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Thanksgiving Dinner, for the not so fortunate


woodburner
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Around this time of year some people spend some time helping or contributing in some way for individuals in some type of need, at the end of the day, no matter how small or large of the contribution they have made, it seems to enlarge the spirit.

Food related, I'll be cooking a Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner for a special friend, and deliver it to him around mid-day.

I would certainly would much rather have him enjoying it in a larger social setting, but he declined to be around other's whom he did not know.

Anyone else doing something?

woodburner

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We're deliverng meals to shut ins again. We have done this 3 of the last 4 years and even my kids want to go. Had to drag them the first time.

I usually make a sweet or two (pralines, pecan pie, etc) to go along with it as the dessert on those things is usually some kind of dry yellow cake with white icing.

Not that there is anything wrong with dry yellow cake and white icing......I'm just saying....

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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My family and I have gone to downtown Atlanta and have helped serve at this incredibly moving event ...

The late Dr. Hosea L. Williams, as a way to confront hunger in Atlanta, conceived "Feed the Hungry and Homeless". As the late Dillard Munford, one of America's wealthiest entrepreneurs, once said: "Hosea's Feed the Hungry and Homeless " program proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that, as fast as Metro Atlanta is growing, it is still 'not too busy to love' ". By providing food for the hungry on Thanksgiving and Christmas, Rev. Williams, his family and a few friends filled their bellies and renewed their souls...
Hosea Williams "Feed the Hungry" Thanksgiving website

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I will be at the foodbank helping make up the boxes (from Monday thru Wednesday), and, health willing, serve food at the Montana Rescue Mission while we take a break from our home cookin. I may also take a ride with my preacher girlfriend out to three elders in the Pryor Area to deliver goodie baskets along with the feast- type we are going to be delivering. If I make it through all this I will consider myself blessed, because it was really up in the air just a month ago. Someone lend me a little of their strength!!

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My family and I have gone to downtown Atlanta and have helped serve at this incredibly moving event ...
The late Dr. Hosea L. Williams, as a way to confront hunger in Atlanta, conceived "Feed the Hungry and Homeless". As the late Dillard Munford, one of America's wealthiest entrepreneurs, once said: "Hosea's Feed the Hungry and Homeless " program proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that, as fast as Metro Atlanta is growing, it is still 'not too busy to love' ". By providing food for the hungry on Thanksgiving and Christmas, Rev. Williams, his family and a few friends filled their bellies and renewed their souls...
Hosea Williams "Feed the Hungry" Thanksgiving website

A giving experience for sure.

I did a few of the large homeless feedings in Albany NY.

The last time I offered my efforts, was at one of these huge undertakings. To my dismay, I spotted in the taking line, was a certain individual and his family well into the middle class income bracket.

I'll reserve my comments, on the thoughts I had for a few years for people that take advantage of certain situations in life.

Now, in todays George Jetson age, I offer services and contributions in with which I am in complete control on how things are dispersed.

woodburner

Edited by woodburner (log)
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My workplace is having a Holiday Food Drive for the local Food Bank all day tomorrow. As successful as they have been in the past it always seems as if it's not enough.

But we do what we can.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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At holiday times in past jobs, we participated with coworkers in delivering dinners to some of those less fortunate, people who were financially needy. Russ and I now both work for a Hospice organization, and employees and volunteers prepare dinners and deliver them to those who could probably afford going out to dinner or cooking, but have a member of their family on Hospice care and nearing death. They usually don't have the desire or energy to cook a big dinner and don't want to leave their loved one to go out. They really appreciate and enjoy a dinner made for them and delivered. It's a different sort of giving, and it is quite rewarding.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Sometimes helping the less fortunate has a taint that really disillusions a person, from those like you mention, woodburner. I agree, it's a pitiful SOB that would make use of things given for the folks who could really use and appreciate this once or twice a year thing; I get through by thinking that what goes around, does indeed come back around. And they better duck when it does, or that appearance may end up being a rehearsal for future meals.

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Bless those of you who are helping. My approach, though, is different. When homeless people beg for money for food and I have time, I offer to buy them a sandwich of their choice and a drink (non-alcoholic, like coffee or tea). I also have sort of adopted one street person who hangs out at the corner of my block and give him a buck or so when I have the time and money. It's great that many people remember the homeless and indigent on Thanksgiving and Christmas, but it's not nearly so good that so many people forget them during the rest of the year. Let's not forget that people have to eat every day of the year, not only on holidays.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Like Pan says, people have to eat every day. Mom and I have been getting involved in spreading the word for monthly food bank donations, for one of the area banks. We're also trying to get some banks to work with restaurants and groceries in doing a thing called "food rescue" meaning that instead of throwing away something nearing the expiration date, or left over from that evening's service, the grocery or restaurant brings it to the food bank. This concept worked well in Virginia for the CVFB.

