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Hood recommendation needed for induction cooktop


teapot
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Thanks to the  good folks on Egullet, I will be installing a 36" induction cooktop into my new kitchen. But I am really stumped as to what hood to purchase.  Since induction does not produce the heat and vapor gas does, it does not require high power.  The problem is I'm not able to check these units out in person so am at the mercy of wildly divergent online reviews. Please help!  

 

I'm looking for undercabinet with  400 - 600 cfm. Good light. Reasonably quiet and quietly attractive.  Budget in the $400 - 600. Would love to hear from induction owners about what works for them.

 

 

 

 

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Smoke from grilling or searing will be the only concern when using an induction cooktop. I have a cheap hood about 200 cfm which isn't even ducted to the outside, so I don't do a lot of grilling/searing.

 

p

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Not just smoke - cooking smells. As much as some stuff smells very good cooking, I'm not sure I want my whole house to smell of sautéed onions for hours afterwards, which is what happens if someone cooks without turning on the exhaust fan.

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1 hour ago, quiet1 said:

Not just smoke - cooking smells

 

46 minutes ago, teapot said:

I do a lot of high heat cooking...and also like to cook Indian and other aromatic foods so removing smells is a consideration for me.

 

Also, if one is doing any amount of jam/jelly making or other preserving using waterbath canning, a very steamy kitchen and house can result without good exhaust.  

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5 hours ago, teapot said:

I do a lot of high heat cooking...and also like to cook Indian and other aromatic foods so removing smells is a consideration for me. 

 

Will you be able to vent to the outside? I think this is critical for odor and grease control regardless of the heat source.

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5 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

 

Also, if one is doing any amount of jam/jelly making or other preserving using waterbath canning, a very steamy kitchen and house can result without good exhaust.  

I'll add "cooking off quantities of lobster/crab/crawfish" to that list. A wonderful smell in moderation, but moderation is difficult to achieve if you ever cook 'em in bulk. 

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