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NickV

Big Green Egg

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TikiDoc-- Beautiful GD!! Did you have to finish the cart?


Its good to have Morels

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I've had a BGE for 7 years and will just add to the chorus of praise. It's certainly not magic and some of the BGE fans can be overly effusive with their praise. That said.... the BGE is easily the best grill I've ever used.

Once you get used to controlling the temperature after a few sessions, you'll find it incredibly easy to set up a long and stable cook times. I cook pork shoulders/butts on my BGE at 250 for 8-12 hours all the time and it couldn't be easier. Even after 12 hours, there's usually enough charcoal left to run it back up to a high temp so for big cookouts I'll cook my pork for about 12 hours, and after that heat the EGG back up to 500 - 600 to sear some steaks.

In terms of accessories, I would strongly recommend that you get the plate setter. I'm also a big fan of the electric starter. One thing to be prepared for, they are HEAVY. Plan to have someone around who can help you assemble it.

Lastly, I live and work in Atlanta and happen to know the BGE folks personally -- for what it's worth, they're really great people and a great company, it's the rare occasion where you can feel great about both a product and the people selling it.

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Ive been thinking about a smaller one for some time. There is really nowhere near me to see them all. Its clear from reading the various posts here and else where that there is indeed a 'cult' for this but thats not necessarily a bad thing.

japanese knives have a 'cult' following, but those who enjoy them and understand there use and how to sharpen them really enjoy them.

one question: the 'burp' : is that opening the lid partially first to let out the hot air, then opening the lid fully?

Ive seen web sites of stores that carry all of them and all the stuff to go with them. Looks like fun places to visit with your wallet lock up else where!

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one question: the 'burp' : is that opening the lid partially first to let out the hot air, then opening the lid fully?

That's exactly what it is. If you open it right away you can end up with what is essentially a backdraft. I've never seen anything that major but it is real. Please note this is only a concern at high temperatures.

This site has a good description of it: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/flash.htm


Edited by Steve Hiller (log)

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thanks for the nakedwhiz ref. lots of interesting stuff there!

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TikiDoc-- Beautiful GD!! Did you have to finish the cart?

Yea, but it was not a big deal. Got it done in a weekend (not a weekend's worth of work, but a weekend of putting on a coat, letting it dry and then another coat when I had a few minutes to spare). The cart is a great thing to have - it provides a bunch of work space and is very easy to move.

Other accessories that are essential, in my opinion - the place setter (the one for the BGE fits in perfectly) and an electric starter, which you can pick up for under $20 at Home Depot. It works great and you will never need to buy lighter fluid again.

There is a quick learning curve with these things, especially in regards to perfecting "low and slow". Once you get it, it is easy to keep the temperature very constant with a minimum of effort. I am still working on ways to get and keep the temp up in the really high range for pizza.

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Also consider the 'big steel keg' as another low cost alternative unless your sold on the looks of the egg, bsk is insulated steel instead of ceramic. Costs about half if I remember right, I have one and like it for all the same reasons the egg gets raves for.

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Just purchased my second large Egg at my wife's request :laugh:

I am a member of the cult, but you could never meet better people

They will help you with any issues and your recipe " to do " list will grow to pages :wink:

http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=last25&do=show&sel=24&Itemid=188

If you can get to an Eggfest in your area, you can see how "crazy" we are :laugh:

It is a purchase you will never regret

Shane

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I know I am a little late in replying to this thread but if you still have not purchased your BGE you should take a look at the Primo XL. I have one and love it. It is oval so I feel it fits food a little better than the egg. You can also splt the firebox for indirect cooks. Finally it is made in the USA (Georgia) if that matters to you.

No matter what you end up buying (egg, gd, bsk etc) you are going to love kamado cooking. It is by far my favorite "grill/smoker" I have ever owned.

My setup

IMG_1391.JPG

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Also consider the 'big steel keg' as another low cost alternative unless your sold on the looks of the egg, bsk is insulated steel instead of ceramic. Costs about half if I remember right, I have one and like it for all the same reasons the egg gets raves for.

