aren't as readily available.

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21 minutes ago, dtremit said:

 

They all freeze *really* well, for what it's worth. Slicing the galangal before freezing makes it a lot easier to deal with.

Weirdly the cilantro roots are the hardest for me to source. Hit or miss from the same places. I think the cilantro comes from the supplier with the roots and some places just chop them off. They seem to be the least important, though -- if I can't find them, I just use stems.

 

image.png.c1c9eb8fe29628a1993764dfe23fa6b4.png

 

1735501316_Thaiingredients08-18IMG_1903.jpeg.19c35324a095c457e943c69ab875411e.jpeg

 

And already frozen.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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30 minutes ago, dtremit said:

 

They all freeze *really* well, for what it's worth. Slicing the galangal before freezing makes it a lot easier to deal with.

Weirdly the cilantro roots are the hardest for me to source. Hit or miss from the same places. I think the cilantro comes from the supplier with the roots and some places just chop them off. They seem to be the least important, though -- if I can't find them, I just use stems.

 

For normal curries, though, I am generally pretty happy with well-sourced, made-in-Thailand commercial pastes. The scratch green curry paste I made was good but not nearly enough better to justify the effort. I mostly save the ingredients for less common pastes like hung lay that aren't as readily available.

I never tried freezing galangal presliced - I always worried about it drying out or getting freezer burn.  In the Pok Pok book, Andy Ricker recommends freezing the galangal whole (or in chunks of manageable length) adn then slicing while still frozen to add to the mortar.  I've done this and it works pretty well.  Especially when the only galangal I can get is already frozen...

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19 minutes ago, weinoo said:

It'll be interesting to see how well it freezes in slices, as that's how I did it.  But wrapped very, very well.

 

You are good if your freezer is good

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22 hours ago, KennethT said:

I never tried freezing galangal presliced - I always worried about it drying out or getting freezer burn.  In the Pok Pok book, Andy Ricker recommends freezing the galangal whole (or in chunks of manageable length) adn then slicing while still frozen to add to the mortar.  I've done this and it works pretty well.  Especially when the only galangal I can get is already frozen...


I've noticed that the galangal I can buy fresh is way more "mature" and fibrous than the stuff I have bought pre-frozen -- the fresh stuff is sometimes a challenge to slice through at room temp. I'd be a little afraid to try to do it frozen solid, though maybe the freezing helps break up the fibers.

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1 minute ago, dtremit said:


I've noticed that the galangal I can buy fresh is way more "mature" and fibrous than the stuff I have bought pre-frozen -- the fresh stuff is sometimes a challenge to slice through at room temp. I'd be a little afraid to try to do it frozen solid, though maybe the freezing helps break up the fibers.

 

Grated maybe?  but do not think freezing breaks down that stuff.  

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4 minutes ago, dtremit said:


I've noticed that the galangal I can buy fresh is way more "mature" and fibrous than the stuff I have bought pre-frozen -- the fresh stuff is sometimes a challenge to slice through at room temp. I'd be a little afraid to try to do it frozen solid, though maybe the freezing helps break up the fibers.

I've done it - I kind of saw through it with a big chef knife and shave off bit by bit.  Or, if I have a big enough piece to hold on to, I'll use the chef's knife like a cleaver and hack off pieces.  It's woody in the best of times.... when I move, I'm considering adding it to my stable of plants - I gather it grows pretty easily.

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8 minutes ago, dtremit said:


I've noticed that the galangal I can buy fresh is way more "mature" and fibrous than the stuff I have bought pre-frozen -- the fresh stuff is sometimes a challenge to slice through at room temp. I'd be a little afraid to try to do it frozen solid, though maybe the freezing helps break up the fibers.

 

2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

I've done it - I kind of saw through it with a big chef knife and shave off bit by bit.  Or, if I have a big enough piece to hold on to, I'll use the chef's knife like a cleaver and hack off pieces.  It's woody in the best of times.... when I move, I'm considering adding it to my stable of plants - I gather it grows pretty easily.

 

After peeling, I also used a big chef's knife - you just want to make sure you have a flat side to keep steady on the cutting board. My friend at Hot Thai Kitchen does a good job...

 

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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32 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

 

After peeling, I also used a big chef's knife - you just want to make sure you have a flat side to keep steady on the cutting board. My friend at Hot Thai Kitchen does a good job...

 

 

 

That is a pretty fresh looking one. 

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