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A Patric

Demo: Making Chocolate at Home....From Bean to Bar

64 posts in this topic

How about to Israel? I put this demo link on our local chocolate forum. I just loved the demo. Now I want togo check out the site. I hope that packaging that was talked about is also there!

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How about to Israel? I put this demo link on our local chocolate forum. I just loved the demo. Now I want togo check out the site. I hope that packaging that was talked about is also there!

Hi Lior,

Well, unfortunately anything outside of North America isn't even on the radar at the moment.

As for the packaging, you can see it at http://www.Patric-Chocolate.com

The theme of the site, with the painting of the cacao pods, is based upon the packaging. You can also see a small version if you click on the 70% Madagascar bar to read the description.

However, the photo is still relatively small. So, I have uploaded a few larger photos that you can find here, including one of the unwrapped bars:

Package 1

Package 2

Package 3

Package 4

Bars

Enjoy!

Alan

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Very nice!!! Can't wait to order some....

and make my own as soon as the piggy bank allows...


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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I met up with Alan today at the NY chocolate show and was thrilled to get some of his chocolate. A couple of eG'ers and I have just been sitting around analysing the show and tasting Alan's chocolate.

We are smitten. It is fabulous. Fruity, smooth, beautifully tempered, a joy to enjoy.

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I met up with Alan today at the NY chocolate show and was thrilled to get some of his chocolate.  A couple of eG'ers and I have just been sitting around analysing the show and tasting Alan's chocolate.

We are smitten.  It is fabulous.  Fruity, smooth, beautifully tempered, a joy to enjoy.

Where's that "I'm so jealous" emoticon when you need it??? :biggrin:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'm looking forward to trying it. I was really busy at work this week, then he was gone for the show at the end of the week. I tried calling yesterday but he wasn't available (I didn't expect him to be on a saturday but thought since I had some time it was worth a try). I'm going to call again on monday. Kerry's seal of approval makes me even more sure of the decision I'd already made to order 20 bars (I can already picture the faces of anybody overhearing the call "Yeah, send me a kilo of the good stuff") and feature it as part of a chocolate party I have to put together.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Hi all,

Rather than take up too much space by posting a number of links to various reviews of the 70% Madagascar bar and new Patric Chocolate articles/interviews, let me just offer one link where I have compiled them:

http://www.patric-chocolate.com/store/press_and_bio.php

A few of the links are particularly relevant to this thread as I talk about some of my processes in quite a bit of detail. These are particularly in the interviews. However, the chocolate reviews will also be interesting to those who have followed this thread.

And by the way, since I haven't mentioned it in a while, if you aren't on my mailing list already, then you can sign up here. The sign-up box is on the top-right.

Best,

Alan

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I have to say, when I first visited your website, that picture of the chocolate tempering kinda looks like, um... something else.


PS: I am a guy.

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Now we have Inno Melangeurs and CocoaT Grindeurs specifically designed for chocolate procesing. The roller stones assembly come as one piece for easy cleaning and to reduce the chocolate liquor waste. Specially designed conical stones enhances the grinding process. Our Grindeurs can easily produce chocolate liquor at 30 micron size.

These are also great for the marzepan, Gianduja and other nut pastes. More details can b found at cocoatown.com.

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Now we have Inno Melangeurs and CocoaT Grindeurs specifically designed for chocolate procesing. The roller stones assembly come as one piece for easy cleaning and to reduce the chocolate liquor waste. Specially designed conical stones enhances the grinding process. Our Grindeurs can easily produce chocolate liquor at 30 micron size.

These are also great for the marzepan, Gianduja and other nut pastes. More details can b found at cocoatown.com.

Alan's original demo shows using the champion juicer to make the chocolate liquor - can I assume that these units just allow you to drop in the roasted nibs? Do you need to grind the sugar fine -- or can it be thrown in as is?

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From my understanding, the juicer is for breaking down the nibs. I have the juicer and have done crude chocolate batches. The juicer uses metal little teeth to chew up whatever you put in the machine. It also heats everything up because of the friction. This may affect the texture of the chocolate if you put sugar into the juicer with the nibs. I have never done so. I do use a vita mix or now the thermamix to blend in sugar. I rarely make chocolate from scratch so this is my experience. Hey, I do plan on getting a melanger for small batch production soon!

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From my understanding, the juicer is for breaking down the nibs. I have the juicer and have done crude chocolate batches. The juicer uses metal little teeth to chew up whatever you put in the machine. It also heats everything up because of the friction. This may affect the texture of the chocolate if you put sugar into the juicer with the nibs. I have never done so. I do use a vita mix or now the thermamix to blend in sugar. I rarely make chocolate from scratch so this is my experience. Hey, I do plan on getting a melanger for small batch production soon!

I think the latest on the Chocolate Alchemy site has you doing without the juicer - I think i heard for these newer grinders that adjustments had been made to the pressure of the rollers on the stone - eliminating that first step. Hope kitchenspecialist can confirm.

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