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Dora S

Cutting Boards

249 posts in this topic

I'm looking at getting a new wooden cutting board, preferably a large one that can fit over the sink. Does the type of wood matter, and what makes a good board? The ones that I have seen cost approximately $40 - $70.

Advice appreciated!

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Maple is traditional as it's hard and flavorless. It's not terribly dimensionally stable, though, so expect to see splits in the gluelines after a few years of use. Try and get an end-grain model for true chopping-block effect.


This whole love/hate thing would be a lot easier if it was just hate.

Bring me your finest food, stuffed with your second finest!

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May want to think about one that is made of some other material too, for cutting meat.

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I have all plastic boards - BUT what about these new bamboo boards I keep seeing...anybody know anything about them - how they last - do they sanitize well, dishwasher any news would be great...

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Rubber, rubber, rubber. I've been trying to get the word out that these are the best things you can get for your kitchen. They're indestructible, can go in the dishwasher, can be sanded down, can be put back in shape if they warp, and are knife friendly. They're heavy, but that's a small price to pay.


Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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I would look into Epicurean boards, or other derivative wood fiber composite laminate.

They work about as well as wood (won't mess up your knives, etc.) but without the maintenance and precautions: I don't believe you need to regularly apply oil, plus they're safe to throw in the dishwasher, so you can feel freer to use them with meat and veggies (though some say that even a hot cycle won't kill enough bacteria).

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Rubber, rubber, rubber.  I've been trying to get the word out that these are the best things you can get for your kitchen.  They're indestructible, can go in the dishwasher, can be sanded down, can be put back in shape if they warp, and are knife friendly.  They're heavy, but that's a small price to pay.

Rubber, to me, seems an unstable choice--do you have an example you can point me to? It seems to me that if you're thinly slicing onions on a less-than-stable surface, it wouldn't be difficult to knick off your thumb.

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I would look into Epicurean boards, or other derivative wood fiber composite laminate. 

They work about as well as wood (won't mess up your knives, etc.) but without the maintenance and precautions: I don't believe you need to regularly apply oil, plus they're safe to throw in the dishwasher, so you can feel freer to use them with meat and veggies (though some say that even a hot cycle won't kill enough bacteria).

I have never come across such boards, would you have a link to a picture of one? I don't use a dishwasher, so I would be washing it the old-fashioned way anyway :biggrin:

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Rubber, rubber, rubber.  I've been trying to get the word out that these are the best things you can get for your kitchen.  They're indestructible, can go in the dishwasher, can be sanded down, can be put back in shape if they warp, and are knife friendly.  They're heavy, but that's a small price to pay.

Rubber, to me, seems an unstable choice--do you have an example you can point me to? It seems to me that if you're thinly slicing onions on a less-than-stable surface, it wouldn't be difficult to knick off your thumb.

The rubber boards Varmint is referring to are heavy duty models from SaniTuff. They don't slide around at all. My 15x20x3/4 sample weights about 12 pounds. It's not going anywhere.

Chad


Chad Ward

An Edge in the Kitchen

William Morrow Cookbooks

www.chadwrites.com

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I would look into Epicurean boards, or other derivative wood fiber composite laminate. 

They work about as well as wood (won't mess up your knives, etc.) but without the maintenance and precautions: I don't believe you need to regularly apply oil, plus they're safe to throw in the dishwasher, so you can feel freer to use them with meat and veggies (though some say that even a hot cycle won't kill enough bacteria).

I have never come across such boards, would you have a link to a picture of one? I don't use a dishwasher, so I would be washing it the old-fashioned way anyway :biggrin:

The Epicurean boards aren't bad. I use one as my travel board. But they have two faults: they slip and slide all over the counter unless you put a damp towel underneath, and they are harder that non-composite boards so they will roll your knife edges a little more readily than a softer board. This is not really a problem if you use a steel regularly.

This is the one I have.

Chad

edited to add link.


