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Oysters


baconburner
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Hi

I am getting a large shipment of oysters which we will enjoy in various fresh forms. This is probably a naive question. What can you do to save them for later use?

Thanks

Malcolm

Store them cup down (rounded side down) in a fridge between 1 and 4 degrees C and place wet newspaper or a damp towel over top of them.

If they are European Flats (Belons), place weight on top of them to keep the top shells closed. They tend to gape.

Edited by Shellfish Sam (log)
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cup down? really mr. shellfish? why?

I've always heard cup up (to keep the juice in)...

If you store them cup up, not only will the oyster liquor run out (think about it for a sec, which would keep the juice in, a rounded bottom or a flat top?) but it is the equivalent to me hanging you by your feet to rest.

Hardly restful and very stressful on what is after all a living creature.

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I have always found it a good sign, in a market that sells oysters, to see that someone has taken the time to place them all cup side down. It is just a subtle indication that they know what they are doing and the odds are better that you will be getting a good product. I knock them together and listen to the sound that each one makes. A solid knock like a beach stone against another is what you want to hear. A hollow sound is the alarm that there is a problem. I arrange mine in a bowl in the crisper of the fridge cup side down and enjoy them for as much as a week. That is the extent of my experience with their preservation. They still must be scrutinized when upened for lack of freshness. A robust quantity of clear liquor and clean aroma is a green light.

HC

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Is it sacrilege to buy them shelled if you can't find them in their shells? (You see them sometimes in these little plastic packages; always wondered...)

We buy the fresh ones in the dreaded plastic package (like a yogurt carton) every Christmas to make oyster stuffing for Signor Turkey. Works a treat and saves a bit on space at a time of year when fridge real estate is at a premium.

Edited by grayelf (log)
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" What can you do to save them for later use?"

What is your time frame?

With your oysters you should get a Harvest Tag showing date of harvest and harvest location. We purchase from Browne Trading and invariably the oysters are harvested the day before shipping and with Overnight shipping the oysters are two days old when they reach us.

I store a layer of oysters, a layer of ice with a drain at the bottom and use within 5 days of reciept. Govern your use by your harvest date. This is a living product out of its element. You can't simply preserve it for an extended period of time.-Dick

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Or you could pickle them as in the The French Laundry Cookbook. But maybe that was the wrong kind of preservation. :smile:

(Actually, I don't even know if that pickling is strong enough to work as a preservation or if it more is a kind of flavouring.)

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