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John DePaula

EZtemper - The Help You Need to Achieve Perfectly Tempered Chocolate FAST!

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Where do you put your molds to rest before going in the fridge?

Do you leave them on the marble? If so, try putting them on a wire rack and force some air circulation with a fan. Big blocks like that have lots of troubles due to the latent heat of crystalization, especially with that indented shape.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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7 minutes ago, teonzo said:

Where do you put your molds to rest before going in the fridge?

Do you leave them on the marble? If so, try putting them on a wire rack and force some air circulation with a fan. Big blocks like that have lots of troubles due to the latent heat of crystalization, especially with that indented shape.

 

 

 

Teo

 

After filling, they go into the vibrating surface and immediately into the fridge

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3 hours ago, felipetruji said:

After filling, they go into the vibrating surface and immediately into the fridge

I usually wait until I see them starting to show signs of crystallizing around the edges before bunging them in the fridge. That is when they are most rapidly crystallizing the the latent heat will be the biggest issue.

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14 hours ago, felipetruji said:

After filling, they go into the vibrating surface and immediately into the fridge

 

You need to consider the geometry of the mold you are using and how to dissipate the heat.

Big molds (like this 1 kg block) mean big width, which means more latent heat to dissipate from the surface. Those squares are separated by deep and narrow interstices, you need to dissipate all the heat that accumulates on the surfaces of those interstices. Problem is that air is an insulator and that mold has a flat surface (the surface of the squares), so if you place the mold on a sheet pan then it's really really difficult for the air in those interstices to circulate. No air circulation means that there is a lot of latent heat accumulating there, causing the chocolate to bloom along those interstices (which is what your photo is showing).

So you need to place your molds on a wire rack and find a way to force air circulation. Usually a fan is a good and inexpensive solution. If you have an air conditioner then put the molds near it.

You need to be careful when and how putting them in the fridge. Putting the molds in the fridge can mean lots of different things. As Kerry wrote, it's better to avoid putting them in the fridge just after molding, you force quick crystalization on the surface while the inside is still fluid, which means when the inside will crystallize it's going to shrink, causing the surface of the chocolate piece to break. So you need to put them in the fridge at the correct time, but also in the correct way. If you place the molds on a flat surface you get the troubles I explained above, so you need to place them on a wire rack even in the fridge, with some space below them otherwise air will not circulate. You need a fridge with good air circulation inside it. You need to place them in the "warmest" side of the fridge.

Since you wrote you have a room at 19°C, then I would suggest to put the molds on wire racks with at least 2 inches of air beneath them, then using a fan near them to force air circulation. That temperature + wire racks + fan should be enough to avoid putting them in the fridge, but leave them alone for a good amount of time (many hours, if not a full day), don't take them out of the mold when they detach, the inside is still crystallizing.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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