Edited by Chad (log)

Chad Ward

An Edge in the Kitchen

William Morrow Cookbooks

www.chadwrites.com

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I've used the Sani-Tuff cutting boards and they are quite heavy. However, you can get 1/2" boards, which cuts down on the weight a bit. They seem to be a good cutting board, better than the colored poly/plastic boards, which can get pretty cut up (and hide bacteria) after a while.

As for bamboo, I have a small bamboo cheese board at home that was given to me as a gift. They are laminate boards, so don't try to put them through the dishwasher. I haven't done a lot of cutting on it, but it does seem very durable.

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The boards made by Totally Bamboo are good boards. Harder than Maple boards but not so hard as to damage your knives. There are brands out there that do not used food safe glue so if Bamboo is your final choice, then I'd stick with Totally Bamboo. Plenty of sizes and styles. Go to their website and check out what they have.

As far as wood goes, I have a Boos maple board that is great. If you want the board to last (without warping), then get at least 3/4" thick.

White poly boards are fine and can go into the dishwasher. The Sani-tuff boards are unknown to me from a usage standpoint. I've been very curious about them and just may get one some day but since I love my Boos board, it won't be happening real soon. But I've heard good things about them. Your knife may tend to get stuck in it more though from what I've heard.

If you go with a wood board of some type, definately get end grain if you can afford it. Much better on your knives and for sanitation purposes.


Edited by Octaveman (log)

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Click here to see my previous comments on Sani-Tuff boards -- it's got my vote, and I'm sticking to it.

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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I have a couple of bamboo boards, very attractive, and c ost effective, but I use them with care. The grain is all one way, so I have to chop against it. There is a lot of synthetic glue used in the lamination, and this may leech out over a few years.

The most cost effective board I have comes from Roscan (Quebec) made of end pieces of maple, for about $40 appearing each spring at Costco. I have two, and I'll go back for another.

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Maple is traditional as it's hard and flavorless.  It's not terribly dimensionally stable, though, so expect to see splits in the gluelines after a few years of use.  Try and get an end-grain model for true chopping-block effect.

I've had my Boos block for only a couple months now and am already starting to see some splits and fissures. Anyone know how to prevent these? Am I not applying enough mineral oil?

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I bought my GF a large bamboo board at T.J. Maxx for around $10 and she is really fond of it.


Edited by menon1971 (log)

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The rubber boards Varmint is referring to are heavy duty models from SaniTuff. They don't slide around at all. My 15x20x3/4 sample weights about 12 pounds. It's not going anywhere.

So are they good for home use too?

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Good. I want my mom to get one separate from her wood cutting board for meat. This would be ideal for her needs. She may bawk at the price but you know, you get what you pay for. If she buys a cheap one then she will do nothing but continuously replace it and that is throwing money away. My feeling is always, by something like that once for your kitchen, like your knives, pots and pans etc. because it is an investment in your kitchen.

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She may bawk at the price but you know, you get what you pay for.

I don't think the price is really that bad. A lot cheaper than my wood board. And given how long they last, it's a very good investment. Joes had his for coming up to 8 years now. That would make your (Mom's) 15x20 board cost $1.75/month!!! No brainer to me.


My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Damn skippy. It was a bit of a hit at the time (I think I paid 45 or 50 bucks for it, and cash was tight back then), but when I think of all the cutting boards I have not had to buy over the years...


So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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I would look into Epicurean boards, or other derivative wood fiber composite laminate. 

They work about as well as wood (won't mess up your knives, etc.) but without the maintenance and precautions: I don't believe you need to regularly apply oil, plus they're safe to throw in the dishwasher, so you can feel freer to use them with meat and veggies (though some say that even a hot cycle won't kill enough bacteria).

I have an Epicurean board and everytime I wash it I think to myself, I love my cutting board.

I used to have 4 different cutting boards but I got rid of all of them because I can use this board for everything as long as it's washed inbetween.

I only problem I have is that it does slip around on the counter so I rest it on a bar towel to keep it in place.

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