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Kerry Beal

Outside the Brown Bag - Taking my Kitchen Toys to Work

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Here's what happens when you pick up a fathead dough pizza that you have on parchment and the parchment tears before you make it over to the plate - 5 second rule.

 

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Little bit of top sirloin, couple of leftover mushrooms from the pizza cooked in the fat rendered from the steak.

 

 

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oops thought it was a 2 second rule. Yes agree  the immediate reaction of scalding heat on hands is to throw them up. Good save :)

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11 minutes ago, heidih said:

oops thought it was a 2 second rule. Yes agree  the immediate reaction of scalding heat on hands is to throw them up. Good save :)

Actually no burns sustained - the paper ripped and it landed face down on the floor. 

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12 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

it landed face down on the floor.


Things almost always do... and the bigger potential mess involved, the lower the odds things will land any other way. :D

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15 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Here's what happens when you pick up a fathead dough pizza that you have on parchment and the parchment tears before you make it over to the plate - 5 second rule.

I understand the five second rule. I understand the two second rule. I understand parchment tearing. What I don’t understand is what the hell is a “fathead dough pizza”

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2 hours ago, Anna N said:

I understand the five second rule. I understand the two second rule. I understand parchment tearing. What I don’t understand is what the hell is a “fathead dough pizza”

Ah - that would be low carb dough 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:


Things almost always do... and the bigger potential mess involved, the lower the odds things will land any other way. :D

Indeed!

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An interesting day at work today - the power was out for several hours this afternoon which interfered with my ability to cook what I wanted - but I got most of what I wanted to do early in the day.

 

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I started with a couple of loaves of Pain Rustique - took the first loaf out for the day shift - just took the second out for the night shift.

 

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Sous vide then pan fried in duck fat this lovely pork chop. 

 

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The experiments with the bagel continue - this is gluten free flour with vital wheat gluten added. I think that this might have potential - I'll cut into it once it's completely cool to see the crumb. I suspect more gluten needed and more water. I know very little about gluten free baking.

 

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10 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Sous vide then pan fried in duck fat this lovely pork chop. 

 

I share your fondness for a decent pork chop.   🙂

 

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52 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

this is gluten free flour with vital wheat gluten added. I think that this might have potential - I'll cut into it once it's completely cool to see the crumb. I suspect more gluten needed and more water. I know very little about gluten free baking.


I know even less about it because I would have thought using gluten free flour then adding vital wheat gluten would have been kinda like using sugar free syrup and adding high fructose corn syrup. 

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34 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


I know even less about it because I would have thought using gluten free flour then adding vital wheat gluten would have been kinda like using sugar free syrup and adding high fructose corn syrup. 

Lol - I can see why it would appear that way!

 

The hubby suffers from gut grief which often interferes with a good night sleep. I've seen a couple of patients who have been put on a low FODMAP diet by gastroenterologists - so we decided to give it a try to see if it would help his discomfort. 

 

It's the wheat fructans in the flour that need to be eliminated in the elimination phase of the diet so gluten free products are recommended. But it turns out that the gluten itself is actually low in fermentable carbohydrates so it occurred to me that if you started with the non wheat starches and added back the gluten for structure that you could make a better textured bread. There was some discussion in the Fresh Loaf website about it with suggestions of how much vital wheat gluten to add per 100 grams of starches so I decided to give it a try.

 

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It had a lovely chewy texture - the nurses made short work of it. I thought there was a bit of an aftertaste - not quite sure where that came from - perhaps the simmering in the malt syrup solution (decided bringing lye to work wasn't the best idea). 

 

 

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36 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

It's the wheat fructans in the flour that need to be eliminated in the elimination phase of the diet so gluten free products are recommended. But it turns out that the gluten itself is actually low in fermentable carbohydrates so it occurred to me that if you started with the non wheat starches and added back the gluten for structure that you could make a better textured bread. There was some discussion in the Fresh Loaf website about it with suggestions of how much vital wheat gluten to add per 100 grams of starches so I decided to give it a try.


That's pretty cool. I've never explored the gluten free world. I just assumed vital wheat gluten for gluten free was like holy water for vampires. 

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24 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


That's pretty cool. I've never explored the gluten free world. I just assumed vital wheat gluten for gluten free was like holy water for vampires. 

It certainly would be for celiacs!

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I admire y'all!