The Big Steel Keg also features a solidly built set of legs. This Keg's insulation provides for a cool exterior and different thermal properties compared to the ceramic Egg's heavy mass. I assume that it may be somewhat easier to lower the cooking temp by restricting air; lowering temp in a ceramic Egg is a lost cause. I also remember reading that the insulated Keg has a much lower humidity level than a ceramic Egg but don't know the impact on cooking results.

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Ime very interested in the 'Primo' if you have one, whats the clearance at the grill for lets way St. Louis ribs?

can you fit (xxx) number on the grill rack? 4? 6?

thanks for this tip!

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Also consider the 'big steel keg' as another low cost alternative unless your sold on the looks of the egg, bsk is insulated steel instead of ceramic. Costs about half if I remember right, I have one and like it for all the same reasons the egg gets raves for.

The Big Steel Keg also features a solidly built set of legs. This Keg's insulation provides for a cool exterior and different thermal properties compared to the ceramic Egg's heavy mass. I assume that it may be somewhat easier to lower the cooking temp by restricting air; lowering temp in a ceramic Egg is a lost cause. I also remember reading that the insulated Keg has a much lower humidity level than a ceramic Egg but don't know the impact on cooking results.

Actually the keg is difficult to drop the temp on as well, I've read it's more difficult than the egg but I've never used an egg so I don't know personally. I have the IQ pitmaster controller (a fan with a temp probe that controls the air flow into the keg or egg and so controls the temp), I have to set it initially about 20degF lower than target temp or the temp will overshoot and not come down for a long time. After it stabilizes I set the temp to target and it truly is hands off for hours after that point, great for low and slow.

The keg comes with legs and side tables and is light enough to move around easily. Also there is a trailer hitch accessory so you can load it on your truck and take it with you to the prairie dog shoot (bad joke). Takes all the egg accessories also.

I'm very happy with mine.

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Very true, if you overshoot your target temp for a low and slow , with the Egg.

You will have a hell of a time, getting it anywhere near, where you wanted it.

Grab some beer and stand right there,DO NOT LEAVE, 30/50* before your target temp, you start shutting down vents

My best, was setting everything up and getting distracted(beer) and coming back to a 1000 degree Egg :blush:

Made some great burgers that night instead :laugh:

Shane


Edited by Mr Holloway (log)

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Alton Brown had one of his best show: 'Right on Q' and mentioned the

IQ pitmaster controller

I think its stunning.

But here in my question:

how does a ceramic cooker do anything better then lets way a

"""gas Webber""" :unsure: (with wood chips)?

two things you need for the BBQ: a constant heat source

and a way to regulate it to your cooking project?

as long as you understand how to add 'wood smoke' to a gas webber

well you are back into the game.

consider this book:

BBQ America

if you do 'Q' look into this book.

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Ime very interested in the 'Primo' if you have one, whats the clearance at the grill for lets way St. Louis ribs?

can you fit (xxx) number on the grill rack? 4? 6?

thanks for this tip!

I have only done 2 st louis style racks at once but I think I could have fit at least 2-4 more comfortably (with the extended racks) especially if you are willing to cut them.

Here is a picture of a guy who has 10 baby backs on his XL. This is not mine, and a little overstuffed IMO but you get the idea. I think based on the shape you can get more food on it than a BGE large.

ovalfull.jpg

Pic was taken from this thread

http://askabutcher.p...play&thread=170

BTW I use the auber controler. It is very similar to the pitmaster. It holds the temp rock steady and allows me to get some sleep on those long overnight cooks :)


Edited by BeerCan (log)

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My father-in-law picked me up an old, medium Kamado at a garage sale for $50 and I love it. I just recently purchased the place-setter for it but prior to that I had concocted a setup of sheet metal to rise my pork butt off the flames and it worked pretty well. I would start a butt at 11pm at night and cook through to the next afternoon with one load of coal and still have some leftovers (though closer to the 1/4 left as mentioned above). I'm still learning when to vent and how much but even I've been able to keep it in the 220-280 range without much work.

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My father-in-law picked me up an old, medium Kamado at a garage sale for $50 and I love it. I just recently purchased the place-setter for it but prior to that I had concocted a setup of sheet metal to rise my pork butt off the flames and it worked pretty well. I would start a butt at 11pm at night and cook through to the next afternoon with one load of coal and still have some leftovers (though closer to the 1/4 left as mentioned above). I'm still learning when to vent and how much but even I've been able to keep it in the 220-280 range without much work.

