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Garbage Bowl


eJulia
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Fianlly convinced my husband that we can't garden without a compost pile and boy is he a convert. No more dragging big plastic bags full of dirt from the nursery but getting the most beautiful sweet smelling compost from your own veggie scraps.

We use a rectangular porcelain enamel containier the size of a shoebox which has a lid as a "GB".

My next trick will be the acres of plastic wrap that he swathes everything in. When Robert wraps it stays super fresh, though.

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I use a large steel bowl as well. Many moons ago I used a plastic "Tupperware" bowl, but found it stained so badly (even with regular washing) that it wasn't too appealing sitting on the counter. I also tried a countertop "pail" that someone had given me, but found it too awkward.

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

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i have used a garbage bowl since i was trained by "father phil" in the kitchen at the chequit inn on shelter island. it was sop. we had other bowls for the finished mise. it saves time and agita!!!

tonight i did meatloaf, stuffed tomatoes and oven roasted potatoes. two of the products required onions. just peeled and popped the peelings into the garbage bowl, finely chopped the onion and put what i would need for the tomatoes into another bowl since i didn't need to cook them at the moment. shallot skins? into the garbage bowl. garlic skins? into the garbage bowl. tomato seeds? into the garbage bowl. cooked off fat from the meatloaf? not into the garbage bowl. into a saved instant coffee can then into the garbage :raz:

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Funny how this discussion of RR's GB :raz: has developed a subtext of "Composte it!" vs "Seal it in a landfill for all eternity!" :shock: . One thing that kind of bugged me about Rachel Ray's garbage bowl was the indiscriminate mixing of compost-able and non-organic trash. The implied message is that the contents of the "garbage bowl" will wind up in a plastic bag, destined for a giant land fill somewhere in Staten Island or Jersey.

Yes, I realize that Rachel Ray's Thirty-minute-meal "kitchen" is a studio set in Chelsea. Her own kitchen (in the Village??) is probably tiny, and it's doubtful that she has room for a garden. Still, is she really setting a good example by dumping everything into the same bowl?

My fantasy is that there's some hapless FoodTV flack (Hello, summer internship!) who actually compiles media references to RR's shows. Is there any chance that this discussion will make it's way back to her? If so, here's my advice to RR and producers: Keep the "Garbage Bowl" concept, but separate the compost-able stuff from the plastic. It's a subtle message, but some of us notice these things. :wink:

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I just moved to a city with municipal composting. The program includes all foods (even meat!) and food-soiled paper, so I started using paper lunch bags.
Good girl! Isn't it amazing how little regular trash you have when you compost? What a waste garbage is! Between composting and recycling I now have one small shopping bag worth of garbage a week now.

I love, love, love our curbside composting. I especially love that all of my abandoned leftovers and expired items are useful, in some way.

As for Fifi's "yuck" factor of meat scraps in compost, the SF recycling site says:

What happens to the food scraps and other organic materials after they are collected from customers?

Organic materials collected in San Francisco will be transferred to a modern composting facility and mixed with yard waste from suburban communities. The end product is rich compost that is especially high in nitrogen thanks to the food scraps. This compost is the favorite of professional landscapers, farmers, and nurseries in Northern California.

Reporting back: I've made copious use of my new countertop compost pail in the last week, and I really like it. I'm finding all sorts of things to line it with: butcher meat wrappers, the little piece of paper that they put under takeout pizza, unfolded chinese take-out cartons, etc.

{edited to add links}

Edited by ScorchedPalate (log)

Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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Funny how this discussion of RR's GB has developed a subtext of "Composte it!" vs "Seal it in a landfill for all eternity!". One thing that kind of bugged me about Rachel Ray's garbage bowl was the indiscriminate mixing of compost-able and non-organic trash. The implied message is that the contents of the "garbage bowl" will wind up in a plastic bag, destined for a giant land fill somewhere in Staten Island or Jersey.

Yes, I realize that Rachel Ray's Thirty-minute-meal "kitchen" is a studio set in Chelsea. Her own kitchen (in the Village??) is probably tiny, and it's doubtful that she has room for a garden. Still, is she really setting a good example by dumping everything into the same bowl?

My fantasy is that there's some hapless FoodTV flack (Hello, summer internship!) who actually compiles media references to RR's shows. Is there any chance that this discussion will make it's way back to her? If so, here's my advice to RR and producers: Keep the "Garbage Bowl" concept, but separate the compost-able stuff from the plastic. It's a subtle message, but some of us notice these things.

That always bothered me too. Particularly when Rachel dumps can lids (sharp--ouch!) in the bowl with the organic material. That poor intern better look carefully when cleaning it out.

