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Chocolate Confection Class


rio marie
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Hello.

I finished the Gourmet Chocolate confection class given by Richardson Research labs this past week. It was a week long class and basically we made an assorted box of chocolates. Besides Terry Richardson there were 2 assistants. Thalia from Guittard and Peter who works in Reseach and Developement in the candy industry. They made the centers while us ,the students, did all the tempering by hand and hand dipped all the confections. I took a load of pics but haven't had the chance to load them onto my computer. We made everything from Nougat, Caramel, Toffee, Jellies, Truffles, Nut Clusters, Molded Chocolates, ButterCreams, It was a great class. We were given the recipes to all. There are a few ingredients I may have a problem getting. He used Anhydrous Butter and the corn syrup he used was 42de grade. Have any of you herad of that? I was quite humble doing the hand tempering since I have a Hillards Little Dipper it brought me back to the basics. I had a great time. There were 10 of us.

I'm also known as Renam but decided to use my home computer to post for now on so that why I have a different name.

Unfortunatly he is not offering the class anymore. He does have 2 other classe's he will teach-Chocolate Technology and Confection Technology.

When I get the pic on my computer I will post them...

Rena

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Rena,

Looking forward to more.

In the Chocolate by Ramon Morato thread we have been discussing anhydrous butter and I think have concluded that here we can just use clarified butter.

42DE glucose can likely be purchased from Qzina or just about any other pastry/confectionery supplier.

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Thanks for the info on the de42 corn syrup and butter. Now onto the class. We started everymorning out by making our chocolate to dip by tempering. While I've been spoiled by my tempering machine these past few years it was nice to do it the old fashion way. He has a method that works. I'll try to keep it as simple as I can. It's kinda lengthy.

Place chocolate previously melted to 120-125 in top of a double boiler.

Place 70degree water in bottom of db

Insert top boiler to bottom and cool chocolate from 125 to 95F

Once cooled to 95F (92F milk) change water temp in bottom db to 95-100F to maintain warm chocolate.

Once chocolate goes to 92f (90f mmilk) pour out 20% of chocolate onto formica board or marble slab and mush the chocolate by moving the chocolate back and forth with a scraper taking care not to form hard lumps. Maintain the chocolate in the pot at 92f by stirring it occasionally not letting any lumps form on the side either,

When the mush has taken on a mat appearnce (shine has gone away and consistency is that of frosting) transfer back to the main body of chocolate in the db.

Mix in well scraping the sides of the top db. Do Not incorporate air into the chocolate. If your water goes cold change it. You must be constantly taking the temp and going on appearance as well. Once chocolate goes to 90F (88F milk) take a sample put on a piece of foil and place in front of a fan on Low. Fan should be blowing just over the chocolate not right on it. It should set up within 2 to 3 minutes. When set, check for the snap and the shine. Also check to see that there are no hot streaks. Hot streaks being like oil in water you should be able to see it at the top of the sample. Terry said that means you just need to stir the chocolate more. Once your sample is good to go then you are ready to dip. You must keep the water constantly at 95 to 97f and keep stirring the chocolate and taking the temp.

So that's it on the tempering. I know most of you have melters or know how to do it the old fashion way but I thought maybe there was something here you could use.

His class was very through we used funnels, heat guns, funnel depositors, bars. Everything that the 3 chocolateiers use (Wybauw, Greets, Greweling) and the confections were fantastic. I finally have my recipe for buttercreams. One recipe uses whipping cream for fondant while another uses butter. The caramels recieps came out really good. I've been purchasing my caramel through Sweet Celebration because I couldn't make it on my own. I'll try his reciepes this year heck may as well I paid enough for the class.

He uses invert sugar in most of his recipes and Invertase which is the same thing I think please correct if I"m wrong..

For the 'Rich Creamy Caramel' he uses an ingredient called '25% Disodium Phosphate Duohydrate' which he said gives it a smoother texture. We made 2 batchs of this reciepe one with the disodium and one without. The one without came out firmer and was able to put in the bars and cut and then dipped the next day. It had the same consistency as the Kraft Caramel you buy at the store. We also made Turtles from this recipe too.

