Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Quevun

How practical is stir frying with charcoal?

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

Yeah, you can do that with the lowly, $30, Weber Smokey Joe.

There are many ways to snuff out charcoal.

There is nothing lowly about a Smokey Joe, except it's stature.

HC

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, HungryChris said:

There is nothing lowly about a Smokey Joe, except it's stature.

HC

 

Yeah, I was just comparing it to the much more expensive Mini Green Egg.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Either my Kettle, Webber or Kamado bbq's.  Close the lid shut the vents and you have fuel for next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 4/20/2018 at 5:13 PM, Okanagancook said:

I used to have one of these propane units.  It got really, really hot but you could adjust it.  Sounded a bit like a jet engine but not like in a commercial kitchen.  Propane I believe gets hotter than natural gas.  But, it's not a charcoal fire as per the original question.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Fryer-Steel-Stand1-Gas-Stove-Propane-Burner-Portable-Outdoor-Camping-Cooker-NEW1/123042696469?hash=item1ca5ea8d15:g:UT4AAOSwUWBauUhC

 

 

+1.   I have one of these and love it: King Kooker 24WC Heavy-Duty 24-Inch Portable Propane Outdoor Cooker with 18-Inch Steel Wok

 

The first time I used it my oil burst into flames.  I hadn't even started cooking anything yet so it wasn't from a spill.  Lesson learned!  I use a more moderate burner setting now and I don't put anything on it until I am 100% ready to cook - all my ingredients at hand, a clear plan for what I need to do, and a vessel for the finished dish (basic wok protocol).

 

I have a kamado, but it takes a while to get the charcoal hot enough for stir fry.  My weber chimney gets more than hot enough in a hurry, but as @FeChef said, it gets dangerously hot.  I would want to corral it with some sort of fire-safe surround if I were going to wok on it  as it is might be too easy to tip it over.  I have occasionally used one to do quick sear on steak though.


Edited by Smithy Adjusted Amazon link (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Not with the big green egg - you shut the lid and air supply off - charcoal is there for the next time.

But can the charcoal be reused repeatedly?

 

e.g.

1. Light charcoal

2. Stir fry for 2 minutes

3. Extinguish

4. Repeat every day with same charcoal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Quevun said:

But can the charcoal be reused repeatedly?

 

e.g.

1. Light charcoal

2. Stir fry for 2 minutes

3. Extinguish

4. Repeat every day with same charcoal?

 

 Until it dies out.

You can't get something from nothing.

Fire it up, and see what works best for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Quevun said:

But can the charcoal be reused repeatedly?

 

e.g.

1. Light charcoal

2. Stir fry for 2 minutes

3. Extinguish

4. Repeat every day with same charcoal?

 

3 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

 Until it dies out.

You can't get something from nothing.

Fire it up, and see what works best for you.

Like Martin says - until it dies out. Keep in mind there is a preheat time which may be as much as an hour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

 

Like Martin says - until it dies out. Keep in mind there is a preheat time which may be as much as an hour.

 

Or, here I used a small blower, ready to cook in a few seconds.

 

A hair dryer will work well also.

 

dcarch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@dcarch

 

nice

 

what's your full Rx for those Puppies ?

 

pls consider posting in the SV topic ?

 

love the idea of a CharSear  for pulled pork p SV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the BGE I find certain amount of time is required to burn off the volatile organic compounds, or your food will taste like gasoline.

  • Like 2
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TS, so concerned about wasting charcoal. Chimney starter uses about 1lb charcoal. KBB on sale cost about $10 for 2x 18lb bags. You get that chimney starter roaring hot and toss your stir fry in for a minute or two and your done. Want to throw some cold pre cooked rice, with some peas/carrots, and a egg, with some left over chicken, pork, or shrimp? No problem. All with 1lb of KBB. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

 Until it dies out.

You can't get something from nothing.

Fire it up, and see what works best for you.

 

18 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

 

Like Martin says - until it dies out. Keep in mind there is a preheat time which may be as much as an hour.

 

Thanks for your comments, I guess its best if I try it out and see for myself.

