Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Creating glazes like Gerald Sattler


Recommended Posts

40 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

Here's an article about this process with RECIPE

 

Those are AMAZING.  The blue donut is so cool.  Do all cakes have to have been frozen mousse cakes to have this glaze applied?  Or could it be any cake that was really well crumb coated?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, gfron1 said:

Here's an article about this process with RECIPE

 

She does make it easier for herself by using a lot of curved-top cakes, eliminating the need to sweep off the top layer.

 

I wonder how she does the blue-white marbling one, though?  That's pretty...

Link to post
Share on other sites

One way to get a perfectly flat surface on a cake is to reverse it  after baking   so that the bottom becomes the top. I've done this when constructing Opera cakes, so that the eventual top chocolate layer is level.  Also with the Valrhona version of a Sachertorte that has a chocolate glaze. With that I discovered the first time that, as gfron1 says above. Every slight blemish is visible once the glaze is applied.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Gflon1,thanks for the article and recipe! This recipe worked well.

This is pretty thick,so I probably need to thin it down to copy gerald butler's swirled marble but it's a good recipe to have.

I did it over the bundt cake. Since it's too hard to do smooth butter cream over the bundt cake,I did pourable chocolate garnache which saved my time and worked well under this recipe.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/14/2016 at 6:52 AM, gfron1 said:

@Lovebaking2125 I also found it to be thick. I'm wondering if there's not a difference between US and EU swtd cond milk. Next time I'll think it some more. Heating it did not thin it very much so that's not the answer.

After I found the video below,here is what I think....

The recipe link you provided with condensed milk is pretty much identical to new video's recipe (except 50g difference in chocoate).

And I think your recipe worked excellent for me as far as copieing Olga's stye glaze. Especially covering a cake with one solid color mirror glaze. 

 

I just couldn't quite deiver the Gerald Sutter style with being so thick. But now we may have an answer ....seems like the top color for the webbing design only have glucose and color (no gelatins etc),according to this video guy.

Anyway,I can't wait to try it!

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Quick question: for those that use the colored, thinned nappage for the effect- do you use white coloring (titanium dioxide) as a base AND the other coloring? Or would you only use the white for a white nappage?

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

First shot. After some experiment, definitely think the TiO2 is necessary to get the opacity like that shown in Sattler's videos. This entremet consists of hazelnut dacquoise topped with feuilletine, Nutella and milk chocolate, chocolate mousse, an insert of chocolate cremeaux, more mousse, topped with chocolate mirroir. The color was made with clear piping gel mixed with 20% water, couple drops of TiO2, and gel color, slightly warmed. Used hair dryer, and I think I need something stronger- a can of compressed air I think. I have a little tweaking to do, but pretty sure I can nail it with a few more runs.

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg

Edited by Patrick S (log)
  • Like 9

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If my memories are correct, one or the other have to have white in it to chemically react.

 

When I did normal Dark chocolate mirror glaze as a base,

Dark chocolate:no white

Colors:add white

 

But when I did white chocolate mirror glaze as a base, I only added white in that. And whatever other colors I added on top didn't need white to make Suttler's effect.

 

I hope this make sence...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm struggling to phrase this question but here goes...

 

A recipe chosen to make as a gift for later in the week has a single colour variant of the finishes so beautifully depicted above.  I need to transport my finished creation and so would welcome advice on the  surface once set.  Is it dry to the touch or sticky?  Will any (gloved) finger mark show up?  

 

I'm guessing if products with such a finish are sold commercially they must be reasonably robust but it would be useful to know in advance if my carefully packed creation is likely to resemble a pig's ear on arrival at its destination  (not that I have any bias against pigs or their ears, but I guess you might know what I mean.

 

Apologies for so many questions on this forum, I look forward to the day when I can offer advice rather than repeatedly seek it!  

 

Many thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, what pastrygirl said. It will be tacky to the touch and will show fingerprints. It is durable, meaning it won't melt off onto your plate, but it will show any damage that is done. For a home baker I would use one of those large tupperware cake domes so nothing gets on it or touches it, plus the dome would retain some of the coolness.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DianaB said:

 

Apologies for so many questions on this forum, I look forward to the day when I can offer advice rather than repeatedly seek it!  

 

 

Thank you for your questions. I often learn as much from questions as I do from answers. Sometimes they teach me another way of looking at things or sometimes they just goad me into side research projects. At any rate, without questions, what purpose would answers serve? :) Keep on asking, please.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...
On 6/4/2016 at 5:23 PM, gfron1 said:

Our farewell cake is done. Kumquat, caramel and spice. I used the recipe in the VIDEO above, thinning the color glaze just slightly with water.farewellcake.jpg

 

 

What is the colored glaze composed of? Just glucose and colors? And what temperature do you have on your colored glaze when applying? :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...