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Oysters - The Topic


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I was going to suggest raw. Don't bother with any preperation except for the shallot sauce if you must. But a squirt of fresh lemon and you will be in heaven. I'm very jealous :smile:

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All right! This will be way more than you need, obviously you will half or third...

1/2 cup white wine

1/2 cup white wine vinegar

3 tablespoons finely chopped shallots

About a teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Enjoy :wub:

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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OK... this is something that should work, making 6 each, for you and your fiance. I like to open them (well actually I like my husband to open them) and set the oysters aside, reserving the juice. Blanch some chopped savoy cabbage and set aside. Boil the oyster liquor with a little white wine added until reduced to almost a glaze. Whisk in some cream, and reduce until you have the thickness you want for a cream sauce. Put a little "nest" of the savoy cabbage in each half shell, and then put an oyster on each nest. Put under the broiler only until the edges of the oysters curl. Remove from the oven and top each with a little cream sauce and then a little dollop of cheap caviar, or whatever you can afford. We use the salmon or whitefish easily found in the supermarket. Then serve... it helps if you have some rock salt to put on the plates and set the oysters on that to hold them steady, and it makes for a nice presentation.

yum, this sounds great Susan!! I just might have to try this...

Recently I was at a friend's house for dinner and they made a sorrel pesto for the oysters, lightly broiled them, then put the pesto on, then served. They were incredibly delicious. hmmm I should get that recipe too :raz:

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Hi, M.! That oyster preparation with the savoy cabbage has been one of our favorite oyster dishes for a long time... Besides the raw, of course.

I would love to see that sorrel pesto/ oyster recipe if you get it, or do an improv. I don't often find sorrel in our markets, so I grab it up when I do. Next time I have some, I'll try this.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I served a mignonette at my oysterbar that went like this:

1 cup Champagne Vinegar

5 minced Shallots

2 heaped spoonful of William/Sonoma 5peppercorn blend (leave whole)

best to leave a couple days before serving. This out -served the trad cocktail sauce by end of season. :smile:

Edited by johnnyd (log)

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  • 3 years later...

Forgive me if there is already a thread on this, but reading about oysters on the "Foods You're Supposed to Find Delicious" thread (ironically) gave me a hankering..... :raz:

So, besides raw on the half shell, what are your favorite recipes featuring oysters?

(In particular, I'm intrigued by the concept of oyster dressing- I grew up in the southern US, yet I've never tasted it. All other ideas are welcome, though!)

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Forgive me if there is already a thread on this, but reading about oysters on the "Foods You're Supposed to Find Delicious" thread (ironically) gave me a hankering..... :raz:

So, besides raw on the half shell, what are your favorite recipes featuring oysters?

(In particular, I'm intrigued by the concept of oyster dressing- I grew up in the southern US, yet I've never tasted it. All other ideas are welcome, though!)

Why can't I eat them raw? :)

This probably isn't what you had in mind, but I love to make Oyster Soon Du Boo. We can get freshly flown in, shucked Korean baby oysters on weekends at the local Korean monster-mart. I usually add a lot more oysters to the stew than any self-respecting Korean restaurant would though, it's like an oyster orgy. :wub:

A local Chinese restaurant called China Inn makes a nice dish using oversized sea oysters (wish I knew more about the type, they are enormous). They are served steamed on the half shell with a heavy-ish black bean/scallion sauce. These oysters are strong flavored and I don't think they would be good for eating raw.

It's something you have to order off the "secret" Chinese menu: if you don't specify otherwise they hand you the Westerner Chicken Chow Mein menu. If anyone knows more about this type of oyster, please drop me a PM.

Edited by Batard (log)

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Batard, you are welcome to eat them raw! :wink: I'm just looking for different ways than I already know to make 'em.

I've loved Korean food the few times I've been able to eat it out, but would be incredibly happy to make it at home. Recipe, PLEASE?! :biggrin:

Edited by Sony (log)
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Sony:

I think my family's oyster dressing is the best.... used mostly for holiday turkeys... is that what you're interested in?

(I just didn't want to mis-interpret if you meant some kind of stuffing to put in a half-shell..)

Jamie Lee

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One great way to eat them is in a pan roast: cream, butter, chili sauce and Worcestershire, all gently warmed together. Worth picking up the cookbook from the Grand Central Oyster Bar just for that one recipe. Any variation on Oysters Rockefeller generally rocks, too: spinach, pork (bacon or ham) a little cream, amybe some shallots, some Pernod if you're feeling sassy.

Here are a few more suggestions.

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Oysters Pablo from Cindy's Backstreet Kitchen in St. Helena, California. The combination of mayo, spinach, and chili oil is simply divine. It's like Oysters Rockefeller (another favorite of mine) but even more fabulous. Whenever we visit the restaurant, we usually order two rounds of these suckers - and wish we had more.

I will also confirm you MUST try oyster dressing.

I also love a really, really good fried oyster - big, juicy, not too much breading - eaten plain. It's hard to improve on that.