As for the Jellie, he did something interesting. We used Black Current Jam by Robertsons ( he adamatly said do not use Smuckers or Knotts Barry Farms brands) and he also used Motts unsweetned applesause for the pectin. We cooked them to 235f and poured into a pan lined with saran wrap sprayed with PAM. We then placed a pecan half set one inch apart then sliced when set. We did the same with orange marmalade using Brand called Dundee which you can buy at Trader Joes.

My favorite is the Strawberry Buttercream. He used freeze dried strawberry in the fondant.

I wish he would have the class again. Maybe if he gets enough people asking he might have it again. This guy knows his stuff. I"m thinking of taking the Confectionary Techonology class. I want to know more!!

That's it for now. If you have a question on a recipe let me know and I'll see if I can help. OH we also used a Refractometer too to check for solids in the Jellies. We also used alot of Liquers....

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Can I second the request for the buttercream ingredients. I am not too happy with the couple I have tried so far.

In answer to your question Rena invertase is the enzyme that you add to fondant so it turns liquid after moulding/dipping. Not the same ingredient as invert sugar.

many thanks

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Although I cannot go far afield for confectionary classes, I am hoping to take some classes from Kerry Beal when we return to Ontario in January.

I too would like the buttercream recipe. Invert sugar is not hard to make and it keeps a very long time.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Here's the recipe for 'Hand Rolled Strawberry Cream' centers:

Place in a 4qt pot:

1.)sugar---2lbs. and 4oz

42DE Corn Syrup, regular---1 & 1/4 oz

water---11 & 1/2 oz

2.) Cook to 237f and add:

Heavy Whipping Cream---8 & 1/2 oz

3.) Cook back to 237f

4.) Pour onto cold table, sprinkle with water and cool to 95F

5.) Start agitating with hand scraper

When batch appears opaque add:

Invertase---3/8 tsp

Strawberry Powder Freeze Dried, Seedless---2 & 1/4 oz

Frappe---5 & 1/4oz

6.) Continue creaming and beat through second stage of plasticity

7.) Roll into bite-size pieces (3/4" patties)

8.) Leave uncoated overnight but wrap loosly with plastic wrap over top.

9.) Dip in milk or Dark Chocolate.

Here's the recipe for 'Hand Rolled Butter Cream'

Place in a 4qt cooking vessel (pot)

Sugar---2lbs and 4oz

42DE Corn Syrup, regular--- 2oz

Water---11 & 1/2 oz

Cook to 242f and wash down side AT BOIL and spatucula too

2.) Pour approximately 1/2" thick layer onto a cold table ( DO NOT SCRAPE OUT PAN) Sprinkle with water over top. Cool quickly to 95f.

3.) Add and start agitating with scarpers

Dairy Butter, salted---7oz

4.) When batch starts to look opaque add:

Invertase--- 1/8 tsp

Vanilla---1/4 tsp

Pecans finely chopped---6oz

5.) Continue agitating until batch replasticizes

6.) Roll cream into small bite size pieces (3/4" balls) and allow to crust over night

then dip in dark chocolate. Creams can be left uncoated overnight, but place saran (loosely) over top of tray.

I haven't tried these yet because I'm finding it diffcult to source the 42de corn syrup. I might just order glucose from Sweet Celebration. He did say do not use the corn syrup you by at the store.

Hope this works for you guys.....

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Thanks Rena.

Where do you live - perhaps I can find a source of the glucose near you?

Thanks Kerry I appreciate that!

I live in the San Francisco Bay Area in a town called Hayward...

I called one place but they haven't called me back yet.

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Thanks Rena.

Where do you live - perhaps I can find a source of the glucose near you?

Thanks Kerry I appreciate that!

I live in the San Francisco Bay Area in a town called Hayward...

I called one place but they haven't called me back yet.

Qzina should have glucose and they are in SF.

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Can someone remind me what frappe is (from the strawberry buttercream recipe)? i have a bunch of cream leftover from miscalculating my weekends production, and thought i might use it for some experimentation...

Marshmallow fluff! There is a good recipe in Ruth Kendrick's Candymaking.