I also have an old/old kamado,I have looked at the green eggs and it I am sure works as well, I never use it for grilling,since I have a gas Char Glogrill on an island in the kitchen,along with a 1200 cfm exhaust fan,Just did a great big pulled pork for the 4thwaith the kamado,and as usual it was real good...I got mine from a thrift store for $25about ten or so years ago...

Bud

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Ime very interested in the 'Primo' if you have one, whats the clearance at the grill for lets way St. Louis ribs?

can you fit (xxx) number on the grill rack? 4? 6?

thanks for this tip!

I have a primo XL and did St Louis cut spareribs for the the Fourth of July. I did two slabs, with both of them on the extended racks - they just fit on the extanded racks. I could easily have put another two slabs on the main racks. With some type of rack to hold them upright you could probably do more. The extended racks are the upper ones seen in the BeerCan's photo above.

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Alton Brown had one of his best show: 'Right on Q' and mentioned the

IQ pitmaster controller

I think its stunning.

But here in my question:

how does a ceramic cooker do anything better then lets way a

"""gas Webber""" :unsure: (with wood chips)?

two things you need for the BBQ: a constant heat source

and a way to regulate it to your cooking project?

as long as you understand how to add 'wood smoke' to a gas webber

well you are back into the game.

consider this book:

http://www.amazon.co...0562513-3418907

if you do 'Q' look into this book.

Rotuts,

I really don't know, never tried low and slow on a weber.

I used to do turkeys on a charcoal weber which always turned out pretty good but they were cooked at normal oven temps and times, with the added tastieness of smoke, those turkeys were always the first picked to the bone at large multi-turkey thanksgiving gatherings.

So I don't know how well one would perform for low and slow but I'd be surprised if I could set one up for 190degF at night with a big ol' pork but and a good load of charcoal, go to bed, and get up in the morning to find it still doing fine.

The other thing is the high temps you can get to in that insulated tube for pizza or whatever, and as someone else mentioned baking in the summer.

Maybe a weber would do fine.

Hopefully someone with experience with both will chime in, you've got me curious.

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I have a three burner Webber Gas grill. By using only the front burner ( where you place your wood-chips on the 'flavor-bar' ) and with the additional information I got from Alton Browns "Right on Q" ie turning the propane tank to barely open, you can get the Webber to run as low as 180 - 190 even on warm days. Just keep it out of the sun! and coolerday, you just adjust the gas to get to your target!

But I must say the "Primo XL" is talking to me, right now!

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But I must say the "Primo XL" is talking to me, right now!

Do it! :raz: I really don't regret my purchase at all. Initial costs are a little high, but for me it was totally worth it. I love cooking outdoors, in fact I have tangerine glazed chicken on mine right now :-)

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I used to do turkeys on a charcoal weber....

So I don't know how well one would perform for low and slow but I'd be surprised if I could set one up for 190degF at night with a big ol' pork but and a good load of charcoal, go to bed, and get up in the morning to find it still doing fine.

Hopefully someone with experience with both will chime in, you've got me curious.

In my experience, the only reliable way to cook low and slow in a Weber kettle is to use two firebricks (a heat sink that also blocks radiant heat) and use only 10-12 natural briquettes (lit with a electric starter), replenishing with freshly lit briquettes every 75 minutes. This will hold the temp at 265-295 more reliably than the Minion or Mini-Minion method.

An upside down roast rack turned sideways allows you to cook 5 vertical racks in a 22 inch kettle.

Tim


Edited by tim (log)

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AB in Right on Q uses the fan/controller assembly very effectively on a charcoal kettle grill, using the same principles as a ceramic cooker.

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AB in Right on Q uses the fan/controller assembly very effectively on a charcoal kettle grill, using the same principles as a ceramic cooker.

I use a fan controller with my primo and it works great. I have no problem beleiving that they would work great on almost any kind of charcoal grill with a lid. The one I have "learns" how the grill behaves and adapts accordingly. I am sure the others brands works the same.

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