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  1. "Los Secretos del Helado" is in my opinion the best professional book ever written about ice-creams. Originally it was printed only in Spanish language, I searched the forum and in some past threads some users complained about this. But now it's available for free download in English and Italian language: http://www.angelocorvitto.com/ingles/libro/pdf.html This is a mandatory book for all ice-cream makers. Teo
  2. HOST'S NOTE: This post and those that follow were split off from the pre-release discussion of Modernist Bread. ***** Figured I don't need to dump all this into the contest thread - so I'll post here. My journey to making my first MC loaf. Her's the poolish after >12 hours: Not pictured - water with yeast in it below the bread flour and poolish That went into the mixer and not long later I had a shaggy mass: That rested for a while - then mixed until medium gluten formation - a window pane that was both opaque and translucent (no picture for that slightly messy part) Folded and rested, folded and rested, I think this is 1/2 the mass now ready to rest one final time. Proofed it in the oven - I have a picture of that but it's just foggy window oven Then it went into the oven, here it is at max temp - 450 with steam turned on. Completed loaf: \ And the crumb - this is awesome bread:
  3. What ONE cookbook could you not do without? You may have 1,000+ cookbooks, but what is the one volume you keep going back to again and again. For me, it's the Joy of Cooking. There's just something about it that keeps me coming back. I know it's pretty standard, but that's just me. So what about you? What's your one book? (Oh, and if that book changes from time to time, feel free to update)
  4. 165, 124. That's a lotta cookbooks, but I know it's nowhere near the true figure. C'mon, guys. Fess up. [Moderator note: The original Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)]
  5. Over the years I've collected both cookbooks and a large collection of what I call cooking "booklets." These are small booklets that were often mailed or given out free at grocery stores. Most of them measure 5 1/2" x 8 1/2". My Mother had a large collection, and I've bought many of them, for a few cents each, at vintage shops and estate sales. I think my Mother would often clip something out of the newspaper food section or a magazine and send it in to the sponsor for the booklet. Magazines like Sunset and Better Homes and Gardens printed a series of these booklets. They're a historical record of the way we cooked and ate at the time, but I also find them a great resource for creating new recipes today. I'll start by posting the Metropolitan Cook Book printed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Often there wasn't a published date in these cook books, but based on the recipes compared to my collection of vintage cook books, I'd say this one dates to around 1915. Many of the recipes are similar to what I've found in the Fannie Farmer Cookbook of that time. There is a section of recipes titled "Invalid" recipes, where one could have things like Oatmeal Gruel, Irish Moss Lemonade and a Raw Beef Sandwich. Under the "Lunch Box" section, there is a suggested cold lunch for "Industrial Workers"- 1 minced ham sandwich with white bread 1 Swiss cheese sandwich with rye bread 1 whole tomato 1 apple dumpling 1 cup coffee (in Thermos) For "School Children"- 1 cottage cheese sandwich on brown bread 1 jelly sandwich on white bread 1 apple 1/2 pint bottle of milk
  6. Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
  7. I have the kitchen to myself for two whole days and thought I'd try a couple recipes from it. What have you tried besides the chicken? I'm leaning towards the Chard/Onion Panade and the Spicy Squid Stew with Roasted Peppers. But it all looks sooo good that I'm open to other suggestions.
  8. Put a fork in me: I think I'm done. With buying cookbooks. I was perusing the Cookbooks 2012 topic and realized that there was nothing on the list that was getting me excited. A tour of a few websites also left me cold. This is no critique of the current crop of books, mind you. I think I just may have hit my limit. Don't cry for me. It's not like I'm deprived. It's a bit mysterious. I don't really know when it happened. Anyone else have this sort of thing transpire? Anyone have ideas about why?
  9. Just got my copy of the Milk Bar cookbook a couple days ago, seems we egulleteers have been slacking on creating a topic for this new book! I just made up a batch of cereal milk (So rich! So delicious! Can't wait to try it in my coffee in the morning) and the dough for cornflake-chocolate chip-marshmallow cookies is chilling in the fridge(Corn flake crunch being a component for that recipe). I've eaten a bunch of the dough and am enjoying the salty sweet excess that it promises. Also, I'm having a really hard time sitting still and typing this. Time to run across the room! SUGAR RUSH!!!! YEEHAA! Ahem. Lots of interesting techniques and ingredients I've never used before, probably because I very seldom make sweets. The milk powder is an interesting flavor boost and I'm also looking forward to trying some of the recipes with glucose. I've never used it before and it seems like an interesting goo. I picked it up at a Michael's craft store for half the price of Amazon, so if you're looking for glucose you might check craft stores yourself. Anybody else cooking Tosi's creations at home?