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Can someone remind me what frappe is (from the strawberry buttercream recipe)? i have a bunch of cream leftover from miscalculating my weekends production, and thought i might use it for some experimentation...

Greweling has a recipe for frappe and it doesn't take cream at all: dry albumen, cold water, glucose syrup and invert sugar...and I don't know what it is either. :wacko:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Can someone remind me what frappe is (from the strawberry buttercream recipe)? i have a bunch of cream leftover from miscalculating my weekends production, and thought i might use it for some experimentation...

Marshmallow fluff! There is a good recipe in Ruth Kendrick's Candymaking.

I should mention that in Candymaking the frappe recipe is called "Mazetta".

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  • 2 months later...

I apologize for the tardiness in my posting - I always seem to be on the "back end" of discussions.

I found 42DE Corn Syrup at my local Bakery Supply House in Baltimore Maryland, take a look around your area for Bakery supply and I'm sure they would have it. Of course, I buy in 50 pound pails, which may be excessive for your use.

If I'm not mistaken, Karo Syrup is equivalent to 42DE, but don't take my word on that one until you try it or check it out further.

But wait - there's more. If all else fails, contact Burke Candy - he carries a full line of confection based ingredients, he would be more than happy to help you out, he's an amazing guy and very friendly and very helpful.

Just do a Google search for Burke Candy - you'll find him.

Bless you for the input and output on the class - I've been wanting to attend that one for years...

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I apologize for the tardiness in my posting - I always seem to be on the "back end" of discussions.

I found 42DE Corn Syrup at my local Bakery Supply House in Baltimore Maryland, take a look around your area for Bakery supply and I'm sure they would have it.  Of course, I buy in 50 pound pails, which may be excessive for your use.

If I'm not mistaken, Karo Syrup is equivalent to 42DE, but don't take my word on that one until you try it or check it out further.

But wait - there's more.  If all else fails, contact Burke Candy - he carries a full line of confection based ingredients, he would be more than happy to help you out, he's an amazing guy and very friendly and very helpful.

Just do a Google search for Burke Candy - you'll find him. 

Bless you for the input and output on the class - I've been wanting to attend that one for years...

Wow, with a name like "Burke Candy" he must be THE guy to contact for your confectionary needs! :biggrin:

Thanks for the info, by the way. I see recipes that specify 42DE or 60DE glucose but have trouble finding this info at point of sale.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Actually, his name is Tim Burke - but, I don't think he'd mind of you called him Mr. Candy -

If you're having difficulty finding different hard to find ingredients, give them a call, if they can help you, I'm sure they will, they are really nice and friendly people.

They also sell a powdered cream that you can reconsitute to whatever fat % your formula's require - for years I used fresh cream with good results, but his powdered.... all I can say is Amazing - no expiration date, excellent product results, easy to use -

Tim's the man...

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Actually, his name is Tim Burke - but, I don't think he'd mind of you called him Mr. Candy -

If you're having difficulty finding different hard to find ingredients, give them a call, if they can help you, I'm sure they will, they are really nice and friendly people.

They also sell a powdered cream that you can reconsitute to whatever fat % your formula's require - for years I used fresh cream with good results, but his powdered.... all I can say is Amazing - no expiration date, excellent product results, easy to use -

Tim's the man...

Totally agree. I've dealt with Burke Candy before to buy invertase. They were extremely helpful and got it across the border to me with minimal aggravation.

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<snip>

They also sell a powdered cream that you can reconsitute to whatever fat % your formula's require - for years I used fresh cream with good results, but his powdered.... all I can say is Amazing - no expiration date, excellent product results, easy to use -

Tim's the man...

Really?!? Powdered cream? I have to wonder how that would compare to regular cream. Has anyone else tried it?

Burke Candy ->(here)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Oh my god - you know how hard I looked for powdered cream back when I was doing my experiments with bean to bar chocolate? I wanted to make a 'cream chocolate' rather than a 'milk chocolate'.

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Ooops, my bad. Guess I was thinking about ganaches... though would be fun to play around with some. Would definitely need the powdered for bars.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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