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Mexico City Dining


Blue Heron
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Please see my previous contributions, as I (and other members) have talked about street food, markets, etc.

A redisvoery, not previously mentioned by anybody, is the old Restaurante Lincoln on calle Revillagigedo #24, about 2 blocks south of the Alemeda. It had been there since the 1940's; I hadn't been for probebly 15 years, but we decided to have comeda there for old times sake and were very pleased with the basically mexican seafood oriented menu. This is an "old time" businessman type place with boothes and funky '50's murals- nothing "hip", bowl of raw vegetables and salsa served when you sit down, a style that is dissapearing here. I had a fabulous "calamares rellenos" and an excellent traditional ceviche. Add it to the list!

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Welcome besos-foods. Your business looks fascinating. If you're interested in fresh foods, you are going to love lots of the places you can visit in Mexico City.  It's a great place for the food explorer.  Perhaps the way to get off to a flying start is to google this forum.  Lots of people have posted reports of their experiences in Mexico City.  That might give you some ideas about places you want to ask more about.  And then we can try to fill you in,

Rachel

thank you Rachel,

I did a search but didn't do a Google search until now. How will I fit all these great places into a weekend? I also saw a write up about a great taco place in Gourmet magazine so my list will just keep getting bigger

Christine

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Don't know whats on your list but ...

If you are near the Plaza Mayor and the Metropolitan Cathedral, the ladies selling sweet gorditas (proper name escapes me just now) are not to be missed for a simple, traditional snack. I found that the weekend taco and antojito vendors on the Plaza just to the east of the Cathedral, by the Plaza Mayor museum are really great - just watch out for the salsa verde: it was bien rica pero se pica mucho!

At the opposite end of the Plaza, down about 2 blocks to Calle Uruguay, take a right and walk about two more blocks to Panaderia La Ideal. They have a second floor showroom of wedding and quinceanera cakes worth the trip alone. The bakery has every manner of pan dulces and wonderful breads. If you're lucky they'll have some of their breads woven and decorated to look like little caimanes ... fresh water alligators.

Out the door and to your right again, walk all the way to Lazaro Cardenas - a huge boulevard. Turn left at Cardenas and either one or two blocks up is the Churreria El Moro. Open 24/7, and covered to the eyebrows in blue and white glazed tiles, it serves three styles of hot chocolate and freshly made churros.

Behind the Metropolitan Cathedral is a bar called Las Sirenas, with rooftop seating. The margaritas are crisp and the view is wonderful - it looks out over the excavations of the Aztec Templo Mayor.

Going up Calle Tacuba, running west from the Met Cathedral, you will find Las Girasoles and the Cafe Tacuba. Girasoles will be featuring the traditional foods of the season. It is a lovely place, the duck in blackberry mole (not entirely traditional, that one) is yummy, and the Margaritas de Tamarindo are lethal.

Cafe Tacuba is quaint, the food is good - enchiladas, etc. It was a favorite b'fast spot of Frida Kahlo's.

South a block or two to Calle Cinco de Mayo puts you at the Bar La Opera and the Dulceria de Celaya - both dating to the era of Porfirio Diaz. La Opera is the quintessential gentleman's lunching establishment (women are welcome), and there are still a few bullet holes in the elegant stamped tin ceiling said to have been put there by Villa when he and his troops arrived in the DF and he rode, literally, in for lunch. It is claimed there are photos to prove it. Their watercress salad is suberb.

If, however, you are looking for something quite haute, then either the Zona Rosa for Tezka (owned by Juan Mari Arzak or Arzak in San Sebastian, Spain; Chef was Bruno Oteiza), or in Polanco for Izote (Patricia Quintana's restaurant). Both do, I believe have web presences, and both are wonderful.

And if you do not make any of these places, you will still have wonderfual food. Mexico is just a fabulous food country.

Regards,

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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Don't know whats on your list but ...

If you are near the Plaza Mayor and the Metropolitan Cathedral, the ladies selling sweet gorditas (proper name escapes me just now) are not to be missed for a simple, traditional snack. I found that the weekend taco and antojito vendors on the Plaza just to the east of the Cathedral, by the Plaza Mayor museum are really great - just watch out for the salsa verde: it was bien rica pero se pica mucho!