  10. I'm becoming more and more interested in cooking with grains. Right now I use chia, millet, buckwheat and quinoa but am interested in trying others. Does anyone know of a comprehensive book that goes into detail about the different grains available and also has some recipes to give me some idea as to how to cook them? Thank you.
  11. Hi all. I hope you are well. I am just into baking bread due to lockdown and need help. Ideally I would like modernist bread but the wife is not quite agreeing to that yet. So I would like some where to start for now until she comes around to the idea. After she has tasted all my amazing breads I make. I would like this to be in metric rather than imperial. Thank you
  12. So, if I were to get only one cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey, which would I get? Sincerely, Dante
  13. Hello everyone, This is my first post, so please tell me if I've made any mistakes. I'd like to learn the ropes as soon as possible. I first learned of this cookbook from The Mala Market, easily the best online source of high-quality Chinese ingredients in the west. In the About Us page, Taylor Holiday (the founder of Mala Market) talks about the cookbooks that inspired her. This piqued my interest and sent me down a long rabbit hole. I'm attempting to categorically share everything I've found about this book so far. Reading it online Early in my search, I found an online preview (Adobe Flash required). It shows you the first 29 pages. I've found people reference an online version you can pay for on the Chinese side of the internet. But to my skills, it's been unattainable. The Title Because this book was never sold in the west, the cover, and thus title, were never translated to English. Because of this, when you search for this book, it'll have several different names. These are just some versions I've found online - typos included. Sichuan (China) Cuisine in Both Chinese and English Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (In English & Chinese) China Sichuan Cuisine (in Chinese and English) Chengdu China: Si Chuan Ke Xue Ji Shu Chu Ban She Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (Chinese and English bilingual) 中国川菜:中英文标准对照版 For the sake of convenience, I'll be referring to the cookbook as Sichuan Cuisine from now on. Versions There are two versions of Sichuan Cuisine. The first came out in 2010 and the second in 2014. In an interview from Flavor & Fortune, a (now defunct) Chinese cooking magazine, the author clarifies the differences. That is all of the information I could find on the differences. Nothing besides that offhanded remark. The 2014 edition seems to be harder to source and, when available, more expensive. Author(s) In the last section, I mentioned an interview with the author. That was somewhat incorrect. There are two authors! Lu Yi (卢一) President of Sichuan Tourism College, Vice Chairman of Sichuan Nutrition Society, Chairman of Sichuan Food Fermentation Society, Chairman of Sichuan Leisure Sports Management Society Du Li (杜莉) Master of Arts, Professor of Sichuan Institute of Tourism, Director of Sichuan Cultural Development Research Center, Sichuan Humanities and Social Sciences Key Research Base, Sichuan Provincial Department of Education, and member of the International Food Culture Research Association of the World Chinese Culinary Federation Along with the principal authors, two famous chefs checked the English translations. Fuchsia Dunlop - of Land of Plenty fame Professor Shirley Cheng - of Hyde Park New York's Culinary Institute of America Fuchsia Dunlop was actually the first (and to my knowledge, only) Western graduate from the school that produced the book. Recipes Here are screenshots of the table of contents. It has some recipes I'm a big fan of. ISBN ISBN 10: 7536469640 ISBN 13: 9787536469648 As far as I can tell, the first and second edition have the same ISBN #'s. I'm no librarian, so if anyone knows more about how ISBN #'s relate to re-releases and editions, feel free to chime in. Publisher Sichuan Science and Technology Press 四川科学技术出版社 Cover Okay... so this book has a lot of covers. The common cover A red cover A white cover A white version of the common cover An ornate and shiny cover There may or may not be a "Box set." At first, I thought this was a difference in book editions, but that doesn't seem to be the case. As far as covers go, I'm at a loss. If anybody has more info, I'm all ears. Buying the book Alright, so I've hunted down many sites that used to sell it and a few who still have it in stock. Most of them are priced exorbitantly. AbeBooks.com ($160 + $15 shipping) Ebay.com - used ($140 + $4 shipping) PurpleCulture.net ($50 + $22 shipping) Amazon.com ($300 + $5 shipping + $19 tax) A few other sites in Chinese I bought a copy off of PurpleCuture.net on April 14th. When I purchased Sichuan Cuisine, it said there was only one copy left. That seems to be a lie to create false urgency for the buyer. My order never updated past processing, but after emailing them, I was given a tracking code. It has since landed in America and is in customs. I'll try to update this thread when (if) it is delivered. Closing thoughts This book is probably not worth all the effort that I've put into finding it. But what is worth effort, is preserving knowledge. It turns my gut to think that this book will never be accessible to chefs that have a passion for learning real Sichuan food. As we get inundated with awful recipes from Simple and quick blogs, it becomes vital to keep these authentic sources available. As the internet chugs along, more and more recipes like these will be lost. You'd expect the internet to keep information alive, but in many ways, it does the opposite. In societies search for quick and easy recipes, a type of evolutionary pressure is forming. It's a pressure that mutates recipes to simpler and simpler versions of themselves. They warp and change under consumer pressure till they're a bastardized copy of the original that anyone can cook in 15 minutes. The worse part is that these new, worse recipes wear the same name as the original recipe. Before long, it becomes harder to find the original recipe than the new one. In this sense, the internet hides information.
