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Dinner! 2007


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Made the "Chicken With Sherry Vinegar Sauce" (using all thighs) from A New

Way to Cook. I had asked about that book in the "Cookbooks" forum. That

recipe was recommended by quite a few people. Thanks for that. It was really

wonderful! We also made what the cookbook suggested serving with it, the

Brown Butter Orzo "Risotto". I did not really care for it, but my husband liked it.

I drowned it with the sauce from the chicken which did make it tasty, but I think

that the sauce would make cardboard taste good.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Tonight's dinner was braised oxtails in a cherry and red wine sauce with roasted cauliflower risotto. The risotto was inspired by a previous dinner post. I did my own version roasting the cauliflower and adding bacon with spicy fried bread crumbs on top. It blew the oxtails out of the water!

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For dessert (not pictured) I made a chocolate bread pudding with Cherry Chocolate Bread from Zingerman's and a chocolate custard. Served warm and topped with vanilla ice cream.

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Tonight was spaghetti and meatballs, and I will say, I am thrilled, as I have discovered the secret to perfect meatballs... I used to make my meatballs with dry breadcrumbs, but recently I have switched to using soft bread (white or light whole wheat) that has been crumbled and then soaked in milk. The difference this makes in the texture of the meatballs is amazing -- both times I've done them this way they have turned out phenomenally moist, tender, and flavorful. Actually, one other new development in my meatball making has been the addition of a good handful of parsley... On its own I can't stand parsley, but I am finding that it really makes a big difference in the meatballs...

In an experiment, trying to lighten my very dense meatloaf, I finly chopped a can of (drained) water chestnuts in my mini-processor and added them to the mix. Amazingly nice addition; light, almost fluffy meatloaf with a subtlw crunch factor. Yummy!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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chufi those rolls look really perfect! and thank you also for the crepes/lemon curd pointers!

tonight we had some leftover salmon rillettes with a Gin Daisy (not pictured)

then oysters 2 ways!

1st Kumomotos (sp) on the half shell with mignotte

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then totten virginicas baked up as Oysters Rockefeller

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YUM!

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wow, I can smell the ozone; Wendy what is the difference in taste between the 2 types of oysters you used? Was it a special occasion?? (champagne :smile: )

I believe in champagne, no special occasion nessisary but we are still celebrating the oven! :laugh:

kumomotos are very small and best raw IMHO. they are sweet and slightly briney.

Totten virginicas are quite large but even raw have a clean sweet flavor vs. the musty flavor I sometimes find with larger oysters. these were perfect baked up and their liquor was really tasty!!

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Tonight I attempted a cassoulet for the first time. I used Paula Wolfert's Catalan Style recipe as a base, except I used pork shoulder instead of lamb. I also used smoked pork belly, and some Louisiana sausage. I had some trouble getting the crumbs to brown evenly, but it was pretty darn good nonetheless.

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Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Major compliments to EVERYONE on a ton of awesome looking dinners!

LMF, I'm so jealous of those oysters...kumomotos are my absolute favorite :wub:

I've got a bunch of catching up to do...

Broccoli cheese soup:

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Creamy pasta with bacon and strips of celery root:

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Whole striped bass en papillote, with ginger, garlic, lemon grass, thai basil, serrano chilis, red bell pepper, scallion, soy, lime and bourbon:

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Steamed pork spareribs with black bean and garlic, plated with some brown rice and baby chinese cabbage:

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Marlene, wonderful looking cassoulet

Nishla, the combination of seasonings for the fish sounds amazing -- especially the bourbon!

We put together a simple meal with part of a left-over roasted chicken. Some of that and some blanched asparagus in a sauce of reduced chicken broth, soy sauce, sesame oil, and a little corn starch. All over rice.

The chicken bones are now simmering away with some aromatics for a future meal.

Michael

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Lunch and DINNER for today was Vegetable soup with ham and tendons...

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Served with my homemade pork and shrimp dumplings.

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Look at the porky/shrimpy goodness inside...

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Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Beautiful dinners Nishla and Moby!

Love that burger Klary, it looks wonderfully simple and perfect.

Last night's dinner sous vide sirloin and a nice little salad with some really wonderfully sweet onions.

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Tonight was braised lamb shank on pasta with a parsley salad variation.

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Rocky

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Whole striped bass en papillote, with ginger, garlic, lemon grass, thai basil, serrano chilis, red bell pepper, scallion, soy, lime and bourbon:

gallery_45959_4078_15031.jpg

gallery_45959_4078_16978.jpg

Oh, that sounds really, really good.

Yeah, it does!

I was wondering whether you'd consider that a fusion dish, Nishla.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Whole striped bass en papillote, with ginger, garlic, lemon grass, thai basil, serrano chilis, red bell pepper, scallion, soy, lime and bourbon:

gallery_45959_4078_15031.jpg

gallery_45959_4078_16978.jpg

Oh, that sounds really, really good.

Yeah, it does!

I was wondering whether you'd consider that a fusion dish, Nishla.

Thanks for the compliments! I think a lot of what I cook could be considered "fusion", and this would probably fall right into that category. I usually don't care if something is authentic; it just has to taste good! :biggrin:

By the way, next time I make this, I'll definitely make some slits on the sides of the fish so the flavors get into the flesh...the skin acted to seal the flavors out, and the meat was somewhat bland if eaten on its own.

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I believe in champagne

What sentiment. Do I you mind if I steal that for my signature on another site?

Have at it!!!

Made a gratin the other night with left over easter ham, red chard, gruyere and chicken stock instead of cream- It was very tasty and the perfect thing to make the day ahead and then pop it in the oven as we were having some cocktails with friends.

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Edited by little ms foodie (log)
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I'd love to know the recipe for the Pineapple Caipirihna - I love the Ginger Caipirihna's at Cactus.

Those were technically lime-pineapple caipirinhas, I guess; the pineapple was very sweet and mild, so I wanted a little of the tartness of lime as well.

1/4 lime, cut into small wedges

4-5 chunks of fresh pineapple

1 Tablespoon Demerara sugar

3 ounces cachaça (I happened to use Pirassununga Cachaça 51)

Muddled the limes and sugar in a mixing glass, add pineapple and muddle a very little more (pineapple just turns to a pulp if you muddle it too much). Add crushed ice and cachaça, stir thoroughly. Pour contents into old-fashioned-style glass.

The most traditional caipirinha would leave out the pineapple and have twice the lime.

I've done this with blueberries and strawberries too -- mmmmm!

-Dayne aka TallDrinkOfWater

###

"Let's get down to business. For the gin connoisseur, a Martini garnish varies by his or her mood. Need a little get-up-and-go?---lemon twist. Wednesday night and had a half-tough day at the office?---olive. Found out you're gonna have group sex with Gwen Stefani and Scarlett Johansson at midnight?---pour yourself a pickled onion Gibson Martini at 8:00, sharp." - Lonnie Bruner, DC Drinks

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Tonight we made something resembling Fuchsia Dunlop’s farmhouse stir-fried pork with Poblano and Anaheim chiles. Quick, tasty, and perfect for a busy weeknight. Jasmine rice and cucumbers on the side.

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This looks great. Share...the recipe, that is?

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Octaveman: Thanks! After all of the time that you spend helping people with knife questions, how could I not share the recipe? From Fuchsia Dunlop's Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook (eGullet-friendly link) via feast with bron: farmhouse stir-fried pork with green peppers (click).

If you are looking for a cookbook that is chock-full of recipes for flavor-packed Chinese food, I highly recommend either (or both :smile: ) of Ms. Dunlop's books.

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