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Customer wanting me to produce handwritten "I love Jamie Fraser" (some Outlander nonsense lol) on chocolate bars. 

 

Apart from my handwriting being terrible  I'm struggling to write it on without making a mess. I've put chocolate in a oipi g bag and cut a small hole, but it is inconsistent in coming out. 

 

Any tips or tools to be able to write more consistently? In UK. 

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Edited by SchiehallionHandmade (log)

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How fluid is your chocolate? Cut a very very small tip off your piping bag or cone, it'll be easier to control even if you want to make larger letters. Also, before piping, clear any solidified chocolate that's in the tip by squeezing it, that will help with smooth and consistent flow. 

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Well, this might sound a little counter-intuitive, but don’t move too slow - the slower you move to try to “make it look as nice as possible” the clunkier it will end up in the end ... the faster you move tends for a nicer more even flow - hold the bag straight up and down two handed (for steadiness) directly above your surface and just write. 

 

Try cutting a smaller hole, also - looks a little thick for writing.

 

Does your client want print or cursive?

 

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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practice. lots and lots of practice.

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Use a parchment or coated parchment bag, a small one.  You will have more control with a smaller bag.  Practice writing by placing a template (make one in Word in whatever font you want) on a  flat surface, then place a piece of parchment on top and practice, practice, practice.  Just scrape it up each time and remelt it.  Some people find it helpful to have a "beat" in their head as they pipe (be it in chocolate or buttercream); Margaret Braun says in her CakeWalk book that repeating a rhyme helps (with this little rhyme, I can pipe a nice line -  kind of thing) with piping.

 

Your chocolate looks like it is a little more fluid (due to the spread of the lines), maybe let it cool a bit before you pipe.  What kind of chocolate you using (some manufacturers make a "writing chocolate" which is kind of like coating chocolate)?  I use regular bittersweet to write messages on cakes but admit to using the Felchlin ultra rondos for white because we have it and it is less of a hassle to melt a little bit of that in a deli container in the microwave than to use white chocolate.....

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I've always found it much easier using a very small paper cone - no more than about 10-15cm long.  It makes it more like writing with a pen.

 

Also, you can put the tip directly onto the surface and write like a pen, too.

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Thanks all for your suggestions. It looks like a small paper icing bag is the way ahead. 

 

I'm using the same chocolate I use for the bars, Callebaut. 

 

Yes, I'm having to write it back to front, handwriting style, as said it's just going to have to take practise. Or get the wife to do it lol. 

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