  14. Congratulations are due to Fuchsia Dunlop, whose "Food of Sichuan" has just been published in a Chinese language version - a rare honour here. I've ordered a couple of copies as gifts for local friends who loved the Engish version, but struggled with some language issues. 《川菜》, 中信出版社。
  15. I've ranted many a time on egullet about my frustration with American cookbooks (baking in particular) and the fact that most still tend to utilize volume measurements rather than weight, be it avoirdupois or metric. Hey: we all spend thousands on our computers -- why not shell out a few bucks for a scale and have our baked goods actually turn out as they were meant to? Why not, when writing a cookbook, offer the option of volume AND ounces AND grams? So. I decided to bake the gorgeous looking caramel cake in this month's SAVEUR. Baked the buttery layers last night and they look gorgeous. It wasn't until I was prepping to make the icing this morning that I re-read the recipe and saw that the first ingredient did NOT read "16 ounces unsalted butter" as I thought, but "16 tbsp unsalted butter". Tablespoons? Why would anyone measure out 16 "tablespoons"? Why not "8 ounces" or "224 grams" or "1 cup" or even "2 cubes" of butter???? Why would a magazine the calibre of SAVEUR print a recipe that way? Truth be told, it is my fault for not reading it correctly. But when I see a "16" in a recipe, it usually refers to ounces, not tablespoons. Bakers beware! And then the icing. The caramel icing cooks a long, long time. I had it on the lowest flame possible. And it burned. The recipe made it all sound so simple with no warning of possible burning during the one and a half hour cooking period. Granted, I've made caramel before. I know the ease with which sugar can burn. But what about all the non-bakers who decide to make this cake and icing and after an hour or so of stirring "occasionally", they end up with bits of gritty black in their smooth caramel icing? So I am starting a petition for better and more accurate recipe writing, and especially getting the US in step with the rest of the world in jumping on the metric bandwagon. But first, I have to go to the store in order to pick up some more evaporated milk so that I can spend another hour and a half making the damn caramel icing in order to frost my very, very, very buttery cake.
  16. i am in the process of minimizing and have some cookbooks that i can no longer use. if anyone would like them, please pm me with your snail mail address and i will drop them in the box. right now i have 4 available: Lancaster County Cookbook My Own Cook Book - Gladys Taber Peter Hunt's Cape Cod Cookbook The Luchow's Cookbook I would rather send them to a good home with one of you than drop them in the local library book sale.
  17. While not a new cookbook by any means, I haven't really had time to dig into this one until now. We've previously discussed the recipes in Jerusalem: A Cookbook, but not much has been said about Plenty. So, here goes... Chickpea saute with Greek yogurt (p. 211) This was a great way to kick off my time with this book. The flavors were outstanding, particularly the use of the caraway seeds and lemon juice. I used freshly-cooked Rancho Gordo chickpeas, which of course helps! The recipe was not totally trivial, but considering the flavors developed, if you don't count the time to cook the chickpeas it came together very quickly. I highly recommend this dish.
