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How To Keep Small Items from Going Down The Drain?


gulfporter
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I bought new standard tweezers to pluck errant bones out of raw salmon before cooking.  Worked like a charm!  

 

I normally throw my prep utensils, pots, pans, etc. into the sink as I go along; my DH is the dishwasher if I cook.  I threw the tweezers into the sink out of habit but quickly realized they were destined to fall into drain and cause some sort of plumbing issue.  

 

Before I decided to use standard "eyebrow" tweezers, I looked at longer kitchen tweezers on-line and decided they might not have the torque (is that the right term??) to pull out salmon bones (these bones need more than a standard "pull").  It seemed the grip area was too far removed from the end of the tweezers.

 

Am trying to think of what I might attach to the small tweezers so they won't get lost in the sink with a boatload of other items.  

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 I use mini (jewellers‘)  needle-nose pliers for that job. They work way better than tweezers and are less likely to become lost. At the same time I find it easier to just clean them and put them away rather than toss them in the sink because they are likely to rust.  Just another option you might consider.

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My kitchen sink has this. I think it may have come with the sink - I've never seen one exactly like that in the kitchen supply shops. It is good for catching all but the smallest food fragments and small utensils.

 

726533041_sinktrap.thumb.jpg.5c78e4f04b2bddb4adab62075b35c89f.jpg

 

As for fish bone removal, I have been using these fish boning tweezers for about fifteen years. They were sold specifically for the purpose, work very well and cost less than peanuts.

 

849090431_fishtweezers.thumb.jpg.effa4c1b0dac6aa360968387da5169b7.jpg

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23 hours ago, heidih said:

Surgical instruments are also a cheap effective option. We use forceps at the Garden to deal with prickly cacti and small seeds and seedlings.  Same concept.

 

I like these in particular.   Smooth jaws and a short handle like this one.

https://www.amazon.com/Webster-Surgical-Needle-Holder-Stainless/dp/B01JKTPOX4/ref=sr_1_10?crid=O4H2B1LBNPH1&keywords=needle+holder+surgical&qid=1551466096&s=gateway&sprefix=needle+holder%2Caps%2C125&sr=8-10

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