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Anna N

The Savory Baking Topic

138 posts in this topic

Linda,

That looks great. It is next up on my list of things to try. I read a review of the recipe on the blog Of Cabbages and Kings and knew I would have to try it. I'm so glad you liked it and reported on it.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Linda,

That looks great. It is next up on my list of things to try. I read a review of the recipe on the blog Of Cabbages and Kings and knew I would have to try it. I'm so glad you liked it and reported on it.

 

 

I'll check out the blog, thanks for pointing it out.

 

http://gaaarp.wordpress.com/2011/01/09/corn-pudding-tart-modbak/

 

edited to add link (I think this is the one you referenced, Anna)


Edited by LindaK (log)


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image.jpg

image.jpg

At last the corn pudding tart from Modern Baking. Linda's decision to leave out the butter seemed wise so I followed suit. The recipe came together very easily however I ended up with enough filling for at least one more tart. Perhaps my ears of corn were larger or juicier. Perhaps my scallions were fatter. Perhaps my tart pan is smaller. Another case where weights would have been valuable. But it is a lovely and different savory tart. I would up the seasoning and the heat next time.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I think I'm gonna have to try that corn tart... but I'm not leaving out the butter. Calories be damned, butter and corn is flavor combo perfection. :biggrin:

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I think I'm gonna have to try that corn tart... but I'm not leaving out the butter. Calories be damned, butter and corn is flavor combo perfection. :biggrin:

Even without the butter I had to put it out of sight! It was not the calories that frightened me but the amount of filling I already had. To me it straddled the divide between sweet and savoury. It needed to be seasoned more aggressively and to have added heat to drag it back from the brink.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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How about meat pies and pastries?

 

Steak & kidney pies, cold pork pies, French charcuterie with pastry tops?

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How about meat pies and pastries?

 

Steak & kidney pies, cold pork pies, French charcuterie with pastry tops?

We're waiting, Patrick!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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One of my favorites from many years ago is Cornish Pasties or Upper Michigan Pasties.  Harder to find ready-made these days.

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Anna I'd love to contribute but I have zero expertise in the area - all I know is I love that stuff!

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Swiss chard and artichoke pie, loosely based on a recipe from Marcella Hazan in Marcella Cucina.

 

DSCF1612.JPG

 

 

The vegetables are bound by a mixture of ricotta, parmesan, and egg, with onions and herbs adding extra flavor.  The crust is made with olive oil rather than butter.

 

Very, very good.

 

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Anna I'd love to contribute but I have zero expertise in the area - all I know is I love that stuff!

Paul,

I just started. Spent my life convinced I couldn't bake. Food processors, stand mixers and excellent videos have shown me otherwise. Dive in. The water's lovely.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Linda,

Your swiss chard and artichoke pie looks amazing! What did you bake it in? It has such height.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Linda,

Your swiss chard and artichoke pie looks amazing! What did you bake it in? It has such height.

 

It was baked in a springform pan.  Mine has 2.5" sides so you can get that height, which I like.

 

The only tricky part was the olive oil dough.  It's a lot softer than dough made with cold butter, especially with the egg addition. I chilled it for maybe 90 minutes before I rolled it out (this recipe was a last minute dinner decision, not a carefully thought out plan. It was getting late and I was hungry!)  It was still somewhat soft, so when I lined the springform, the dough wanted to collapse and couldn't be neatly pressed against the sides. Solved by draping it over the edges and quickly adding the filling.  Next time I will let it chill longer.

 

The leftovers made a great picnic lunch today. A swiss chard skeptic was converted.

 

 

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Love to have your adapted recipe for that swiss chard artichoke pie. Just curious: if I am cooking for gluten free person can the filling be baked without a crust? Will it hold together and be sliceable or is the crust necessary to keep it from slumping?

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It was baked in a springform pan.  Mine has 2.5" sides so you can get that height, which I like.