The academic society at school also rounds up tons of food quarterly to go directly to a shelter for abused women and children. It's little enough to donate directly, and the shelter saves what $ would normally go for the nominal fee the food banks charge.

Keep on, because what goes around really does come around.

"My tongue is smiling." - Abigail Trillin

Ruth Shulman

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Let's not forget that people have to eat every day of the year, not only on holidays.

How kind of you to point that out. That is not something we easily forget, but perhaps some do. StudentChefEclipse and others doing such year-round good deeds, that is wonderful, and heart warming reading about it.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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We here in MT seem to have the hardest time with noncommercial donations in the summer. Please don't let anyone think I was lightweighting the yearround plight of foodbanks, it's just that this is our easiest time of year. This morning on our am news, the 'official' fooddrive started, and in one hours' time at one of the Albertson's, they garnered 28 turkeys.

One of our local dentists is offering a teeth whitening for 50 bucks if you bring a turkey to the foodbank truck.

At least we here have gotten over our near disaster from last year when some scum broke into the office at the foodbank, and when they only found 12 bucks in petty cash, set fire to the office. This a month before TDay.

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The last time I offered my efforts, was at one of these huge undertakings. To my dismay, I spotted in the taking line, was a certain individual and his family well into the middle class income bracket. I'll reserve my comments, on the thoughts I had for a few years for people that take advantage of certain situations in life. 

Sorry if I misunderstood the comment, but please be careful about judging people's appearances. Unless you actually know this person and his family, you don't really know why they are eating their Thanksgiving dinner at such a place. In this age of downsizing, rightsizing, outsourcing, whatever euphemism you want to use, plenty of middle-class people are struggling to make ends meet. And many homeless and other poor folks do make an effort to keep themselves neat as they go to their day jobs that don't pay them enough to keep a roof over their heads or their families fed.

Edited by chile_peppa (log)
"It is a fact that he once made a tray of spanakopita using Pam rather than melted butter. Still, though, at least he tries." -- David Sedaris
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I probably misread it also. In a town our size, one gets to know those who are making use of the system, such as it is.

Last year, we had an extra 600 family units in need because of a monthlong teachers' strike, so there's always circumstances to take into consideration.

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I've always wanted to put together this huge spread, sit everyone down at the table, say grace, then (without warning) pack the whole thing up and take it to a shelter. And drag the entire clan along just to see the look on my families faces.

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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When you do it, let me know...I will keep my eyes peeled for CourtTV updates about the riot in steeltown!

My PC SIL is always onto me about aren't I afraid I'll catch something down at the Rescue Mission? Once I finally said, "Whatcha think I'll catch? Bigger blood clots?" If she and the clan from Hell ever did something for other people, I fear she would have an attack of do-gooderism so bad I'd have to take her to the rez for a real reality check. Otherwise, I'd have to hear about it forever.

She has this one little habit that pisses me so bad sometimes that I really have to clamp my yap---in the course of bad-mouthing the "drunken Indians" in the downtown, she will pause to say, "Oh, I didn't mean like you," as if I'm supposed to be grateful for her kind consideration. I am always so astounded from it that I cannot think of a comeback that would actually shut her up. Maybe one of our wittists would help me out.

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I will be making up extra food that I will be delivering to homeless nearby the day after Thanksgiving, along with other non-food items that might be helpful. I donate all year round, but haven't been able to deliver anything up until now. I'll be bringing both fresh and canned/packaged food, blankets, warm clothing, soap, and anything else that might be appreciated.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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There are always "middle class" people in the line at our local Thanksgiving meal for the homeless (indeed some are now in need). But most are the volunteers who cook and serve. Some are always eating throughout the meal with the other people in line.

If you want to volunteer for TGiving, do so - but remember there are 364 other days when the same services are needed.

Special mention should be made of the Jewish (and increasingly other faiths) people who man the lines on the other big day - Christmas. In our community they make up a very large percent of the volunteers in many areas of service, allowing Christians to be with their families that day while needed services are still being provided.

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I've just taken "Mike's" locally farm raised turkey from my brine.

gallery_11593_339_1101355084.jpg

Mike is pretty excited about me cooking him Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday. I'll be smoke roasting this bird, early tomorrow in my outdoor custom cooker.

Weather forecast is shit, but who cares, it's for him and I'm committed.

woodburner

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I've always wanted to put together this huge spread, sit everyone down at the table, say grace, then (without warning) pack the whole thing up and take it to a shelter. And drag the entire clan along just to see the look on my families faces.

I am reminded of Marmee in Little Women asking her girls to take their Christmas meal to the ailing Hummel (? I am doubting my memory on that name) family. The girls were so grumpy, but the joy was so abundant once they surrendered to it. It's nice to be called "angels" in the old-fashioned sense, without being afraid of being compared to Lucy Liu or Drew Barrymore.

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