  18. "You cannot run away from weakness; you must some time fight it out or perish; and if that be so, why not now, and where you stand?" Maybe a bit dramatic, but I've been thinking critically, lately, about my development as a cook. I'll note here an amateur, though enthusiastic, cook. I've come to the conclusion that my weakness now is a lack of creativity with respect to vegetables, both as sides and mains. And sides generally. I've become so immersed in cooking the perfect, moist, flavourful chicken breast; mastering a med-rare rib eye, or cedar smoking a fillet of salmon so it's flakey but not overcooked; etc.--not to mention my latest experiments with cooking sous vide--that vegetables/sides have become kind of an afterthought. Carelessly steamed or sautéed and tossed on the plate next to the "true prize". I know there's lots to learn. Any recommendations for books/resources that might help me both with ideas and technique for improving this area? Thanks!
  19. There doesn't seem to be anything in the threads about spice cookbooks. I just bought The Book of Spices by Frederic Rosengarten, Jr. Copyright 1969. (He has a nut book, too, different thread.) Fabulous illustrations. I also have McCormick's Spices of the World Cookbook and The Spice Cookbook by Avanelle Day and Lillie Stuckey. Anyone have opinions or recommendations?
  20. This is a general question to the readers to think and discuss why there aren't many Indian chefs pursuing the field of food writing whereas international chefs are releasing best sellers almost every year. Also if any change can be brought about by understanding the factors which are acting as barriers and obstacles for Indian chefs to pursue food writing alongside their primary careers. when we think of Indian chefs who have released books, there may be many, but only few come to mind, such as, Sanjeev Kapoor, Vikas Khanna, Madhur Jaffery etc. Again what I wish to know is that why is the awareness level low in India as far as our own chefs are concerned? with such advancements happening in this field, why is it that many chefs find food writing a challenge?
  21. I thought I'd learn some more precision and improve my method of cooking vegetables, so I recently got this book. The recipes aren't complicated. Following the recipes is the tricky thing; I'm a throw-in-a-bit-of-this-and-a-bit-of-that-and-see-what-happens kind of cook. I'll write what I think of the book when I've tried a few more of the recipes. For now, here's the first one I made: Pommes rôties au laurier - roast potatoes with bay The first step in this recipe is to slit the potatoes (I used Exquisas) and slip some slivers of bay inside the incisions. Then you roast them in a mixture of stock and olive oil. Here they are ready to go in the oven: The unusual thing about these roast potatoes is that they're half-way submerged in liquid at the start of cooking. The plan is for the stock to boil off and the potatoes then to roast in the oil; you don't parboil the potatoes first. It's really more of a braise. After 40mins in the heat: The potatoes are very tender after 40mins bubbling away in their bath. They taste - and you'll hardly credit it - of bay, so can make friends with any dish that likes bay. The flavour is pronounced, but perhaps not as much as you would expect with that many leaves getting involved. They are also attractive to look at. On the other hand I had to pour the stock off for the final part of cooking as it didn't evaporate as intended. I will try the recipe again with larger potatoes and a shallower dish - the size and shape of the vessel and the vegetables are left to the imagination by the recipe. That meant pouring off the oil too, which probably affected the texture at the end. There was also a bizarrely large quantity of oil specified so I only used about a fifth of it. The potatoes taste rather one-dimensional; I would perhaps prefer them with some garlic slices stuffed inside as well. We ate them with a green salad and flageolet beans, with a French Domaine Vocoret Chablis in the glass.
  22. Greetings and Salutations Everyone, Having fun going through the forums. Very appreciative of the high level of discourse and good humor. I’m home. Looking for a pasta cook book. One that doesn’t use volumetric measurements. Metric is welcomed. I’ve been making linguine and ravioli for over ten years. Favorite is my KitchenAid Paste roller. Thanks in Advance, Nelson87, In Southern Connecticut
  23. I know I'm way late to the party, but does anyone have a copy of Los Postres De El Bulli that they would be willing to sell or knowledge of where to find one? Thanks!
  24. Dear all, Have already checked some topics about cake books from the index, but would like to start another one. I am looking for the recipe cake books which has the recipes of absolutely delicious layered cakes. You know, not just a cake + buttercream, but perhaps something more interesting, when flavor combination just leaves you with WOW! And of course the compliments from others.. Preferably not too complicated, the one which is possible to make for the intermediate baker at home. Any suggestions?
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