 

The only tricky part was the olive oil dough.  It's a lot softer than dough made with cold butter, especially with the egg addition. I chilled it for maybe 90 minutes before I rolled it out (this recipe was a last minute dinner decision, not a carefully thought out plan. It was getting late and I was hungry!)  It was still somewhat soft, so when I lined the springform, the dough wanted to collapse and couldn't be neatly pressed against the sides. Solved by draping it over the edges and quickly adding the filling.  Next time I will let it chill longer.

 

The leftovers made a great picnic lunch today. A swiss chard skeptic was converted.

Thank you.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Paul,

I just started. Spent my life convinced I couldn't bake. Food processors, stand mixers and excellent videos have shown me otherwise. Dive in. The water's lovely.

Patrick,

No idea what compelled me to change your name! I do apologize. Currently searching for a Cornish pasty recipe that I'm prepared to attempt.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna, when you find a good pasty recipe, please share it. It's almost the season when we can find fresh rutabagas here!

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Love to have your adapted recipe for that swiss chard artichoke pie. Just curious: if I am cooking for gluten free person can the filling be baked without a crust? Will it hold together and be sliceable or is the crust necessary to keep it from slumping?

 

Ingredient list for filling:

 

1 lemon

4 globe artichokes

1/4 cup evoo for frying onion and artichoke slices

3 Tbsp chopped onion

1 lb swiss chard,  large stems removed, cooked in salted water for a few minutes

1/2 lb ricotta

1 cup fresh grated parmesan cheese

2 eggs

salt, pepper

 

The changes I made to the recipe were:

 

I used frozen artichoke hearts, not fresh, so didn't need the lemon.  I did slice them and fry them til golden (patted very dry first) but I'm sure they weren't as good as using fresh. Next time I will plan ahead and buy fresh.

I cut back on the cheeses, just my preference.

I increased the onion, using a whole small onion, chopped

Marcella uses a yeast dough (still with olive oil), I used an egg/baking powder olive oil dough to save time, no rise required.  I liked it a lot.

 

As I made it, the filling wouldn't quite hold together without a crust.  If you used all the cheese called for and added an additional egg, I bet it would. 

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Patrick,

No idea what compelled me to change your name! I do apologize. Currently searching for a Cornish pasty recipe that I'm prepared to attempt.

There is a link to a recipe on the left of the Cornish Pasty Association web site: http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk

John


Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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There is a link to a recipe on the left of the Cornish Pasty Association web site: http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk

John

How interesting. I have never heard of cake margarine. But since I always trust cows over chemists I'll be using butter. The crust seems to be a cross between pastry and bread. I was not aware of this. Thank you so much for sharing.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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How interesting. I have never heard of cake margarine. But since I always trust cows over chemists I'll be using butter. The crust seems to be a cross between pastry and bread. I was not aware of this. Thank you so much for sharing.

It is a pleasure. We get "cake margarine" in South Africa. It is just a hard margarine designed for baking and is sold in brick form instead of in a tub. It is available in yellow or pure white. I bought a brick of it about four years ago and used some to test in baking a vanilla cake. It has no flavour and thus I never used it again - reverted back to butter.


Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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cheddar, bacon, and scallion scones for breakfast.

 

DSCF1624.JPG

 

 

 

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Well I did not expect this to work at all let alone be good enough to serve as my dinner tonight!

My first attempt at Cornish pasty following the recipe that JohnT linked to.

image.jpg

Not perfect by any means. It sprang a couple of small leaks.

image.jpg

But the filling was moist and tasty. Skirt steak was simply not anywhere to be found so I used thinly sliced chuck. Given that the only liquid comes from the vegetables and the meat I was quite surprised at how moist these were.

image.jpg

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Nice one Anna! Do I recall l that saffron is an ingredient in Cornish pasty? Or is that in another dish from Cornwall?

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Well I did not expect this to work at all let alone be good enough to serve as my dinner tonight!

My first attempt at Cornish pasty following the recipe that JohnT linked to.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Not perfect by any means. It sprang a couple of small leaks.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

But the filling was moist and tasty. Skirt steak was simply not anywhere to be found so I used thinly sliced chuck. Given that the only liquid comes from the vegetables and the meat I was quite surprised at how moist these were.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

How was the dough?

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