 

4 hours ago, FeChef said:

TS, so concerned about wasting charcoal. Chimney starter uses about 1lb charcoal. KBB on sale cost about $10 for 2x 18lb bags. You get that chimney starter roaring hot and toss your stir fry in for a minute or two and your done. Want to throw some cold pre cooked rice, with some peas/carrots, and a egg, with some left over chicken, pork, or shrimp? No problem. All with 1lb of KBB. 

 

Damn, no wonder I couldn't find any article on conserving charcoal, I didn't know it is so cheap in the US.

In the Netherlands, it costs 25 euros ($31) for one 22 lb bag.


Edited by Quevun (log)
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Quevun said:

Damn, no wonder I couldn't find any article on conserving charcoal, I didn't know it is so cheap in the US.

In the Netherlands, it costs 25 euros ($31) for one 22 lb bag.

 

Where do you buy your charcoal?

Just a quick google gives me 18 Euro for 10 kg bag at praxis (restaurant quality?) or 5 kg weber charcoal for 8 Euro..... (also at praxis)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another advantage of conserving charcoal is avoiding the need to more frequently wrestle with large bags of something that will cover you with black dust! And the second time you light your charcoal the VOCs burn off more quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, nasi goreng said:

Where do you buy your charcoal?

Just a quick google gives me 18 Euro for 10 kg bag at praxis (restaurant quality?) or 5 kg weber charcoal for 8 Euro..... (also at praxis)

 

I bought from bol.com. I have to check out praxis next time. Thanks for the tip!

It is still quite a bit more expensive than in the US though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Quevun said:

Damn, no wonder I couldn't find any article on conserving charcoal, I didn't know it is so cheap in the US.

 

If you have access to hardwood, making your own charcoal isn't difficult.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

If you have access to hardwood, making your own charcoal isn't difficult.

 

I know it is possible - but I'd love to hear more about how it is done.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I know it is possible - but I'd love to hear more about how it is done.

There are several ways to make it.

The way I make it is the same way I make biochar (but with larger pieces of wood) which is much more efficient than other methods.

Probably the most popular way involves heating the wood with an external heat source, anaerobically, in a sealed barrel or the like.

Here's a link to how I make biochar: 

https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/homemade-lump-charcoal.137701/#post-949818


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

There are several ways to make it.

The way I make it is the same way I make biochar (but with larger pieces of wood) which is much more efficient than other methods.

Probably the most popular way involves heating the food with an external heat source, anaerobically, in a sealed barrel or the like.

Here's a link to now I make biochar: 

https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/homemade-lump-charcoal.137701/#post-949818

 

Hmmm - wonder if I could do it in my egg - pack the wood tightly - light from the top with a small amount of air through the vent below - once burning put the lid down with the cap off on the top. Once the gas blows off, I could choke down the fire to extinguish. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Hmmm - wonder if I could do it in my egg - pack the wood tightly - light from the top with a small amount of air through the vent below - once burning put the lid down with the cap off on the top. Once the gas blows off, I could choke down the fire to extinguish. 

 

It's worth a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've made small quantities of charcoal by wrapping fruit wood in foil and roasting on a hotplate. Takes  30 minutes. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, gfweb said:

I've made small quantities of charcoal by wrapping fruit wood in foil and roasting on a hotplate. Takes  30 minutes. 

 

Yeah, that's a good way to make char-cloth or char-rope for woodcraft fire starting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Import Food sells a charcoal-fueled "tao" wok burner made from clay and concrete set into a metal bucket. It's the upgrade pick to the budget chimney starter method. 

 

But for sheer convenience and maximum therms (without resorting to forced-air for the charcoal) nothing can beat a high pressure gas powered wok burner. I can't ever imagine choosing charcoal over gas if I had the option.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use this contraption:

It's originally meant for potjies (sort of South African Dutch oven), but it works good for stir frying and also doubles as a small braai...

It's in use for making kebabs here:

17satay.thumb.jpg.926f640ce74dd00a4d53ba66c4f180ca.jpg

I think it measures something like 35 x 35 cm

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×