At the opposite end of the Plaza, down about 2 blocks to Calle Uruguay, take a right and walk about two more blocks to Panaderia La Ideal. They have a second floor showroom of wedding and quinceanera cakes worth the trip alone. The bakery has every manner of pan dulces and wonderful breads. If you're lucky they'll have some of their breads woven and decorated to look like little caimanes ... fresh water alligators.

Out the door and to your right again, walk all the way to Lazaro Cardenas - a huge boulevard. Turn left at Cardenas and either one or two blocks up is the Churreria El Moro. Open 24/7, and covered to the eyebrows in blue and white glazed tiles, it serves three styles of hot chocolate and freshly made churros.

Behind the Metropolitan Cathedral is a bar called Las Sirenas, with rooftop seating. The margaritas are crisp and the view is wonderful - it looks out over the excavations of the Aztec Templo Mayor.

Going up Calle Tacuba, running west from the Met Cathedral, you will find Las Girasoles and the Cafe Tacuba. Girasoles will be featuring the traditional foods of the season. It is a lovely place, the duck in blackberry mole (not entirely traditional, that one) is yummy, and the Margaritas de Tamarindo are lethal.

Cafe Tacuba is quaint, the food is good - enchiladas, etc. It was a favorite b'fast spot of Frida Kahlo's.

South a block or two to Calle Cinco de Mayo puts you at the Bar La Opera and the Dulceria de Celaya - both dating to the era of Porfirio Diaz. La Opera is the quintessential gentleman's lunching establishment (women are welcome), and there are still a few bullet holes in the elegant stamped tin ceiling said to have been put there by Villa when he and his troops arrived in the DF and he rode, literally, in for lunch. It is claimed there are photos to prove it. Their watercress salad is suberb.

If, however, you are looking for something quite haute, then either the Zona Rosa for Tezka (owned by Juan Mari Arzak or Arzak in San Sebastian, Spain; Chef was Bruno Oteiza), or in Polanco for Izote (Patricia Quintana's restaurant). Both do, I believe have web presences, and both are wonderful.

I would also heartily recommend the food stalls in Mercado La Merced ... it is to the east and south of the Palacio del Gobierno on the Plaza Mayor. However, Mexico City can be quite dicey off the main paths, and I feel leaving that to your best judgment is appropriate. I go myself w/o hesitation, but I do know others (Mx nationals as well as foreigners) who have been relieved of money, documents, etc.

And if you do not make any of these places, you will still have wonderfual food. Mexico is just a fabulous food country.

Regards,

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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  • 1 year later...

I will be in Mexico City by the end of June. Any good place to eat not to be missed? Also, I have heard story about MC and how tourists are the easy target of crime/scam. Is it really that bad? What is the best transportation getting to Condessa from the airport. Thanks.

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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You might find some helpful hints here

Eating in DF

Regarding crime. Tourists are always an easy target of crime or scam no matter where you travel. Have your smarts about you and you'll be fine.

In over 12 years of travelling to Mexico I've never had a problem.

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What is the best transportation getting to Condessa from the airport.  Thanks.

While it's true, as Shelora says, that crime happens everywhere, one does have to be particularly vigilant in Mexico City.

Especially when it comes to taxis.

DO NOT HAIL CABS ON THE STREET.

When you arrive in Mexico City, follow the signs to the taxi stand. The way it works is that you purchase a chit, or voucher, from the cashier, and then you get into an authorized cab. From your hotel, always have them call a cab for you. And when you are finished doing whatever you're doing, have the restaurant or shop or whatever call another cab.

We were just in DF and had a great time. We took a cab from el centro out to Izote, and our cab driver waited for us to finish, so that worked out.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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You might find some helpful hints here

Eating in DF

Also this thread: DF/Taxco

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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While certainly not exhaustive, my thread of my trip has some MC dining with photos.

