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Droo

Haute patisserie cookbook recommendation

10 posts in this topic

I'm wanting a good haute patisserie cookbook that's more than just a recipe book but would be more of a "textbook" for those of us who patisserie is a hobby, but aims to recreate professional level type patisseries etc. I am more interested in the more gateaux type desserts rather than chocolates.

 

Can anyone suggest any books?


Edited by Droo (log)

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I like Bo Friberg's books: The Professional Pastry Chef, and, The Advanced Professional Pastry Chef. You could teach yourself from these books, if you apply yourself diligently. (and buy some equipment)

 

The Cordon Bleu's text: Professional Baking also covers fundamentals well.

 

IMO, the CIA's text, Baking and Pastry, isn't good as a standalone text because it ignores the basics. For example, it is missing recipes for: basic white sandwich bread, plain croissants, biscuits, several basic types of cakes, and several plain custards and sauces. I had to teach from it for a few semesters, and had to give out a lot of supplemental handouts for basic items.

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Alain Ducasse's Grand Livre de Cuisine: Desserts and Pastries.

Francisco Migoya's Elements of Dessert

Bouchon Bakery cookbook

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My 2 cents.  I started here on eG however many years ago and was encouraged to get Herme's Desserts and Chocolate Desserts (or something like) and baked my way through both.  I've tried buying the various text books but found them too dry to work with.  So over the years, whenever there was a chef that excited me I worked my way through their book...and I turned out okay, right?

 

So some of my favorites for lasting usefulness:

Those old Dorie Greenspan Pierre Hermé books are classics for me

Migoya is an amazing teacher - all of his books

Yes, Bouchon but I find that I don't go back to them too often anymore

Reinhardt is still great

Subscribe to So Good - jam packed journal/magazine of haute...if you want haute v. fundamentals

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I'd also add Pierre Herme Pastries, it's a good overview of his style, some simpler pastries, some elaborate gateaux.

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I can't find it--but there was a good thread on this a few months ago. To repeat, I always liked Lenotre (Hermes too) and Roux Brothers. I don't think of the Bouchon Book, which is very pretty, as in the class you are looking for. Agree with Lisa on Friberg--and also the shortcomings of CIA.

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Thanks for the recommendations. The two Friberg books are on my to buy list as well as Elements of Desserts. I suspect I'll use the latter more than the former. My only concern about Migoya's book - is to purely focused on plated desserts? I normally make entremets and layered petit gateaux, I don't tend to do plated desserts as I need to take what I make into work as so I don't end up with clogged arteries and the size of a house.

 

Are the Hermes books (apart from the Dorie ones) in English? I wish pH10 was in English, that book looked awesome.

 

I was recommended So Good as well but what I have seen of it, there isn't the explanation (the why) I'm seeking. As gfron1 suggests, I think I am after a cross between a textbook (which should provide the why) and a cookbook (providing the up to date recipes and techniques). I don't want something that's dry. My local patisserie supply store recommended So Good Recipes and Ramon Morato's Chocolate. He preferred Morato's book over someone like Paco Torreblanca's tome as the former explained a lot - alas both are incredibly pricey. 

 

He also suggested that the next step in my learning is to understand ingredients and how they work. This is so when something does go wrong I understand what has happened and why and what to do/not to do next time. Is this something I'll be able to get from So Good or other sources?

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That's it, what I want is a contemporary haute patisserie cookbook crossed with the book "how baking works". It doesn't exist does it?

 

For example, I recently learned that when adding butter to a ganache, the ganache should be under (off memory) 34 degrees c, i presume to ensure the butterfat doesn't melt. It's little tips like that i love and want more of. I'll have to get my hands on how baking works in the mean time.

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You might find this useful, Felder's approach in the book is of a course rather than a series of disjointed recipes.

Patisserie: Mastering the Fundamentals of French Pastry by Christophe Felder

Available on Amazon it is one of the books you can 'preview' before committing to purchase.

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