Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cutting Boards


CRUZMISL
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have bamboo cutting boards and I really like them. I don't know why, but they seem cleaner to me than the old plastic-y ones, even though I ran them through the dishwasher. No matter what I've been cutting, after a wash in hot, soapy water and left to dry (it only takes a minute - I also wonder how they dry so quickly) they always have this clean bamboo scent.

No idea how they measure up in scientific evaluations of sanitation, but aesthetically they feel very clean to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How is the hardness on the bamboo cutting boards?

I saw a peel away cutting board in the new Korin catalog. Seems like a pretty cool idea - when your surface gets too scarred up, you just peel it away to a fresh layer. Pretty expensive though (as is everything in the Korin catalog :smile: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harder is not necessarily better when it comes to a cutting board. Quite the opposite, in fact. A hard cutting surface will quickly dull the edge of a knife that is used on it. This is one reason you always want end grain and never cross-grain cutting boards. Given what they're charging for bamboo cutting boards (50 bucks minimum for a 12-inch square), I don't see why anyone would want one. You can get a nice end grain cutting board from Ikea for around $20.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harder is not necessarily better when it comes to a cutting board.  Quite the opposite, in fact.  A hard cutting surface will quickly dull the edge of a knife that is used on it.  This is one reason you always want end grain and never cross-grain cutting boards.  Given what they're charging for bamboo cutting boards (50 bucks minimum for a 12-inch square), I don't see why anyone would want one.  You can get a nice end grain cutting board from Ikea for around $20.

I love the look and feel of the bamboo boards, which is why I got one. But I agree that it's not a good cutting surface. However, I don't use it for cutting; I use it for serving cheese.

I bought one of the new Epicurean boards, mostly because I got a good deal on it and the small one was the exact size I was looking for. It's fine -- lower maintenance than wood, doesn't seem to stain. It could go in the dishwasher if I had one. The chief drawback is that it slides all over the place -- worse than anything else I have.

I've actually found that of all my cutting boards, the one I prefer is the poly board with the rubber back, precisely because it stays put, without having to put a damp cloth on the counter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They sell little square pads made out of the same stuff you put under rugs to stop them slipping around that are perfect for cutting boards. Or you could just buy one designed for rugs and cut it into the right shape for your board. You can also find them in hardware stores designed for putting wood pieces on when you are routing/sanding them so you don't have to use clamps.

Anyone know what they are called?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used the thin clear plastic sheets more and more. Pkg of 3 of them at bed bath and beyond or somesuch was about $10, I think. There's slightly hacked up after a year, but that's because i've used a serrated knife on them and wasn't careful. Could use separate ones for meat, veggies, etc. but I don't; good old warm soapy water does fine.

But we're re-doing our kitchen and I think I'd like to find a big, nice, stay-on-the-counter board.

Chip Wilmot

Lack of wit can be a virtue

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gee, thanks for making a newbie feel like an idiot.  :unsure:

It has to do with the way the grain lines up. Standing on end the surface tends to be self healing. That's how Bristle Dart boards are made. Don't try to make one I did and I've been doing this for 30 years. Look for small pieces put together they have less movement.

Don't fell bad, come and have fun here We all started somewhere. :biggrin::biggrin:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently bought a Richlite board precisely because it was lightweight. It does resist cutting and staining pretty well, but it also does not stay put very well, as previously noted. My main board is a large Sani-Tuff (hard rubber) which weighs a ton and does stay put, but I don't like to haul it out just to slice up a piece of fruit. Since the Richlite is harder than the rubber board, I don't use it when I have a lot of chopping to do. No matter what they say, I'm sure it's dulling my knives faster.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They sell little square pads made out of the same stuff you put under rugs to stop them slipping around that are perfect for cutting boards. Or you could just buy one designed for rugs and cut it into the right shape for your board. You can also find them in hardware stores designed for putting wood pieces on when you are routing/sanding them so you don't have to use clamps.

Anyone know what they are called?

Non-slip pads? :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got a bamboo board for 'free' with a semi-large knife order. It's 14 inches square, thick, heavy, perfectly finished (oiled), and just plain gorgeous side grain.

I haven't tried cutting anything on it, and after reading the thread, I guess I won't - maybe it's decorative value is more than it's functional value.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gee, thanks for making a newbie feel like an idiot.  :unsure:

Welcome Jujubee. And be sure that's not what was intended. Like others who know lots, Sam is very generous with his extensive knowledge. Check out his ecGI lesson on stovetop cookware. While you're at it, be sure to check out all of the ecGI classes if you haven't yet.

Stovetop cookware class

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

First question. When you get a wooden cutting board, aren't you supposed to season it with (edible) mineral oil?

Second question. When you season it, how many applications should it take?

I finally got one of the Ikea end grain cutting boards (my local store was out of them for months). I applied some mineral oil to it, and it just sucks it up. I've done it 2, 3 times now, and it keeps absorbing it. Method of application: I pour a little pool on, mush it around with my hand and it disappears, so it's not like its caught on a rag or sponge.

I have a thin Dansk endgrain carvinbg board which seems to be finished that I use only for serving and haven't seasoned, but this one from Ikea looked and felt dry. Wonder what sort of wood it is.

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also have an IKEA board… I think the same one you have although the last time I looked for the board I have they didn’t have any.

Anyway, the thing sucks up quite a bit of oil at first. I used to just pour it on and it would barely even pool up as it would absorb so quickly. Eventually the oil absorption dropped significantly. I have had the board for about 3 or so years now and all it needs these days is a light application. I just pour a bit on my hand and rub it on the board. The oil pools at first and takes several minutes before being absorbed. I think that means it’s pretty saturated and properly seasoned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mottmott: Does the board change color and stay that way? Or does it go back to its dry color? I will make no excuses for Ikea, I have one and I also have the family heirloom board, plus the necessary plastic ones that I use all the time... I don't treat my 50 year old board with half as much care as my ikea board... :blush: I rub the cheapo liberally with edible mineral oil about as often as I oil the furniture... It does the trick. It's still in good condition after many months... Many years from now, I just don't know... but the board hasn't suffered much so far with a moderate treatment with the oil. It could take more, it has to be put on rather heavily due to it absorbing fast, like you said. It's true, it never takes on a "sheen" of any kind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one of those Ikea boards. When I first got it over the course of several days I probably went through a whole bottle of mineral oil trying to "season" it. Eventually I realized that the oil was just coming out the other side of the cutting board. I think you should stop when the entire board looks a few shades darker than when you bought it. I've had the board for years and I haven't seasoned it again. It's not cracking or anything so I'm guessing it's fine. But then again those boards are so cheap that I would be too concerned if something happned to mine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the Ikea boards are not made of maple and that accounts for the difference in oil absorption characteristics. I agree that it's properly seasoned when it finally begins allowing the oil to pool up for a few minutes after being applied. That said... I like my old maple board much better than the Ikea board that I owned for awhile and dispensed of in a garage sale. My maple board was actually once the top of a portable dishwasher that broke and was put to the curb by my neighbors. It's so well seasoned that I only oil it a few times each year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...