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Rice Pilaf Question


Porthos
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Interesting.  Thanks for posting these, I learned something new.

When I think of "pilaf" I think of the dish called "pilaf" from South Asia, SE Asia, also southern West Asia - which can have meats, herbs, vegetables, other stuff in it - but not pasta to my knowledge.  Pretty much like what is described in the Wiki article, from a quick scan of it.  (It looks like the article also does not describe pasta as being an integral part of "pilaf" dishes but it does illustrate a "typical" Turkish pilaf dish with one that has orzo.)

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Hello- The Sephardic recipe looked interesting. I thought it was a bit ironic that there was an ad for a well-known brand of sausage on the same page as the recipe.

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"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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"Pilaf (also known as polo, pollo, pilav, pilau, plov, pulao, polu and palaw) is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth" - Wikipedia.

 

Clearly all these words are cognate (Indo-European? or perhaps even more common beyond that language family), but I don't know if the above characterization is strictly correct…

 

When I hear "pilaf" I think of rice cooked with pasta (or perhaps barley), a Mediterranean dish, as described above. 

 

Whereas when I hear "pilau" I think of a seasoned rice from a region of India, Pakistan or perhaps Bangladesh.

 

And "plov" means rice cooked with lamb, something more akin to a biryani, but from Central Asia - Uzbekistan primarily when I've had it in New York restaurants.

 

Finally...

 

The key to all this may be that "polo" I believe is just Farsi for "rice."

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When I hear "pilaf" I think of rice cooked with pasta (or perhaps barley), a Mediterranean dish, as described above. 

 

Whereas when I hear "pilau" I think of a seasoned rice from a region of India, Pakistan or perhaps Bangladesh.

 

 

Whereas your "pilau" is my "pilaf" so when I think of "pilaf" it is a rice dish (no pasta) in particular from the Indian sub-continent.  Biryani is just a form of pilaf, so far as I am concerned.  No pasta.

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"Pilaf (also known as polo, pollo, pilav, pilau, plov, pulao, polu and palaw) is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth" - Wikipedia.

 

Clearly all these words are cognate (Indo-European? or perhaps even more common beyond that language family), but I don't know if the above characterization is strictly correct…

 

When I hear "pilaf" I think of rice cooked with pasta (or perhaps barley), a Mediterranean dish, as described above. 

 

Whereas when I hear "pilau" I think of a seasoned rice from a region of India, Pakistan or perhaps Bangladesh.

 

And "plov" means rice cooked with lamb, something more akin to a biryani, but from Central Asia - Uzbekistan primarily when I've had it in New York restaurants.

 

Finally...

 

The key to all this may be that "polo" I believe is just Farsi for "rice."

 

Not to get too off-topic but the various words all derive from Persian polow, which does not mean rice generically (that would be berenj*), but rather "rice cooked with stuff," such as zereshk polow, albaloo polo, etc (rice with barberries and sour cherries, respectively). The variations are nearly endless, but to my knowledge, broth is NOT involved. The Turkic and Indic worlds were HEAVILY influenced both linguistically and culturally (including culinarily) from Persia and polo-pilav-pilau-plov is just one tiny example. In non-Iranian cultures it seems that the word came to mean something more specific, but in the Iranian world it's a pretty generic term.

 

 

 

*Plain cooked rice in Persian is chelow or kateh, but if I recall right, you cook a lot of Iranian food so I'm guessing you knew that.

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I buy a rice mix at the Arabic store with rice and tiny noddles in it. I check for the name when I get there tomorrow.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Not to get too off-topic but the various words all derive from Persian polow, which does not mean rice generically (that would be berenj*), but rather "rice cooked with stuff," such as zereshk polow, albaloo polo, etc (rice with barberries and sour cherries, respectively). The variations are nearly endless, but to my knowledge, broth is NOT involved. The Turkic and Indic worlds were HEAVILY influenced both linguistically and culturally (including culinarily) from Persia and polo-pilav-pilau-plov is just one tiny example. In non-Iranian cultures it seems that the word came to mean something more specific, but in the Iranian world it's a pretty generic term.

 

 

 

*Plain cooked rice in Persian is chelow or kateh, but if I recall right, you cook a lot of Iranian food so I'm guessing you knew that.

So... a person who loves to mix rice  with stuff is a polow-player!

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"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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