I never really felt unsafe there. One needs to be careful like any big city. The taxi advice above is very good.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I guess I like a little edge to my life, I always hail cabs on the street. Never by myself mind you and never at night. I love those VW bug taxis!

If staying in DF for a few days, we usually plan out a longer distance trip in the city. We accomplish this by hiring a car and driver - usually through the hotel. It's brilliant and very affordable, except during New Year's Eve and NY's day, when neither brilliance or affordability enter into the scenario. But that is another story.

Edited by shelora (log)
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If staying in DF for a few days, we usually plan out a longer distance trip in the city. We accomplish this by hiring a car and driver - usually through the hotel. It's brilliant and very affordable,

Yes, that's what I usually do as well. Nice not to worry about where the next cab is coming from, or when, and the driver can collect and safeguard your packages if you're shopping.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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never having been in DF before, and very few "fine dining" meals under my belt in any city, I'd still repeat our recent meal at Izote in a heartbeat - wonderful food, terrific presentation, and entrees in the 16-22 USD range

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While certainly not exhaustive, my thread of my trip has some MC dining with photos.

Can't believe I hadn't noticed that thread before, but went there today. Absolutely wonderful read. You are to be thanked profusely, and congratulated endlessly.

So, thanks and congratulations.

Well done.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Thanks for all the advices...By the way, what's DF??

Mexico City is the capital of the nation. Drawn around it is a federal district. It's like Washington DC. So the official name is Mexico Distrito Federal. In the US we often refer to "DC. In a similar manner, Mexicans routinely refer to their capital as "DF."

Although, if you're actually in Mexico, and people refer to just "Mexico," that's also Mexico City.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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You've chosen a great time of the year to visit the Distrito Federal, the weather is perfect, cool in the morning, hot after noon and back to cool for early evening. In fact bring a light sweater if you expect to be out after 7 or 8 PM when it does turn chilly. As to the cab ride from the airport, you have to purchase a ticket for cabs inside the terminal and a ride from there to Condesa (my nabe --more commonly referred to as Condechi ) might cost between $150 Pesos (1bag and a 4 door sedan) to $300 P for 2 to 4 bags and a van. DO NOT pay for anything bigger than a 4 door if you don't need it. The ride can vary depending on the arrival hour, anything between 7 AM and 9PM can be a horror and last an hour or more. The cab ride between 10 PM and 6AM is usually about 15 to 20 minutes! Its a BIG city and traffic jams anywhere are not uncommon. But if you are actually staying in Condesa think of the West Village deserted with 2 beautiful parks and incomparable dining ever other step. My own recommendations for this area are (1) Ticoncito for tacos al pastor (2) El Bajio,just opened after 35 years a second spot, in Parque Delta on Ave. Cuahetemoc (3) El Raco on Ave. Sonora (across from Parque Mexico), catalan style, for their salt baked huachinango (4) La Botica, Campeche 396, for Mezcal tastings (5) Frutos Prohibidos, Amsterdam 244 for help with the hang over in the form of great fresh juice combinations and finally (6) for a great view and relaxed snacking the roof top terrace of the Condesa DF hotel on Ave. Veracruz a stones throw from Praque Espana. There is so MUCH more in the rest of the city aka. Jardin del Pulpo in Coyacan on the corner of the public market, Fonda San Angel on the Plaza Jacinto ( Saturday artesanias market), El Tajin also in Coyacan for breakfast and lunch ( owner Alicia D'Angeli was foremost in the proposal to UNESCO to designate Mexican cuisine Patrimonio Oral y Intangible). I'd better end now but if you want more -- just let me know!

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Good tips Ruth; I didn´t know about the second Bajio! Now here´s a tip for you: arriving at the airport, if you walk to the escalators located between "sala C" and "sala D", go up, cross the bridge, and go down on your left, there is a taxi sitio, used by airport employees and those in the know. These are metered cabs and a trip to La Condesa, also my neighborhood, costs around 80-90 pesos! So it is not necesary to take those overpriced ticket taxis.