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Oysters! I know a place up from Egmont on the Sunshine coast where a saddle appears at low tide and it's nothing but oysters. Tie off the boat, get out the knife, and settle in for some eating by the foot (or third of a metre....that would be Canada).

Oysters (little ones) fried in an omelet Thai style are always a treat.

And you could also do a Thai salad with them, loaded with lime,garlic and chilis (but then they'd still be raw, technically) if they're small enough.

And at The WGF in Bangkok Paul Wilson from The Botanical did a Carpaccio of Hiramasa Kingfish

with Rock and Pacific Oyster, where the oysters are gently warmed through with scallops.

Oh, and don't forget to keep and use the juice. Keller's FLC has a great cauliflower pannacotta with oyster glaze and sevruga caviar recipe that I love (and it works well with broccoli, too).

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Oysters (little ones) fried in an omelet Thai style are always a treat. 

Ooh, how is this done?

I linked to a video of hoy tod in this topic. I tried making it at home. It was good, but not as good as Thai street food.

I like oysters cooked teppanyaki-style. High heat, butter, and wee bit of soy and lemon juice. Oh so good... :wub:

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Oysters (little ones) fried in an omelet Thai style are always a treat. 

Ooh, how is this done?

I linked to a video of hoy tod in this topic. I tried making it at home. It was good, but not as good as Thai street food.

I like oysters cooked teppanyaki-style. High heat, butter, and wee bit of soy and lemon juice. Oh so good... :wub:

Thanks! I got interested in this whole oysters'n'eggs thing recently when Jaymes (I think) suggested scrambled eggs with smoked oysters. I wasn't too crazy about that because of the strong smoke flavor and the mealy texture of canned oysters, but I did like the oysteriness with eggs. I missed the Fried Oyster Cakes thread, but that's just what I'm after.

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One great way to eat them is in a pan roast: cream, butter, chili sauce and Worcestershire, all gently warmed together.  Worth picking up the cookbook from the Grand Central Oyster Bar just for that one recipe. 

This one?

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Either lightly grilled (summer) or broiled (winter) with a little garlic butter, then maybe a dash of hot sauce or oyster bbq sauce*, if I have it, when they're done. You can put them on a hot grill or in the oven whole for a few minutes, until they start popping open, to help with the shucking, if you like. We've been doing this almost every sunday since we get the oysters at the sunday farmer's market here.

*I pick up a jar of oyster bbq sauce-kind of like cocktail sauce, but not exactly-when I'm at the Marshall Store on Tomales Bay, in Marin County, Ca (the epicenter of oyster growing in CA) and it might sound like heresy to some but damn that oyster bbq sauce is good.

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Thanks! I got interested in this whole oysters'n'eggs thing recently when Jaymes (I think) suggested scrambled eggs with smoked oysters. I wasn't too crazy about that because of the strong smoke flavor and the mealy texture of canned oysters, but I did like the oysteriness with eggs. I missed the Fried Oyster Cakes thread, but that's just what I'm after.

I've found that all cans of smoked oysters are not created equally. I've eaten quite a few smoked oysters in my time (my mom would buy them when we were little as one of those little side-type things to eat with rice and add a little flavor/salt) and some are mealier than others. I also like them despite the smoke flavor - I usually don't like that stuff.

That being said, I need to find a brand that's decent so I can make some of those tasty-sounding scrambled eggs!

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Childhood memories always works for me. My grandfather used to get buckets of oysters, before all this red tide and pollution, and he would just pour boiling water over the oysters until they openned up. Served with a vinegar sauce, much like a typical mignonette sauce.

BBQ oysters or baked with provencal type breadcrumbs. Or with spinach and bacon, topped with hollandaise or mornay sauce. :wacko:

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Fugu - that's how my family would do it too. My mom would have the maids scrub the oysters clean then heat up a huge pot of water to boil and quickly blanch the oysters in it. It does open up the oysters a little and then the shucked oysters would be dipped in a vinegar with chopped onions dip.

My favorite oyster recipe is the Oyster Po Boy Sandwich. I've tried the oyster omelet and the oyster pajeon (korean scallion pancake with oysters). I still love my Po Boy. :wub:

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One great way to eat them is in a pan roast: cream, butter, chili sauce and Worcestershire, all gently warmed together.  Worth picking up the cookbook from the Grand Central Oyster Bar just for that one recipe. 

This one?

Funny -- that's pretty different than the recipe in the cookbook - much less oyster-centric. In the book they call for eight oysters instead of six, a quarter cup of oyster liqueur rather than two cups of clam juice, and 1/2 cup of cream rather than 2 cups of half-and-half.

We have a supplier of excellent shucked oysters (also unshucked) so we usually make it with whatever ratio of oysters/liqueur comes in the jar -- on average slightly less than the recipe calls for.

I expect it will work either way, but the preponderance of clam juice and half-and-half in the linked recipe reminds me of a cafeteria stretching it's supply (or of a TV show trying to adapt a recipe for the masses).

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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