I can't do it!

If it hits the floor, it's headed for the door!

:wink:


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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7 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

If it hits the floor, it's headed for the door!


Me too if it was for someone else. But I tend to be less adherent to that idea when it's something for me. Depends on what it is and where it lands. :D

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A lot of low-carb breads work on a similar pattern, using something like coconut flour to provide the bulk and then adding vital wheat gluten for structure. It's also handy if you want to play around with adding things like quinoa flour or oat flour to your conventional breads but still have a decent crumb.

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Couple of really ripe bananas in the house this morning - seemed a good opportunity to make banana bread. Took the first loaf out hot - nurse Glenn is cutting the last little piece in half, then in half, then in half again. It's going to be a crumb!

 

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Kimchi Jigae - always an easy thing to make in the Instant Pot at work. I'll share the rest with the staff in a few minutes.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Kimchi Jigae


I want to try making that one of these days... if I ever manage to win the battle with what seems to be a complete inability to successfully make a good batch of kimchi. I've tried all kinds of recipes, used all kinds of tips and tricks I managed to dig up here and on google in general... kimchi continues to stick it's tongue out at me and laugh. It always tastes fine but not as kimchi, more as a kimchi-esque salad. It just won't properly ferment.

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Yesterday when I was out dropping off some stuff at Value Village - one of my missions was to find a Nespresso for @Alleguede's new love who is coming from Italy tomorrow. Thought I'd just check and see if there was one in there. Nope - but.. there was a delicator. And god knows I need one.

 

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When I stopped in to Sobey's this am I asked the butcher what he used for his delicated pork - and he pointed me to these very inexpensive pieces. Ran them through a few times, floured, salt and pepper - needed some extra seasoning but didn't have any here.

 

I have a trunk full of vacuum coffee pots - I used to collect them - which of course makes no sense for a girl who doesn't drink coffee. I'm just working on getting some pictures so I can list them on e-bay. The Keurig at work is belly up so I made coffee for the gang today. Of course the vacuum pots are all stainless and not induction compatible - problem solved with an induction skillet under the pot. 

 

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A little disturbing today - making me wonder if it's an omen on my life saving skills.

 

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4 trees full of vultures - and more circling. 

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 Cool haul! Thanks for introducing me to a new word and item -- the delicator! 

Good luck finding that Nespresso for @Alleguede's new love.

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27 minutes ago, curls said:

 Cool haul! Thanks for introducing me to a new word and item -- the delicator! 

Good luck finding that Nespresso for @Alleguede's new love.

Oh I got one - first one at Costco - turns out it doesn’t use the correct capsules - so had to return it and get another at their store.

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I am simply in love with the color. Hey vultures function well ecologically. In my area it is crows/ravens who clean up our roadkill. 

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5 hours ago, heidih said:

I am simply in love with the color. Hey vultures function well ecologically. In my area it is crows/ravens who clean up our roadkill. 

 

Here it's vultures.  Sometimes some crows and eagles.  This week I've been walking past a deer.  Wish they would get on with it.  Temperatures are getting warmer.

 

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

4 trees full of vultures - and more circling. 

 

I don't know if it's the same type of migration, but on Vancouver Island they really have to wait for the right wind currents for their migration, maybe it's the same there in the Spring? It's pretty cool here to see them gather and try to find the right wind patterns. They are kind of beautiful, really. 

 

http://vancouverisland.com/things-to-do-and-see/wildlife-viewing/turkey-vulture-migration/

 

Quote

 

 They are not strong fliers, taking advantage instead of winds and currents of rising warm air to keep them aloft in the search for the carrion on which they almost exclusively feed. (A Turkey Vulture, asked in the airport if he wanted to check the two dead raccoons under his wings, declined, explaining that they were carry-on.)

When these southbound vultures are faced with the Strait, where cool air eliminates those favourable currents, they linger, sometimes for weeks, until conditions are suitable for crossing. It is possible to see many hundreds of Turkey Vultures in the air at once, soaring in flocks called “kettles”, trying to gain enough height to carry them as far across as possible without having to resort to powered flight.

The vultures are joined by good numbers of eagles and hawks, too, although many of these do not wait so long to cross. It is a fascinating sight for all, and for birders it provides an opportunity to see many raptors, and perhaps a chance at something unusual among them.

 

 


Edited by FauxPas (log)

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