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  • 5 weeks later...
Good tips Ruth; I didn´t know about the second Bajio! Now here´s a tip for you: arriving at the airport, if you walk to the escalators located between "sala C" and "sala D", go up, cross the bridge, and go down on your left, there is a taxi sitio, used by airport employees and those in the know. These are metered cabs and a trip to La Condesa, also my neighborhood, costs around 80-90 pesos! So it is not necesary to take those overpriced ticket taxis.

nickarte: FYI -- Slow Food DF convivium is sponsoring a "Xoconostle mi Amor" day trip to the ex-hacienda San Jose del Marques in Hidalgo on Saturday July 29. Cost for SF members is $250P and $60P for transportation, non-members $300P. For more information call or e-mail Giorgio D'Angeli at El Tajin # 5659-5759/ 58124292 or giorgio@avantel.net.

Laboratorio n. 52

Xoconostle mi amor

Muchos ignoran las virtudes culinarias del xoconostle.

Es dulce, ágrio, versátil, delicioso, sorprendente.

Está conquistando grandes mercados en el mundo.

Te invitamos a conocerlo de cerca el sábado 29 de julio

en la ex-hacienda San José del Marques en Hidalgo.

El menú de esta fiesta campirana incluye:

Curados de pulque y Enchiladas de la Hacienda

Ensalada de jícama, lechuga de Ixmiquilpan, zanahorias

y xoconoxtle con vinagreta de miel de xoconostle

Mixiote de cordero de Hidalgo

Barbacoa de hoyo de Hidalgo

Salsa de molcajete con Xoconostle y Salsa borracha al pulque

Tortillas de maíz criollo hechas a mano

Bombín de Xoconostle con helado de coco orgánico

(receta de Alicia Gironella De Angeli)

Dulces de xoconostle de la Hacienda

Agua de Xoconostle

Cerveza.

Saldremos a las 10.30 a. m. en camión de lujo desde el Auditorio Nacional, regresando por la tarde alrededor de las 6 p.m.

Costo: Socios de SF y un acompañante: $250 c/u.

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Good tips Ruth; I didn´t know about the second Bajio! Now here´s a tip for you: arriving at the airport, if you walk to the escalators located between "sala C" and "sala D", go up, cross the bridge, and go down on your left, there is a taxi sitio, used by airport employees and those in the know. These are metered cabs and a trip to La Condesa, also my neighborhood, costs around 80-90 pesos! So it is not necesary to take those overpriced ticket taxis.

Now THERE's a great tip! Do they also have vans there for larger parties? (I mean, um, you know, 'larger parties' meaning 'more people'?)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
So sorry that you had such bad luck on this. The trip was "absolutely fabulous". When I learn how to post pics I will!

I would love to see them. My pulque hacienda trip and luncheon back in March was the highlight of an already incredible trip.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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So sorry that you had such bad luck on this. The trip was "absolutely fabulous". When I learn how to post pics I will!

Please let me/us know if there are any more of these trips...as you know from living here, it's hard to get information about anything! I have YET to figure out how to get opera tickets on the day they go on sale...

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Do start buying El Universal on Thursday morning early because they have augmented the Friday "Estilos" section with a magazine section called Menu! It has a calendar of events, recipes and interviews with the foremost culinary luminaries of the DF. It is trying to provide an all inclusive view of all things FOOD.

As for the Slow Food programs there might not be another until October. I will post as soon as I know and hope you can join us next time. I will personally get you the tickets. Slow Food is in need of of an infusion of "new blood" here and hopefully you would enjoy yourself so much you might want to join.

Let me say that the food is incredible every time I have been to an event and that the initiated are quick to respond. I will be posting a story on the Xoconostle trip on www.international-iacp.blogspot.com during the next week but the report on the Dia de las Ciruelas is still on the site. It is at the bottom of the page. It might make "la boca agua" as they say but go ahead risk it.

As well, don't know if you've heard but Chef Richard (Ricardo) Sandoval is coming back home to the DF. With Maya and Pompano restaurants in NYC , Zengo and Tamayo in DC and Denver he is about to open right here in my backyard of Condesa! Sometime in mid-September will be the grand opening of Hippodromo Hotel and Hip Kitchen on Ave. Mexico just north of Ave. Sonora.

More later!

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