Getting back to the original question, my work area is one step from the sink and trash can, so I just dump (or toss) organic stuff in there for the disposal and throw the non-organic stuff in the trash. The cans also go to the sink and are set aside for recycling. No, it probably is not the most efficient method. I have toyed with the idea with working with a garbage bowl, but would rather not dump everything in one bowl.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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I try to use the produce bags from the market ....but i really just wish I could leave the lid off the can and fling things like at work ....but we have nosey dogs lid must stay on......and there isnt an "underemployed guy" at home to sweep up after me like in the kitchen at work.

T

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

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I normally don't use a GB, but the times that I have, it really has saved a lot of time. I just don't have the counter space to keep it around all the time. However, I've thought a lot about composting lately, so maybe it's time to make the room. As someone who knows little about composting, other than the theory, does it create much of an odor? I have a yard and could put it in a corner away from the deck, but that puts it pretty close to the neighbors....will they hate me for the smell???

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Cooking something that produces a small amount of waste- use the empty produce bag. Cooking something that produces large amount of waste (shucking many ears of corn, cooking multiple dishes)- bring the garbage can out from under the sink, and park it next to me.

No composting or grinding here, live in an apartment, without these options.

“"When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what's the first thing you say to yourself?"

"What's for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?"

"I say, I wonder what's going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet.

Pooh nodded thoughtfully.

"It's the same thing," he said.”

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Sometimes I use a garbage bowl and sometimes a styrofoam tray from whatever it is I am prepping.

I can't compost as we don't have a back garden but our town is experimenting with picking up compostable material. I don't have room for their enormous green bin in the back or their smaller in-house bin in my tiny kitchen! So far our area is not part of the experiment and I am praying that this is one experiment that fails. One size does not fit all.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I normally don't use a GB, but the times that I have, it really has saved a lot of time.  I just don't have the counter space to keep it around all the time.  However, I've thought a lot about composting lately, so maybe it's time to make the room.  As someone who knows little about composting, other than the theory, does it create much of an odor?  I have a yard and could put it in a corner away from the deck, but that puts it pretty close to the neighbors....will they hate me for the smell???

Our compost doesn't smell at all but it does attract little gnat type flies so we keep it away from doors and windows. I can only smell it when I take the lid off to dump stuff in.

Inside we have a mini pail with lid we keep under the sink for compost- we fill it about every 2 days.

Sometimes I use the GB sometimes not. Just depends on what I'm making.

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I'm also someone who uses the empty produce bags. I do also use the trays that some vegetables come in. If it's a really small job (i.e. chopping up a small onion and a couple cloves of garlic), I have even just use a piece of paper towel.

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OK I'll be the dissenting voice. Everything gets swept into my 1HP WasteKing and

ground up.  I don't compost and I barely recycle. There I said it. I bet I'm not the only one flaunting the environmentalists either.   :unsure:

In Philadelphia, I believe, grinding your garbage is considered a form of recycling.

Edited to add that when I don't want to plug my garbage disposall with too many potato peels, etc., I do use a bowl.

Edited by Mottmott (log)

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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If you're making repeated trips to the garbage can, or you're continuously pulling a garbage can out of and putting it back into a cabinet, you're wasting time. If Ms. Ray is teaching people not to do that, she's providing a valuable service.

Of course, it doesn't have to be a bowl. I use whatever I can use: the clear plastic box from the cherry tomatoes, the blue plastic bin that the mushrooms come in, etc. I usually prep whatever item is in a good waste receptacle first, so I can use that for the rest of the stuff. If there's no ready receptacle, I use deli and Chinese-food takeout containers. Occasionally, I use a bowl.

For larger amounts of prep, I pull a garbage can right up to the counter and put it on a chair so it's at counter height.

Also, some kitchen tasks are best performed over the garbage can, bowl, sink or other receptacle. Peeling cucumbers, carrots or anything like that -- do it directly into the trash.

In New York City there is no composting program that I know of, so that's not an issue for me. Those who wish to compost and have the ability to do so, however, should be able to use two receptacles instead of one.

Sink disposals are nice but they won't accommodate everything, so when I've used them (they're not terribly common in New York City apartment buildings) I've found they don't save me from needing a place for garbage anyway.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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A note from your host:

Folks, this is just a gentle reminder that discussing the mechanics of composting or environmentalism is not a food- or cooking-related topic--and it's therefore not permitted here at eGullet. There are plenty of other Web sites that can provide you with thorough information if you are interested in the subject. Meanwhile, let's keep the discussion to garbage bowls and how you gather your food scraps. Posts specifically about composting have been and will continue to be deleted. PM me if you have questions about this. Thanks.

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Between us and the dogs we go through so much yogurt - especially plain that we collect dozens

and dozens of the large plastic tubs that it comes in, not the small size, but the big size. I started

using them for this purpose and just put a lid on and throw away in the trash bag. This works well

having a lid if liquids develope etc, unfortunately here we cannot recycle that sort of plastic or I

certainly would. A hui hou...........

"You can't miss with a ham 'n' egger......"

Ervin D. Williams 9/1/1921 - 6/8/2004

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