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Caramel - How to make it more runny

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3 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Were you following Kerry Beal's recipe (discussed earlier)?  If you are getting 225F after adding the cream and if you are adding the amount prescribed in whatever recipe you are following, then you can let the caramelized sugar sit a bit before adding the cream. I have one recipe in which the caramel reaches its final temp very quickly. In that recipe (it's for apple caramel), the liquid added is a mixture of cream and melted apple cider jelly. Since it's the same proportions as for other caramels I make, the only explanation I have come up with is that it has to do with using jelly plus cream (so more liquid than using just cream). But I don't think the explanation makes sense, and I remain puzzled. In any event, when the apple caramel reaches its final temp (as I said, almost immediately), it is still rather fluid, but it tests as done (a bit beyond soft-ball stage), and when it firms up, it is the perfect texture for piping.

Wouldn’t jelly have less water than cream? So it reaches the final temp sooner because there is far less water to boil out? 

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Hi all - I have a question - I am making some caramels that I want to dip in chocolate and I am wondering how much chocolate per caramel I should be budgeting for - I haven't paid close enough attention in the past when dipping caramels to know.  I think the last time I did a batch I tempered 1kg of chocolate to dip 140 caramels and had 300 g left over (saved to use for ganache)  I am asking as I am aiming to make 1800 pieces for an event and wonder if I have enough chocolate of if I should get some more.   (that was for a super bowl party I attended by 20 people and there were no caramels left by the end of the game - I was shocked - I only had 2)

 

I think that works out to about 5 g of chocolate per caramel, or 9 kg total -  I have on hand between bitter, dark and milk chocolate

 

Anyone here with more experience dipping chocolates who can give me an idea of how much chocolate per piece would be much appreciated.

TIA

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What are the dimensions of your caramels?  5 g sounds like enough for a small piece but better safe than sorry. If you end up with an extra kg or two of chocolate, Christmas is coming soon enough. 

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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

What are the dimensions of your caramels?  5 g sounds like enough for a small piece but better safe than sorry. If you end up with an extra kg or two of chocolate, Christmas is coming soon enough. 

Hi pastrygirl - thx for weighing in - they are a 1" round dome - hopefully I make as many as planned and I sell out but if not, I do have a back up plan to sell any left overs.

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On 7/12/2019 at 4:08 PM, Bentley said:

If you look back in the forum to my early days, I once had an issue with a cherry caramel separating.  Never figured out why.  But I've never had a caramel separate since then.  

I take the caramel off the heat as soon as it hits my temp, then let it rest for maybe 5 minutes before putting the butter in.  I am certainly not an expert in emulsification, but it makes sense that the blender would help emulsify the mixture, as the blades are creating smaller and smaller particles of fat to be suspended in the water.   

 

@Bentley, I've been waiting to post regarding your technique of using an immersion blender to add the butter at the end of making a caramel as a way of avoiding the issue of having the butter separate out. I wanted to make sure I had given this idea a fair test. So now I am writing to thank you for this suggestion. I have used a blender for every caramel I have made since then, and so far there has been no more separation of butter. It helped to think of adding the butter as similar to making a ganache, adding fat to the caramel, which does have some fat in it but is basically a liquid. My only concern is how robust my blender will prove to be since the caramel thickens as time passes. Maybe I need to look for an industrial stick blender if there is such a thing. Thank you very much for this suggestion.


Edited by Jim D. (log)
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My recipe is based on someone else's award winning caramel sauce for ice cream and it's so easy to fill the truffles.  The filling needs o set up before you cap them. If you use clarified butter the consistency will be more velvety and they set up within a half hour.

 

My ratios are 5 parts sugar to 3 parts cream to 3 parts (clarified) butter.

I cook the sugar over 300 degrees before adding the butter then I take it off the burner and add the cream. You want the caramel dark brown but not black before you add the butter. If it smells like it's burning it is and creates a most wonderful taste.

I don't even use a thermometer any more. I go by look and smell.

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On 11/7/2019 at 9:37 PM, Jim D. said:

I wanted to make sure I had given this idea a fair test. So now I am writing to thank you for this suggestion. I have used a blender for every caramel I have made since then, and so far there has been no more separation of butter. It helped to think of adding the butter as similar to making a ganache, adding fat to the caramel, which does have some fat in it but is basically a liquid.

 

Cream is a fat in water emulsion, butter is a water in fat emulsion.

The base for caramel is caramelized sugar + cream, so it's a fat in water emulsion. Then you add butter, which is the other kind of emulsion. So you need to reverse the phase of the butter, transforming it from water in fat to fat in water. This takes a good amount of mixing, which you get easily with an immersion blender, but takes a lot of time by hand. You don't see by eye if you reversed all the butter. If you left a part of not-reversed butter (still water in fat) then this will separate.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Beware that there are good and bad immersion blenders not just about sturdiness, but also about geometry. Some blenders add lots of small air bubbles to what you are blending, others do not, it's a matter of the geometry of the blades and the rest of the mixing unit. For chocolate making you want to avoid added air bubbles like hell. So ask beforehand to someone who has the model you want to buy, or try it first hand before spending money.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Thanks for the link. Do you have a brand you would recommend?  The prices suggest these blenders are indeed heavy-duty appliances--or at least should be.

I am not the most experienced chocolatier in the world, but I've seen Waring immersion blenders in 90% of the commercial kitchens I've been in.

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21 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Thanks for the link. Do you have a brand you would recommend?  The prices suggest these blenders are indeed heavy-duty appliances--or at least should be.

 

19 hours ago, Bentley said:

I am not the most experienced chocolatier in the world, but I've seen Waring immersion blenders in 90% of the commercial kitchens I've been in.

 

Yes, either a small Waring or a Bamix should be heavier duty.

 https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B008ND7KYU/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_K8cYDbJ2D0E54

 

 

 

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